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Red Legs and Black Sox: Edd Roush and the Untold Story of the 1919 World Series Paperback – January 24, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Clerisy Press (January 24, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578602297
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578602292
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,651,298 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

A book on Edd Roush is entirely appropriate, and this one is written by his granddaughter.
Bill Emblom
While this book tells much the same story as other books about the scandal, it does have a unique selling point.
JMack
The forgotten story of the 1919 World Series is the the White Sox stole the series from the Reds twice.
Justin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Fletcher on March 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
Red Legs and Black Sox:

Edd Roush and the Untold Story of the 1919 World Series

Susan Dellinger, PhD

Emmis Books 2006

Reviewed by David J. Fletcher, MD

Fresh in the wake of the White Sox winning the 2005 World Series and overcoming the curse of the 1919 Black Sox comes a new book that looks at that fateful 1919 World Series from the perspective of a star player from the team that won the tainted crown.

Red Legs and Black Sox Edd Roush and the Untold Story of the 1919 World Series (Emmis Books 2006) is authored by Susan Dellinger, PhD. This book is about the life and times of Edd Roush, the ambidextrous Hall of Fame center-fielder from the Cincinnati Redlegs.

Roush, who inducted into the Hall of Fame, in 1962 along side Jackie Robinson and Bob Feller, was the last living player from the 1919 World Series until his death in 1988. In fact, in 1987 six months before his death, Roush visited the set in Covington, Kentucky of the movie version Eliot Asinof's Eight Men Out (8M0) and met with 8MO director John Sayles. Edd (with his colorful two Ds in his first name) Roush was also a principle reference source for Asinof in the early `60s when he wrote 8MO

Dr. Dellinger, who happens to be the granddaughter of Roush, adds tremendous details to the story previously told in pieces before by Lawrence S. Ritter in his The Glory of His Times (McMillan 1966) and in Eugene Murdoch's oral baseball history.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Reds Fan on May 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
I had high hopes for the book. I'm an avid reader of anything related to Reds history, and the early-1900 era has always fascinated me.

Let me start by saying that the book seems well researched. The author (the granddaughter of Edd Roush, perhaps the greatest player of Cincinnati's 1919 squad) clearly spent a great deal of time tracking down information, never before seen photos, and she did a fairly decent job of examining a topic that's been exmained in baseball literature over and over and over again. From a strictly fact-finding standpoint, the book is a success.

However, I found that the overall story just didn't live up to my own expectations. Maybe that's my own fault, and not the book's, but I think a lot of baseball fans will come to the same realization I did. At times, the book felt too "cutesy." I doubt the recreations of some of the conversations and events. And I got the impression that the author didn't enter the project with a great deal of baseball knowledge.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Best Of All on July 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
Susan Dellinger, the granddaughter of Edd Roush, pens a biography on the legendary outfielder for the Cincinnati Reds, with the focus at about the halfway portion of the book on the 1919 World Series.

There has been so much written concerning the infamous "Black Sox Scandel," but Dellinger adds a piece to the puzzle through the perspective of Roush. Roush had heard about the fix from a Cincinnati businessman and had the opinion that several players on his club were attempting to dump games late in the series.

The book demonstrates how gambling was part of baseball; from those who made of living of playing/manipulating the odds, to the fans in the "cheap seats," and - importantly - the players and team management.

There will never be a definitive account of the fix. But Dellinger delivers a few more facts that will allow the reader to make a determination on "what really happened" that fall in Cincinnati, Chicago and cities large and small throughout the country.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Roger Hamburg on February 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
A great book about the life and times of Ed Roush,the Hall of Famer from the Cincinnati Redlegs(Reds)who played against the Chicago "Black Sox (the color of their stockings,)in the infamous 1919 World Series.Susan is Roush's grandaughter.She has details that only she would know revealing details and information that are unavailable elsewhere.(Her grandfather would not reveal the name of the gambler who he spoke to in the hospital in 1928 who "blew the entire affair up" but it is hard to check his story.She begins where "Eight Men Out" ends.MUST READ.!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By JMack VINE VOICE on March 4, 2008
Format: Paperback
While numerous books exist regarding the Black Sox Scandal of 1919, this book takes a unique perspective. Written by the granddaughter of Reds star Edd Roush, the book explores the scandal from the Reds point of view. A quick paced read, fans of the topic are likely to enjoy the book regardless of which side of the divisive arguments they fall.

While this book tells much the same story as other books about the scandal, it does have a unique selling point. The book gives a new angle to the story; the White Sox were not the only crooked players. Through his granddaughter, Roush suggests not only that other players of the era were crooked, but members of the 1919 World Champion Reds may have been under the influence of gamblers. Dutch Ruether and Slim Sallee, according to Roush's observations and his speaking to others, seem to have been influenced.

I enjoyed the story and the fresh angle it was given. The research seems solid though it is inexcusible to make careless mistakes such as alternating between the incorrect "Comiskey Field" and "Comiskey Park". The newspaper cartons from newspapers of the era are further demonstration of solid research efforts.

One of the center arguments seems to be that the Reds would have won the series regardless of the gamblers. Dr. Dellinger makes the argument that the Reds have been relegated the title "synthetic champions" far too long. While I respect her biased opinion, I will politely disagree that the better team did not win the 1919 World Series.
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