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Red Delta: Fighting for Life at the End of the Colorado River Paperback – October 7, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing (October 7, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555914608
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555914608
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 6.9 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,803,316 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Water rights are fiercely protected in the desert American Southwest. In cases such as the Colorado River, which drains into Mexico's Gulf of California, these battles can sometimes trigger international arguments. Since the Water Treaty of 1944, the United States has claimed rights to 90 percent of the Colorado's water, reducing the river to a comparative trickle by the time it reaches Mexican soil and as a result adversely affecting the lush delta region. Academic Bergman (Wild Echoes: Encounters with North America's Most Endangered Species) spent three years studying and photographing the endangered delta. His book, developed with the assistance of the activist group Defenders of Wildlife, creates vivid impressions of the species and habitats of the delta's past and its possibly hopeful future. In the second part, Bergman outlines the legal and political strategies for overturning the Treaty of 1944 and encouraging, instead, laws recognizing that nature is not contained within the artificial boundaries of nations. As he notes, there is scientific evidence that, if water rations were more equitably distributed, the delta would flourish once again. Although his prose is occasionally weighed down by dry facts and figures, the author's passion for the environment and his empathy for the people of the delta shine through the text. This issue is more than just a local squabble, and Bergman's book belongs in all strong in-depth and comprehensive environmental collections
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

…the author’s passion for the environment and his empathy for the people of the delta shine through the text. -- Library Journal, Nov 2002

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Hank B. Still on October 4, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Deeply felt, and vividly descriptive, this book examines and explains in a clear yet poetic and personal manner the very complex and desparately contested issues concerning the Colorado River and its end at its Delta in Mexico at the Gulf of California.
This is an important story that no one else has told! This is the story of one of the largest and least known man-made environmental catastrophes in history. It is also a story of hope - there are signs of life in the Delta. Parts of it have come back to life with no help from humans. Bergman also lays out the solution to the Delta's woes: "the 1% of the Colorado's water for the Delta" idea. This will rejuvenate the greater Delta with very little effort and at virtually no cost. Bergman tells the poignant stories of the endangered people and cultures of the Delta, and skillfully weaves them in with stories of the endangered and threatened flora and fauna of the Delta and the Gulf of California. A book illustrated with beautiful photographs, thoroughly researched, and passionately executed in every detail. Inspiring! An important book! An instant Colorado River classic! A book no truly committed environmentalist should be without, and an easy way into the issues of Southwest water for the casual reader.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By I. Bergman on October 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
Red Delta explores an amazing, almost forgotten section of the world. Through gorgeous photography and evocative writing, Bergman brings the Delta to life -- the land, the animals and the people. It's clear why the book has won three awards - and counting, i'm sure - and I highly recommend it for anyone interested in US water policy, the Delta, or both.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
Red Delta is the ecological story of fighting for life at the end of the Colorado River discusses keys to understanding environmental collapse and recovery in the Southwest. The Colorado River Delta was an 'accidental delta' created by developers who never fully realized their goals. Red Delta explores the environmental consequences of that Delta, which may now be realized as an important key to the Colorado natural area surrounding it.
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6 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you like your environmentalism in breathless hyperbole; if you like to have an author's central thesis beaten over your head in nearly every paragraph; if you subscribe to the Chicken Little version of the current state of the environment; or if you just want to read a truly bad book, try Charles Bergman's Red Delta. This book tells us in its various sections that (1) the delta is teeming with life, (2) the delta is dead, (3) the delta needs preservation and restoration, and (4) the delta is threatened. So, since these are not all compatible thoughts, which ones are true? And if the Cienega de Santa Clara really once was a mudflat devoid of vegetation, why would anyone seriously consider "restoration"? This book fits perfectly into W's America, where the creedo seems to be: "It is not supposed to make sense!" This book is less about the current state of the Colorado River delta and more about Bergman's adventures there, conversations with people who have more than a vested economic interest in the delta, and opinions on life in general. He's clearly in love with his impressions; every other word seems to be from the following list: "amazing, astounding, magnificent, remarkable, legendary." He's obviously a neophyte concerning natural history, since among other things he seems to find it noteworthy to tell us repeatedly that riparian and aquatic ecosystems depend on water (Duh!). I find it ironic that Bergman, a professor of English, didn't use a copy editor, because this book suffers from excessive repetition, bad sentence structure, and occasional typos ("Glenn Canyon Dam"). The following statement actually appears in the book (p.Read more ›
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