The Red Chamber and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$38.69
Qty:1
  • List Price: $55.00
  • Save: $16.31 (30%)
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Red Chamber, the (Lib)(CD) Audio CD – July 10, 2012


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audio CD
"Please retry"
$38.69
$38.69 $79.50
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "Landline" by Rainbow Rowell.

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Books on Tape (July 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449008835
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449008836
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 6.4 x 1.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,036,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Rarely does a cast of beloved literary figures from another culture and time come alive on the pages of a modern writer's work. Pauline Chen has reimagined the characters from my very favorite novel to make a compelling new version of China's great literary masterpiece. I highly recommend The Red Chamber. It will transport you into an altogether new world -- Arthur Golden, Author Of Memoirs Of A Geisha --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Pauline Chen earned her B.A. in Classics from Harvard, her J.D. from Yale Law School, and her Ph.D. in East Asian Studies from Princeton. She has taught Chinese language, literature, and film at the University of Minnesota and Oberlin College. She is also the author of a novel for young readers, Peiling and the Chicken-Fried Christmas, and lives in Ohio with her two children. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Pauline Chen was born in California, and grew up in Stony Brook, New York. After studying classics at Harvard and law at Yale, she completed a doctorate in Chinese literature at Princeton University. Her dissertation focused on the late Tang poets Du Fu, Li He, and Li Shangyin. She has taught Chinese language, literature, and film at the University of Minnesota and Oberlin College. She is the author of Peiling and the Chicken-Fried Christmas, a novel for young readers. Her essays on Chinese film have appeared in Cineaste and Film Comment. The Red Chamber is her first book for adults, and has been translated into French, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, and Polish. Pauline lives in Oberlin, Ohio, with her two children. To learn more about Pauline Chen and THE RED CHAMBER, please visit paulineachen.com.

Customer Reviews

Characters are real and easy to identify with, lovely story.
Robert Nixon
It was one of those books that when you start reading you do not want to put it down.
Lovestoread
The many characters and their odd names at first had me very confused.
Terri J. Rice

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Stegall on June 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Much is made of the fact that Pauline Chen has "reimagined" one of the great novels of Chinese literature, "Dream of the Red Chamber", in this debut novel. I am inclined to skepticism, however, as I would be if someone decided to "reimagine" Chaucer or Shakespeare. For example, none of the original magical, supernatural trappings of "Dream of the Red Chamber" make it into Chen's novel, thereby removing an entire layer of meaning, depth and beauty from her re-imagining of it; this is rather like rewriting "A Midsummer Night's Dream" but leaving out all the fairies. Also missing are the philosophical discussions, the poetry, the intricately braided plots that lend such fascinating complexity to this classic.

I'll grant that Chen had hard choices to make, since the original ending to "Dream of the Red Chamber" is lost, and a tacked-on ending by another author more or less reverses the tale of feudal dissolution that dominates the first half of the novel. Just as "Gone With the Wind" is not just about the romance between Scarlett and Rhett, "Dream of the Red Chamber" is more than a romantic tragedy; it's a sometimes devastating critique of feudal society. But Pauline Chen has dropped almost all of the political and philosophical commentary that makes this 18th century novel so refreshingly contemporary. What remains is a serviceable soap opera, overlaid with the glaze of exotic locale and custom. Move any modern soap opera far enough into the past, and it gains an air of faux respectability or importance that might not accrue to it in a modern setting.

Chen straddles both these approaches by keeping her tale set in 18th century China, but narrating it in the present tense. This bizarre juxtaposition of ancient setting and ultramodern narrative style threw me off very frequently.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Nitty's Mom TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If not for Amazon Vine program, I might have put this book down after the second chapter, which would have been a huge mistake. The story builds slowly and can initially be confusing due to difficulty remembering the Chinese names, yet this book turned out to be unforgettable.

As the authors note depicts, The Red Chamber is inspired by Cao Xuequin's "Dream of the Red Chamber" a beloved 18th century Chinese novel. The author, Pauline A. Chen, writes "What follows is my attempt to finish the story for myself, while paying homage to this beloved masterpiece and sharing it with a wider audience." What a fascinating story this turns out to be.

When Daiyu's mother, Jia Min dies, her last request is that her daughter return to Beijing, and her family who has disowned her. In Beijing, Daiyu meets the Jia Family and is amazed by the lavish lifestyle they lead. The Jia's are a very influential family due to their connection with the Imperial family of China. At the palace of Rongguo, Daiyu meets her uncle Jia Zheng the Under-Secretary of the Ministry of Works, her calculating and cold grandmother Lady Jia, and her cousins Jia Lian and his wife Wang Xifeng. Most important is the relationship she develops with her charismatic cousin Jia Baoyu. The grieving Daiyu feels an immediate attraction to her cousin which he quickly reciprocates. As was the social custom in 18th century China, the Jias are also living with another influential family the Xues, the widowed sister-in law of Jia Zheng's and her daughter Xue Baochai and son Xue Pan. Baochai has also been enamored with Baoyu, but never confident enough to think she can win his love.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Grammy123 on June 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
In the 1980s my husband and I visited China a number of times with Chinese friends. On the last trip, I was given the 3-volume set of "A Dream of Red Mansions." For years I struggled through the first volume with the cast of characters at my side. I felt I knew enough about China to tackle the story, but I was sadly mistaken. I made it half-way through the second volume before I gave up. I kept the books on my shelf intending to get back to them someday. In the meantime I devoured every other Chinese novel. I finally came across "The Red Chamber," and would like to thank Pauline Chen for her wonderful adaption of this old story. Now that I've finished her book, it may be just the encouragement I needed to pick up where I left off with the original.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By susan boyke on December 30, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have not been a fan of Asian movies so I did not expect to enjoy this one but I loved every page. It took a while to remember all the names and where they fitted but that was a minor issue. I was so taken with the reality of this complex family and how they interacted. All successfully due to the wonderful writing style.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Addison Dewitt VINE VOICE on June 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Pauline Chen's debut novel, "The Red Chamber" is a brilliant premiere entry into the world of literature. The story is gleaned from the classic "Dream of the Red Chamber" by Cao Xuequin but is reinvented with a modern touch, most notably in dialogue. Yet Chen keeps the poetry and imagery of 18th Century China completely in the mix and the result is a masterwork that compares easily with "Raise the Red Lantern" (and surpasses it) and other stories that center around the woman's plight in Chinese culture of that era.

While there are many characters to keep track of and the book starts off a bit unclear, by the 3rd chapter I was hooked and soon deeply invested in the story. At over 350 pages with fairly small type, this is not lightweight fiction and Chen fills the pages wonderfully, using prose in a way that deftly moves the story forward. There are many twists and turns which are unexpected; heroes and heroines both meet sad fates and underdogs rise to the top. Maneuvering this host of personalities through their culture and the ups and downs of 1700s royal life is not an easy task, but Chen handles it with aplomb. The result is a novel which I will gladly return to again.

I highly recommend this book for those who are fans of Asian culture and literature. The book is easily worth the price and merits 5 stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?