Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.95
  • Save: $7.15 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: clean copy. No marking .
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact Paperback – August 19, 1997


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.80
$11.75 $3.03


Frequently Bought Together

Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact + God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, 30th Anniversary Edition + The World We Used to Live In: Remembering the Powers of the Medicine Men
Price for all three: $44.95

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing (August 19, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555913881
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555913885
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #155,865 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Though Deloria (Custer Died for Your Sins) has a broad academic brief?he teaches history, law, religious studies and political science at the University of Colorado?here he ventures into a new area, attacking the way scientists have created "a largely fictional scenario describing prehistoric North America" and suggesting that Indian lore may offer better explanations. Given Deloria's not-so-temperate tone?"Christianity has been the curse of all cultures into which it has intruded"?it is hard to judge all his arguments. He finds flaws in scientific accounts of how Indians once traversed the Bering Strait land bridge; he also reports that geological evidence suggests an earlier Indian presence and notes that no tribal creation stories reflect such a migration. Similarly, he criticizes scientists who argue that Indians killed off North American megafauna of the Pleistocene era. Deloria's fiercely argued study sometimes overwhelms as a narrative, but his charges should provoke more evaluation, as well as examination of the consonance of science and Indian tradition.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Deloria, one of the most outspoken Native American voices of the century, is back?this time to take on the scientists. Demonstrating that a theory is just that until it has been solidly proved, the author of Custer Died for Your Sins (Univ. of Oklahoma, 1988) takes the scientific community to task for insisting on uniformity of opinion within academia while neglecting Native oral traditions about such events as the peopling of the Western Hemisphere and the disappearance of the giant animals of the Pleistocene era. While many will challenge Deloria's arguments, the author's insistence that scientists investigate non-Western knowledge in their search for the truth echoes a cry heard through Native American communities. An important addition to all collections.?Mary B. Davis, Huntington Free Lib., N.Y.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
8
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
9
See all 34 customer reviews
I found the book to be very enlightening.
M. Hendricks
Deloria seems to think that glacial geologists, paleontologists, archaeologists, and paleo climatologists are all in league to make American Indians look bad.
Lewis Richards
Highly recommended...absolutely fascinating.
laura bartlett-fischer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 61 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
If "science" is defined as a technique for gaining an understanding of the world around us, many "scientific" disciplines are in fact profoundly unscientific. In "Red Earth, White Lies," Vine Deloria, Jr. clearly demonstrates how conjecture can attain the status of fact, even in the face of overwhelming contradictory evidence. Perhaps even more condemning is Deloria's depiction of how alternative ideas, most notably indigenous traditions, are frequently (typically) cast aside without any investigation whatsoever, simply because they conflict with currently accepted norms.
"Red Earth, White Lies" is a wonderfully provocative indictment of how historical sciences, such as anthropology, geology, and ecology (my own field) frequently fail in practice. Nevertheless, perhaps without realizing it, Deloria relies on the very hallmarks of modern science; alternative hypotheses, critical analysis, and crucial evidence, to make his case.
Here, unfortunately, is where "Red Earth, White Lies" loses much of its power. While Deloria succeeds in casting doubt on many beliefs cherished by entrenched academics, he typically does not subject his own hypotheses to the same treatment. Even more unfortunate, Deloria himself employs some of the techniques he most violently condemns in academics, including the selective use of information (the most obvious example is on page 58) and summary dismissal of entire world-views on the basis of a superficial understanding (his entire discussion of evolutionary biology, for example).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
Vine Deloria Jr.'s book is a very useful and merited challenge to a whole host of theories, especially the Bering Strait land bridge, magafauna extinction ("Overkill") and some other things in which U.S. racism, capitalist waste and ruthlessness towards the environment, and scientistic narrowness are shown to be the underlying roots of these theories. However, I can't help but feel that Deloria both throws the baby out with the bathwater based on a kind of "multicultural creationism". For example, his attacks on Stephen J. Gould are almost ridiculous at times (given his prominence, not as a mainstream Darwinian, but as a 'catastrophist' and anti-sociobiologist) and represent the fact that he never got past Gould's first collection of essays. Also, Gould and others have for years defended allopatric speciation, which would allow a species' 'gestation' in 5-10,000 years. This type of narrow, shotgun scholarship makes Deloria subject to exactly the type of criticism he so correctly levels at academia. Also, his knowledge of genetics and evolution seem to leave a lot to be desired, and he clearly does not expect the reader to be scientifically literate (otherwise, he would not be able to make some of the peculiar remarks he makes about speciation). Anyone familiar with modern biology cannot but be amazed at how his work is little more than a reworking of Christian Fundamentalist creationism (or vice versa). Having said that, Deloria's value as an anti-racist, as a defender of the worth and validity and richness of non-white, non-European sources of knowledge is more than worth the occaissional bad science and anti-intellectualism. All I can say is that this is essential reading for anyone learning about the material he covers, and for thinking about how racism and power can determine whose knowledge is 'myth and fantasy' as much as it determines who is the 'terrorist' and who is the 'freedom fighter'. A must read book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. E. Wilkes on April 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
A few others here have commented on the author's outdated understanding of evolutionary theory. I'd like to add that Deloria's view of contemporary (sociocultural) anthropology follows suit. Just as with physical anthropologists and evolutionary biologists, social anthropologists are accused of clinging to 19th century theories of social evolution-- ideas one of my anthropology professors described as "Old, crappy anthropology."

If anything, social anthropologists are allies when it comes to defending Native American beliefs and traditions-- I know of no one in the field today who has less than total respect for the people they study and learn from, no scholar who feels themselves superior or better understanding of his or her informants' world. More than any other field of study, sociocultural anthropology seeks to understand and validate the wide variety of human culture, without creating hierarchies or privileging one society over another. Words like "advanced" "civilized" and "primitive" make us green about the gills.

The condescension and controlling nature the author accuses anthropologists of having are precisely the attitudes that I was trained to avoid; further, I was trained not to believe in my own objectivity, but to be reflexive and aware of my own subjectivity.

Reading this book is like reading someone slamming doctors for using leeches. Deloria seems shocked and frustrated that scientists are human, even expressing disappointment and disillusionment when colleagues in a political science department discussed office politics rather than theory during their lunch break. (Who talks shop on a break? Does it really discredit their work that it's not something they think about 100% of the time?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?