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Red Dog Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Bolinda Audio; Unabridged edition (December 10, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781742679501
  • ISBN-13: 978-1742679501
  • ASIN: 1742679501
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.6 x 5.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,331,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Red Dog is a book by a writer in love. While passing through a town in the Australian outback, novelist Louis de Bernières discovered a statue of a dog. Intrigued, he made inquiries, and was swamped by locals with tales of a wildly charismatic creature named Tally Ho. De Bernières, author of Corelli's Mandolin, has fashioned a charming picaresque of Tally's misdeeds and misadventures, not least of which involve the animal's enormous appetite (complemented by an equally enormous flatulence). "Tally," he writes, "was the most notorious canine dustbin in the whole neighbourhood. With apparent relish he ate paper bags, sticks, dead rats, butterflies, apple peel, eggshells, used tissues and socks." De Bernières' enchantment with this "dustbin" is a reflection of a larger rapture: here is a writer who has fallen for Australia itself. He wittily captures the country's cadences, its landscape, its weakness for the (literal) underdog. --Claire Dederer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The best stories about animals are really stories about the people who form bonds with them, and therein lies the central fault of this extremely slender effort from the celebrated author of Corelli's Mandolin. Apparently, de BerniŠres was so taken with a statue of a sheepdog he found in an unnamed town in Australia that he had to uncover the sources that fed the local legend. He transformed them into this picaresque narrative, a series of tall tales, written in a self-consciously folksy style about the animal known variously as Red Dog, Tally Ho and Bluey. Because de BerniŠres anthropomorphizes him, Red Dog comes across as all too human, while the people who know and love him are mere stick figures; the author acknowledges he "invented" them and it shows. While the dog does possess an uncanny ability to make his wants and needs known (more probably, it's the uncanny predilection for humans to interpret the dog's various "communications"), these tall tales simply aren't tall enough. To be effective, the anecdotes that make up the book should be surprising, amazing or at the very least delightful, but Red Dog's adventures are mundane. The dog is clearly meant to evoke the pioneering Australian's conception of himself: independent, resourceful, footloose and stubborn. Red Dog is also prone to aggressive flatulence, presumably not an element of the Australian character. No doubt there was an Australian sheepdog that was well-loved by a circle that transcended a single family or even a town, but it's a stretch to turn that idea into a book, even one as slight as this one. Dog lovers might bite, but other readers should beware. The book is charmingly illustrated by Alan Baker, and includes a useful glossary of "Australianisms."

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Louis de Bernieres was awarded the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book Eurasia Region in 1991 and 1992, and for Best Book in 1995. He was selected by Granta as one of the twenty Best of Young British Novelists in 1993, and lives in Norfolk, East Anglia.

Customer Reviews

His range is incredible, his prose superb!
Coffee Lover
I found the book to be very good and hard to put down.
Amazon Customer
I thoroughly enjoyed this easy to read book.
Marian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By John Mackay on September 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is bound to become a classic, like "The Snow Goose". De Berniere has captured a disappearing Australia - frontier Western Australia in the not-too distant past.

Like many good novels in the last decade ("Dirt Music","Cloud Street" "The Shark Net"), it is set in Western Australia. It is a story for all ages, told in simple, unfussy narrative. It does not idealise the dog, its friends or enemies. I am suprised that it has been dismissed by some as a "children's book". I cannot imagine why.

Any dog lover would be delighted by this novella.

I just hope it's not made into a film. It's a narrative that can only live on the page.

It can be read in a few hours, but its effect will last for years.

John MacKay, Sydney Australia
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By taking a rest HALL OF FAME on February 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Louis De Bernieres has written some marvelous literature. "Red Dog", is a wonderful true story about a dog that befriended a good portion of Australia, and has been memorialized with a bronze statue as well as other books. Faithful readers of this author will likely be disappointed if they expect another sweeping novel. This short story does not appear to have been planned, as it unfolds with crisp episodes in the remarkable life of this canine. It is extremely unusual in that the book has been illustrated with what appear to be etchings. Illustration has sadly become the domain of primarily very expensive, limited edition, small press books.
This is not a child's book, perhaps for young readers in Junior High, but not for young children. This is a book about adults and how a remarkably charismatic canine changed their lives. This is not a fairly tale, it includes the realities of very trying circumstances and the people who pioneer the way in this extremely difficult environment. When it gets hot in the USA warnings suggest certain groups stay indoors. When it gets hot down under, warnings are issued for gas tanks that are prone to explode when exposed to the sun!
I think it is great that an author who has established himself as an accomplished literary writer would have the courage to step well away from what has worked for him repeatedly. I was reminded of some of John Steinbeck's work that centered around animals, both his own and fictional. If John Steinbeck can make the change I believe it is safe for other accomplished authors to explore unfamiliar genres, and they do not deserve to be punished for doing so. This is especially the case when the results are so worthwhile. I was going to give this 4 stars but I stepped it up to 5. The book was punished and I wanted to even out what is a brief but entering read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brizdaz on August 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I can't sum it up any better than John MacKay has in his review of it here.
But worth repeating is the last line of his review;

"It can be read in a few hours, but its effect will last for years."

If you can,buy the illustrated version.The wonderful drawings by Alan Baker added so much to the reading experience for me,making it more of a work of art than just a book.
I will treasure my copy in the years ahead.

Just one correction to the "Glossary of Australian-isms" in the book.
It says a "Stubbie" is a can of beer.But a "Stubbie" is a small bottle of beer.
A can of beer is called a "Tinnie",even though now-days they are made out of aluminum.
My preference as a beer drinker is the "Stubbie",as I think the beer tastes better and is less of a fuss to drink out of.

Here's to Louis De Bernieres.I raise my "Stubbie" to you for a tale well read.
(tail well red...get it?...never mind)
Cheers!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gerald E. Murphy on February 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
G'day mates! The book was delivered in the morning one day, and I read it straight through in one sitting before bedtime. It made me appreciate my own dog a great deal more than my previous great love for her. There are a few words in the text that are unique to Australia, but the glossary at the end of the book makes these clear. Be prepared to pause once in a while as you read so you might laugh out loud, or clear the tears from your eyes. It's a terrific read!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on December 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
We consider Canis familiaris a "domestic breed", but there are some dogs who cannot abide constant human contact. A brief contact, particularly for meals or temporary shelter is enough. Then, it's off again on a fresh exploration or hunt. Such a dog was the rust-coloured kelpie living in Western Australia's Pilbara mining territory. Known as "Red Dog" for obvious reasons, this animal moved through the human community entirely on his own terms. De Bernieres traces much of Red Dog's life, or at least what could be determined from interviews and newspaper accounts, presenting it as a continuous story. It's a captivating read from the opening page.

Although this book might be considered in the "young folks" genre of the "Lassie" or "Shep" variety, Red Dog was real. Giving him a name would have been out of place. De Bernieres introduces him as "Tally Ho", but that was in his early years when Red Dog's centre of operations was a caravan inhabited by an older couple. Moving into a mining community, Red Dog discovered how to manipulate the miners, all men without companions, and the surrounding communities. They petted, fed and sheltered him in turns. He cadged rides in buses, cars, even on the train running south to Perth, nearly 1500 kilometres distant. As the town grew, Red Dog improved his tastes, hitting hotels and restaurants for culinary leftovers. He took up with one of the workers, but John's death in the bush led Red Dog to further his explorations. He was seeking his lost "master".

The stories of Red Dog's wanderings give de Bernieres an opportunity to apply his descriptive skills to the people and the countryside. He fully captures the Australian inflections, and notes how a mining town was a magnet for itinerants.
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