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Red Land, Black Land: Daily Life in Ancient Egypt Audio CD – Bargain Price, March 15, 2008


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Tantor Media; Unabridged,Unabridged CD edition (March 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400105757
  • ASIN: B007MXV6O2
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.1 x 5.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,864,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"One can only highly recommend the book." ---Natural History --This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

About the Author

Barbara Mertz studied at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, receiving an M.A. in 1950 and a Ph.D. in Egyptology in 1952. A former president of the American Crime Writers League, she presently serves on the editorial advisory board of KMT, A Modern Journal of Ancient Egypt and the board of governors of the American Research Center in Egypt, as well as the editorial board of The Writer. She is also a member of the Egypt Exploration Society, the James Henry Breasted Circle of the Oriental Institute, and the National Organization for Women. Under her own name she is the author of Red Land, Black Land, Daily Life in Ancient Egypt. Under her pseudonym Barbara Michaels, she has written twenty-nine novels of suspense. As Elizabeth Peters, she has produced twenty-nine mystery-suspense novels, many of them set in Egypt and the Middle East. The Mystery Writers of America awarded Dr. Mertz the MWA Grandmaster in 1998. Lorna Raver has been named a Best Voice of the Year by AudioFile magazine and has been nominated for Audie Awards for her readings of Washington Square by Henry James, Nothing with Strings by Bailey White, and Marion Zimmer Bradley's Ravens of Avalon by Diana L. Paxson. She has also received numerous AudioFile Earphones Awards for her narrations. An accomplished stage actress, Lorna has also guest-starred in many top television series, and she stars in director Sam Raimi's film Drag Me to Hell.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
68%
4 star
24%
3 star
7%
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See all 41 customer reviews
Overall, this is a worthwhile book for anyone interested in ancient Egypt.
Pierre Gauthier
Of course, Ms. Mertz could probably make the Boston Phonebook palatable; I would certainly read anything she chose to write.
Sarah Asher
One of my favorite mystery series of all time is Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Mertz/Barbara Michael's Amelia Peabody Mysteries.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Asher on January 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover
A wonderful sequel to 'Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs', this book sets aside the well-scrutinized lives of famous pharoahs, and turns instead to the day-to-day life of the rest of Ancient Egypt. Much of the material is new to me, and I found it fascinating reading. Of course, Ms. Mertz could probably make the Boston Phonebook palatable; I would certainly read anything she chose to write. (I firmly believe she hangs out with Elizabeth Peters; Joan Hess occasionally dropping in to make a threesome..)
Enough fawning! Read this book! It's interesting! You can tell them I said so...
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By villa@excite.com on February 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this a while back and I must say, "jolly good writing," which of course is now my only expectation from Ms. Mertz/Peters/Michaels & any other pseudonyms she has chosen to go by.
As an aside, I was watching tv the other day and saw Ms. Mertz on an A&E Ancient Mysteries Special on Queen Maatkare Hatshepsut. That was Jolly Good too!
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Loved it. This book is actually a textbook, but it's the most interesting textbook I've ever read. It really gives you a "feel" for daily life in ancient Egypt.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Armchair Interviews on October 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
Barbara Mertz is also the real name of writers Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels. She has written 37 books in the popular Amelia Peabody series (Amelia is a Victorian Egyptologist and archaeologist) and 29 suspense books as Michaels. Mertz received her doctorate in Egyptology in 1952, and her first book published was Temples, Tombs, and Hieroglyphs: a Popular History of Egyptology. Her first novel was published in 1966. This is the second edition of Black Land, Red Land, originally published in 1978.

This well-written and readable book is an excellent source of information on life in ancient Egypt. Mertz covers everything, including childhood, pets, women and queens, clothing, jewelry and cosmetics, towns and houses, education, magic, religion, science, medicine, mathematics, pyramid building, boats, mummification and tombs. All are fascinating, though my personal favorite is the chapter on painting and sculpture, and the Amarna period. The XVIII Dynasty has always fascinated me: the time of Queen Hatshepsut, Akhenaton, and Tutankhamon. It is difficult to imagine a kingdom and society that lasted for nearly 4,000 years; the U.S. is an infant in comparison. There is a chronology, map, notes, and a list of books for further reading. The line drawings and photographs enhance the text perfectly.

Readers of the Amelia Peabody and Vicky Bliss mysteries, anyone longing to travel to see the ancient wonders of Egypt, or anyone with an interest in archaeology, will love this book.

Armchair Interviews agrees.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of my favorite mystery series of all time is Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Mertz/Barbara Michael's Amelia Peabody Mysteries. When I first discovered it, I thought it was a lost treasure and I have savored every book since that first one. I also enjoy her romance/mystery books as Barbara Michaels.

I will be honest and say that when I first began reading the Amelia Peabody Mysteries some of the Egyptian discussions went a bit over my head. I found my Egyptian History to be sorely lacking, so when I discovered that Barbara Mertz/Elizabeth Peters wrote some non-fiction books about Egyptian History I was thrilled and I new it would be a good way to start learning a bit of information about one of my new favorite topics, Egypt.

Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphics is the first book she wrote and deals more with the Egyptian rulers and dynasties. Red Land, Black Land is the second one and deals more with the Egyptian people. It covers a wide variety of topics including rising children, pets, women's lives, clothing, jewelry, towns, houses, magic and religion, science and medicine, and painting and sculpture. It is extremely interesting and I found all of the topics engaging and concise. I believe that Barbara Mertz/Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Michaels has such a rare gift she could make the history of sandpaper interesting. I have read some reviews where people felt that she expressed some of her own opinions and views too freely, but I thought that she did a good job about making known what other popular opinions are in the field even if she doesn't necessarily agree with them. As I have begun purchasing more books about Egyptian History, I am very glad that I started with these books that have provided me with excellent background essential information that makes reading more detailed involved books much easier.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Length: 432 pages.

Bearing in mind that I lived and worked in Egypt for nearly 25 percent of my 62 years on this planet. Well, 25 percent unless someone can somehow prove that I am a reincarnated pharaoh or visiting spaceman.

Readers of this book will appreciate my humor, as I also am confident the author would, were she to read this review.

One of the many bits of her wry humor was when she warns the squeamish to skip her description of a particularly gruesome bit. The then jabs the reader halphway through, stating, I told you...

Barbara Mertz is my type of writer. If I ever get off my duff to write of modern Egypt, i will want to appeal to the same mindset Mertz so gracefully educates regarding a topic that usually is rather dry. Well, it is dry if the writer is trying to stay close to the serious observations and discoveries.

Perhaps that dryness is why so many less serious and less informed writers author the, uh, aw, the heck with it, let's call it what it is, the kooky fantasy tales of the occult and visitors from some far flung Galaxy.

I have a somewhat vast library regarding ancient Egypt. I've taken two magnificent cruises to visit the tombs and temples between Luxor and Aswan, plus once visited Abu Simbel. Yet, I gained unspeakably more understanding from this one book, including the audible.com version narrated by Lorna Raver. Indeed, Raver did a terrific job of narration.

As a former expat having resided 15 years in Egypt, I found this to be a remarkable, fresh approach to teach us about ancient Egypt.

Therefore, I not only enthusiastically rate this at five stars. I recommend getting the Kindle book plus Whispersync so you can listen when you don't have time to read the book. I'd give Red Land, Black Land 10 stars if I could. Belongs in every historian's library.

What's more, I intend also to buy a printed copy next payday. It IS that good, for me anyway.
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