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on July 5, 2009
Short version:

Among all fuel system cleaners I'm aware of, Redline SI-1 contains the highest quantity per dollar (based on manufacturer MSDS) of the critical fuel-system-cleaning compounds known as polyether amines (PEA). Primarily for this reason I believe SI-1 to be the best available and most cost-effective fuel system cleaner product at retail pricing. [...].

In my case it has not been necessary to use Redline's recommended quantity of approximately 3 oz per fill-up. The effects of 1 oz per fill-up are indistinguishable in terms of tested results (see my basis for this statement below). This results in an approximate cost of $0.35/tank or less than a tenth of a penny per mile. A full case at this usage rate is enough to treat 180 full tanks of fuel or to last approximately 80,000 miles. (Figures based 15gal/tank, 25-35mpg).

Long version:

As far as I know, every effective fuel system cleaner on the market uses a class of compounds known as polyether amines (PEA), in varying proportions, to effectively clean deposits from fuel system components, and particularly from fuel injectors, which can quickly impact engine efficiency and performance when not operating correctly. My understanding is that these compounds were first developed by Chevron and sold under the Techron name, and have since been made available to other blenders of fuel treatment products. Until recently BG 44K, Chevron Techron Concentrate, Gumout Regane Fuel System Cleaner, Amsoil P.I. Performance Improver Concentrate, and Redline SI-1 (among others) listed polyether amines on their Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) in proportions varying from approximately 25% to 50%. Most of these products no longer list PEA on their MSDS, having changed their terminology to disguise the precise nature of their products' constituent components. Whether PEA is still contained in those products is a matter of uncertainty. As of this writing Redline's SI-1 MSDS still specifies that the product contains 30-50% PEA. Consequently it is one of the few remaining fuel system cleaner products that undoubtedly does contain PEA in significant quantity.

I have been able to test the efficacy of fuel system cleaners in one of my own vehicles using a method I stumbled on after having its injectors professionally cleaned while out of the vehicle. The car in question uses a Bosch engine management system that reports fuel injector data to an on-board computer, which then uses that data to calculate and report instantaneous and average mpg to the driver. I noted after the professional cleaning that the accuracy of the reported mpg, when used to measure average mpg over each full tank of fuel, improved suddenly from a prior error of around -3% - -5% (that is, the reported mpg was ~3-5% below the actual mpg, or typically just over 1mpg low) to an error as close to zero as I could measure (that is, usually between -1% and 1%, fluctuating above and below a perfect "match"). This can be explained on the basis that the engine management system will compensate for a dirty injector by holding the injectors open slightly longer during each combustion cycle, in order to admit the proper amount of fuel. The on-board computer interprets that as a slightly higher rate of fuel consumption, reporting a lower-than-actual mpg figure.

After several thousand miles - not long - the perfect mpg accuracy I'd noticed began to deteriorate, likely indicating that the cleaned injectors were beginning to suffer from some sort of renewed impedance to fuel flow. Out of a desire to retain near-perfect injector performance, and also out of curiosity, I started experimenting with various commercially-available fuel system cleaners and keeping records of the results at each fill-up.

Leaving out the long details, I'll simply say here that the results were surprisingly clear and unambiguous. Each time I went several tanks without using a fuel system cleaner (usually as a result of simply forgetting to use it or not taking the trouble), the on-board computer (OBC) accuracy would deteriorate. This would fluctuate from tank to tank, of course, as a result of inevitable measurement errors, but the trend was very clear even over a small number of fill-ups. Returning to the use of a fuel system cleaner (Chevron Techron Concentrate, Gumout Regane or SI-1, all of which at the time did contain PEA), the accuracy would improve again very quickly - within 2-3 fill-ups. I began using the SI-1 exclusively seven months ago based on its apparent cost-effectiveness and since then I have reduced the quantity I use in each tank to the current 1oz per ~15gal fill-up. The results remain unambiguous. If I use this small amount of SI-1 consistently, the accuracy of the on-board computer is excellent, with an average error of below 1%, or a fraction the error rate seen when not using such a product.

Based on the above I feel I can confidently conclude that SI-1 works very well, even at reduced treatment rates, at keeping fuel injectors clean. Fuel system types and injectors will vary, and other parts of the fuel system - for example intake valves and combustion chambers - might benefit from higher treatment rates (or, conceivably, might not benefit at all). Actual engine efficiency will not vary nearly as much as injector cleanliness, since the engine feedback system normally corrects for imperfect injector flow rates. However, as the flow is more greatly impeded, or impeded differentially among the individual injectors, mpg will be affected to some degree. I feel it is well worth the tiny cost to consistently use a small quantity of SI-1. Other benefits, such as to combustion efficiency as a result of combustion chamber cleanliness, to volumetric efficiency as a result of intake valve cleanliness, and to fuel system lubrication, probably exist as well although I can not evaluate them and have not attempted to do so. Other fuel system cleaners may work as effectively, or nearly as effectively, but I do not believe them to be as good in terms of value per dollar spent.

In my experimentation I did try some less expensive fuel system cleaners, those not containing PEA. They appeared to have no effect. I can not categorically state that only PEA-containing fuel system cleaners work, of course, but my observations did match the conventional wisdom on this point. I also experimented with using top-tier fuels only, without any additional fuel system cleaners. The results were the same as when using non-detergent (Costco and others) fuels. I don't doubt that top tier fuels contain small amounts of cleaners and will keep a fuel system functionally and acceptably clean, but the quantities involved are reputed to be tiny and my observations seem to indicate that even a small amount of additional additive is far more effective.
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on July 14, 2015
Redline SI-1 is currently the best fuel system cleaner that is readily available. One of the best examples supporting this statement is represented by the condition of my 2003 S2000's engine. I bought the car new and I'm responsible for essentially every one of the 99,700 miles on the clock. The earlier S2000s (1999-2003 model years - called the AP1) are notorious for oil consumption through the PCV valve (for a number of reasons), and as a consequence the intake manifold and throttle body will typically develop a nasty coat of carbon saturated goop. In contrast - the intake and throttle body of my S2000 could only be cleaner if I steam cleaned them (or ran a water/methanol injection system). I credit this product's use, in conjunction with using a top-shelf synthetic oil (Amsoil) with keeping my engine not only clean, but essentially free of wear. The last leak-down test performed on my engine (at 90,000 miles) showed less the 2% leak-down in all cylinders, and no more than 0.5% difference between all cylinders (1.25, 1.5, 1.5, 1.75 - cylinders 1-4). I do not drive my S2000 conservatively either, as it gets revved to 9000 RPM 2-3 times every time I drive the car - and my car is geared with a 4.44 final drive. Those are essentially 1/8th mile gears, and contribute to higher than normal RPMs in all gears, when compared to a stock S2000 - and significantly more RPMs on average than any conventional street car.

To give the proper perspective, the age of an engine is not simply a function of the number of miles driven, but as a function of how many average RPMs the engine turns per unit distance (measured in the engines average RPMs turned per mile driven). This is why (generally) a car with mostly 'highway' miles typically has significantly less engine/drivetrain wear than a car with mostly 'city' miles (and why city driving is considered "severe" driving conditions by most auto manufactures). With this in mind, your average Honda S2000's engine turns 1.5 - 2 times as many RPMs per mile as the average passenger car under 'normal' driving conditions. If an S2000 is driven in a 'spirited' manner - that number can be over 2.5 times the average car. So (for example) imagine a Toyota Camry with less than 2% leak down per cylinder with over 200,000 miles on the clock (essentially an engine that is barely broken in) - that would be amazing, and would give a more effective measure of part of the benefit of this product has provided my S2000. So imagine how much your 3 Series, Camry, Accord, Fusion… ANY gas fueled car would benefit from using SI-1 and a quality synthetic oil? It truly does make a difference.

You might ask - "how does a fuel system cleaner reduce wear in an engine?". The full answer is complicated, but the simplified explanation is that the the fuel - more importantly the additives in the fuel - provide upper cylinder lubrication (direct lubrication), and the detergent action in the fuel additives is designed to help prevent and remove carbon deposits in the engine. Deposits due to fuel quality and combustion byproducts are a major source of wear in all engines.

Most top-tier fuels (Chevron/Texaco, BP, Shell, Exxon to name a few) collectively established a self-imposed convention to supply higher levels of detergents than required by the government (a form of self-regulation). However, these fuels supplied with almost twice the level of detergents required by the government still do not provide enough detergent and lubrication to keep your engine clean - especially with the levels of ethanol pushed by the corn lobbies. As a result, deposit build-up is still a reality facing car owners. While deposit formation is not immediate in top-tier fuels - and most certainly not nearly as fast as with bottom-of-the-barrel fuels (Citgo, Raceway, Sams Club… etc), it will happen over time. This is where SI-1 shines: it provides outstanding upper-cylinder lubrication and cleaning action - keeping your engine almost analytically clean, and it does this without chemically breaking down your motor oil (in blow-by products).

One of the reasons this product works better than products from other quality fuel system cleaner manufactures (such as BG and Chevron), is the fact the SI-1's detergent process is more 'gradual', because it's specifically catalyzed by the heat of combustion - and the cleaning process is not solely reliant on strong chemical solvent action. The main components of SI-1 responsible for it's highly effective cleaning process (as mentioned by several other reviewers) are polyether amines (PEA). BG (44K), Chevron (Techron), and essentially most other fuel system cleaners rely heavily on strong solvents (non-polar solvents, of varying concentration and quality) instead of PEAs to remove carbon and other deposits (even though some of these products use low levels of PEAs in their formulation). While the use of quality solvents can be highly effective (again, dependent on the concentration and quality of the solvents used), the unfortunate side effect can be the premature chemical breakdown of motor oil - which is why most fuel system cleaner manufacturers recommend you use their products the tankful prior to a scheduled oil change. How many people are able or willing to schedule/time the last tank of fuel before a scheduled oil change in their busy lives? Not many.

You might have noticed I only mentioned two other capable fuel system cleaners by name (products which I believe are very effective "cleaners"). Their specific mention was deliberate. Other than Redline, BG, and Chevron the only other effective fuel system cleaner that I would recommend to anyone would be the one made by Amsoil (Performance Improver - PI). PI works in a similar manner to Redline's SI-1 and contains PEAs, but I have found Redline's SI-1 to be more effective and economical when compared to Amsoil's PI. The vast majority of other branded fuel system cleaners are essentially "snake oil", using ineffective concentrations or mixtures of solvents and carrier solvents (heavy aromatic naphtha, xylene), heavy petroleum products - and in the worst products, they use heavier alcohols (polar protic solvents) in place of more effective cleaning agents. The use of alcohols and some heavy petroleum products actually does more harm than good and actually creates more deposits. Your car may seemingly run a little better when operating with fuel treated with those products - but the car will rapidly run worse once the product is diluted in the follow-on tanks of gas. What does your average person do then? Buy more and add it to the fuel again (thinking it needs a little more cleaning). The car then runs a little better, but then doesn't (again) when the product is diluted… and I think you get the idea. This vicious cycle doesn't happen with a quality cleaner.

SI-1 Usage: The best way to use SI-1 is the way it was originally designed to be used - by titrating (mixing) a specified amount per tank (depending on how much fuel you fill up with). I personally use approximately 1/10-1/4 bottle per 10 gallons - using a higher concentration if my car's engine needs more cleaning (subjective decision), or if I am forced to use a lower-tier gas due to low fuel and few to no other options.
The instructions on the bottle recommend using a full bottle every 3,000-5,000 miles or so (like most of the fuel system cleaners available) - but not because of a formulation change. The change from Redline's previous recommended per-tank addition of SI-1 to a 3-5k mile interval was pure marketing - because most people are notoriously lazy and unwilling to add something every fill-up, and Red Line's marketing decided to accommodate those too lazy to titrate. While a bottle every 3-5k miles is not at all a bad choice (I occasionally do this to supplement the per-tank titration method), I don't substitute a 3,000-5,000 mile interval for the much more effective addition of SI-1 in every tank.

The main problem with cleaning your fuel system only once per 3,000-5,000 miles is the fact carbon and other deposits build up over the interval between clean-ups - and that build-up increases wear over that time. If you're running a conventional or cheap synthetic oil - that increased wear is happening just as your oil is breaking down, compounding the wear problems. Furthermore, treating one tank-full of fuel with your chosen fuel system cleaner once every 3,000-5,000 miles will not get rid of all the cumulative build-up, and the following interval between clean-ups will accumulate more deposits than the interval before the last (and so on).

SI-1 keeps my S2000's engine constantly clean as it is driven, and build-up (and wear) has never been a problem. Using SI-1 in conjunction with using a quality synthetic oil (such as Amsoil) is the best way to ensure long life and flawless operation of your (gas powered) vehicle's engine.
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on January 6, 2009
Short version:

Among all fuel system cleaners I'm aware of, Redline SI-1 contains the highest quantity per dollar (based on manufacturer MSDS) of the critical fuel-system-cleaning compounds known as polyether amines (PEA). Primarily for this reason I believe SI-1 to be the best available and most cost-effective fuel system cleaner product at retail pricing. At the current price per bottle when bought by the case right here on Amazon ($5.30) it is a bargain (12/15/09 edit: the price here has almost doubled since I wrote this and it is now, unfortunately, far from a bargain).

In my case it has not been necessary to use Redline's recommended quantity of approximately 3 oz per fill-up. The effects of 1 oz per fill-up are indistinguishable in terms of tested results (see my basis for this statement below). This results in an approximate cost of $0.35/tank or less than a tenth of a penny per mile. A full case at this usage rate is enough to treat 180 full tanks of fuel or to last approximately 80,000 miles. (Figures based 15gal/tank, 25-35mpg).

Long version:

As far as I know, every effective fuel system cleaner on the market uses a class of compounds known as polyether amines (PEA), in varying proportions, to effectively clean deposits from fuel system components, and particularly from fuel injectors, which can quickly impact engine efficiency and performance when not operating correctly. My understanding is that these compounds were first developed by Chevron and sold under the Techron name, and have since been made available to other blenders of fuel treatment products. Until recently BG 44K, Chevron Techron Concentrate, Gumout Regane Fuel System Cleaner, Amsoil P.I. Performance Improver Concentrate, and Redline SI-1 (among others) listed polyether amines on their Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) in proportions varying from approximately 25% to 50%. Most of these products no longer list PEA on their MSDS, having changed their terminology to disguise the precise nature of their products' constituent components. Whether PEA is still contained in those products is a matter of uncertainty. As of this writing Redline's SI-1 MSDS still specifies that the product contains 30-50% PEA. Consequently it is one of the few remaining fuel system cleaner products that undoubtedly does contain PEA in significant quantity.

I have been able to test the efficacy of fuel system cleaners in one of my own vehicles using a method I stumbled on after having its injectors professionally cleaned while out of the vehicle. The car in question uses a Bosch engine management system that reports fuel injector data to an on-board computer, which then uses that data to calculate and report instantaneous and average mpg to the driver. I noted after the professional cleaning that the accuracy of the reported mpg, when used to measure average mpg over each full tank of fuel, improved suddenly from a prior error of around -3% - -5% (that is, the reported mpg was ~3-5% below the actual mpg, or typically just over 1mpg low) to an error as close to zero as I could measure (that is, usually between -1% and 1%, fluctuating above and below a perfect "match"). This can be explained on the basis that the engine management system will compensate for a dirty injector by holding the injectors open slightly longer during each combustion cycle, in order to admit the proper amount of fuel. The on-board computer interprets that as a slightly higher rate of fuel consumption, reporting a lower-than-actual mpg figure.

After several thousand miles - not long - the perfect mpg accuracy I'd noticed began to deteriorate, likely indicating that the cleaned injectors were beginning to suffer from some sort of renewed impedance to fuel flow. Out of a desire to retain near-perfect injector performance, and also out of curiosity, I started experimenting with various commercially-available fuel system cleaners and keeping records of the results at each fill-up.

Leaving out the long details, I'll simply say here that the results were surprisingly clear and unambiguous. Each time I went several tanks without using a fuel system cleaner (usually as a result of simply forgetting to use it or not taking the trouble), the on-board computer (OBC) accuracy would deteriorate. This would fluctuate from tank to tank, of course, as a result of inevitable measurement errors, but the trend was very clear even over a small number of fill-ups. Returning to the use of a fuel system cleaner (Chevron Techron Concentrate, Gumout Regane or SI-1, all of which at the time did contain PEA), the accuracy would improve again very quickly - within 2-3 fill-ups. I began using the SI-1 exclusively seven months ago based on its apparent cost-effectiveness and since then I have reduced the quantity I use in each tank to the current 1oz per ~15gal fill-up. The results remain unambiguous. If I use this small amount of SI-1 consistently, the accuracy of the on-board computer is excellent, with an average error of below 1%, or a fraction the error rate seen when not using such a product.

Based on the above I feel I can confidently conclude that SI-1 works very well, even at reduced treatment rates, at keeping fuel injectors clean. Fuel system types and injectors will vary, and other parts of the fuel system - for example intake valves and combustion chambers - might benefit from higher treatment rates (or, conceivably, might not benefit at all). Actual engine efficiency will not vary nearly as much as injector cleanliness, since the engine feedback system normally corrects for imperfect injector flow rates. However, as the flow is more greatly impeded, or impeded differentially among the individual injectors, mpg will be affected to some degree. I feel it is well worth the tiny cost to consistently use a small quantity of SI-1. Other benefits, such as to combustion efficiency as a result of combustion chamber cleanliness, to volumetric efficiency as a result of intake valve cleanliness, and to fuel system lubrication, probably exist as well although I can not evaluate them and have not attempted to do so. Other fuel system cleaners may work as effectively, or nearly as effectively, but I do not believe them to be as good in terms of value per dollar spent.

In my experimentation I did try some less expensive fuel system cleaners, those not containing PEA. They appeared to have no effect. I can not categorically state that only PEA-containing fuel system cleaners work, of course, but my observations did match the conventional wisdom on this point. I also experimented with using top-tier fuels only, without any additional fuel system cleaners. The results were the same as when using non-detergent (Costco and others) fuels. I don't doubt that top tier fuels contain small amounts of cleaners and will keep a fuel system functionally and acceptably clean, but the quantities involved are reputed to be tiny and my observations seem to indicate that even a small amount of additional additive is far more effective.
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on August 18, 2013
I have had several cars and I have come upon Redline's reputation as perhaps THE premier maker of synthetic lubes; (*cue: AMSOIL trolls, chime in now.) After doing a lot of extensive reading about motor oil on Bob Is The Oil Guy (Google it,) I became convinced that Redline was perhaps THE best oil; and while there is no "best oil," If I was going to spend big money on oil or simply wanted the best, I would choose Redline for its proven reputation with its oils, AND HAVE REMAINED SO EVEN WITH SLIGHT FORMULATION CHANGES (Read up on API SN and how it differs from API SM and API SL, etc, there is less of what was known to be the good stuff and it has been replaced with new good stuff, /endrant) - Or, perhaps, Royal Purple for a high performance, specialty oil. Honorable mentions to Mobil 1 and Pennzoil for ultra good oils as well (do you see what I did there?) On the fence about many others; nothing "wrong" with them, but why buy Castrol...

That said, this review is not about motor oil. It is about fuel system treatment. And Redline SI-1 specifically, at that!

Now let me tell you why I like this Redline product...

Firstly: PEA. I forget what PEA stands for, but, as far as I know, it is about the ONLY chemical or ingredient in a fuel system cleaner or injector cleaner - four categories? Well, if it goes in the fuel, then it goes where the fuel goes... So get the strongest one....... - that ACTUALLY CLEANS. Let us make a list of those that are a SHAM, and really DONT have ANYTHING of VALUE in them:

- STP
- Slick 50, OLD AND NEW formula..
- Lucas (there, I said it. I have some experiences as well as research with products from this company, not relevant to this review.)
- Prestone
- Pro-Long
- SEAFOAM (!!!)
- "Most of the shelf".. money-wasters.. makes Walmart happy..
-- WHY? BECAUSE THYEY DO NOT HAVE PEA, or VERY LOW AMOUNTS but more like NOT, if you look at Product Data Sheets. Labels lie. Product Material Data Sheets? They don't lie.

Now, back to WHAT WORKS: I have found that there are only three, criterion: HIGH IN PEA, therefore WORKS...

- Gumout with REGANE (Regane is the PEA, three GUMOUT products have it: The All-In-One, the High Mileage, and another yellow liquid version, High Mileage is Orange and All In One is amber)
- Royal Purple MaxClean (** HAS PEA; just different chemicals to MAKE it PEA;)
- Redline SI-1.

^^ Now.. Out of these three, Redline has the HIGHEST amount of PEA in it. Gumout has a lot, too... And I put one Royal Purple MaxClean in my car recently. I then ran out of gas. >.< Now that wasnt the Royal Purple's fault, it was my fault. THIS TIME, I will put in the Redline SI-1.. because it may work a touch better than the Royal Purple. It also costs $5 less, so, WIN! :)

I can't give you MPG differences, but, cars I have used it in, that seem to run smoother EVEN WITH AS LITTLE AS 1oz. PUT IN THE GAS TANK! READ THE DOSING! -YOU ONLY NEED TO PUT IN 1 ounce or so, maybe 3oz to make you feel better but that is maybe a waste, to CLEAN THE FUEL SYSTEM-- - Cars I have used it in, partial list because I honestly do not remember all the cars:

1) 1995 Ford Taurus GL, 3.0L Vulcan, likely was a flood car, 182,000 or so miles. Could me a nice car but this one looked nice and was in good cosmetic condition with cold AC.. but was a piece of **** otherwise. Strike One for Taurus. I also had a 99 Sable that was perfect.. RAN BETTER ON FUEL SYSTEM TREATMENT OF REDLINE, JUST SMOOTHER. YOU CAN NOTICE IT IF YOU ARE TUNED TO HOW THE CARS RUNS BEFORE/AFTER WITH A TRAINED EAR AND A FEEL FOR THE CAR AND SOMETIMES TAKE NOTICE OF HOW THE CAR DRIVES WITH THE RADIO OFF AND HOW IT FEELS AND SHIFTS, PERHAPS. JUST SMOOTHER. SAME WAY WHEN YOU CHANGE OIL OR TIRES. YOU CAN TELL. *Car is gone.
2) 2000 Volvo V70 XC AWD, ~131,000, 2.4L Turbo I5 - SAME. RAN REAL NICE ON THE REDLINE IN THE TANK. *Car is gone. And no, it wasn't the fuel injectors. Made me love and appreciate Volvos and all other finer cars, this car. Or most of. Some finer cars suck lol. Something about driver error...
3) 1993 Chevrolet (get ready for it) "S10 Blazer Tahoe LT." Unknown mileage; engines switched due to issues (?) . RUNS LIKE A DREAM ON REDLINE. RUNS PRETTY GOOD ON GUMOUT TOO BUT REDLINE HAS THE EDGE. *Car is sitting, waiting for work. Going full build with it.
4) 1999 Volvo V70 XC AWD, 168,850 miles, - SAME AS THE YEAR 2000 VERSION. *The Redline is going into this car. 3oz initial treatment, though I only need to put in 1oz.. maybe I will.
5) 2003 GMC Envoy XL. 167,500 miles; 4.2I Vortec 4200. This car is abused by its mechanic, with overpriced brand new tires and 10W-40 motor oil as well as Lucas oil (straight 80 weight....... !!!!!!) when it says 5W-30 on the cap. Think about that. 5W-30 RIGHT ON THE CA.. No, er are going two or three times as thick, and calling it "better." WHAT??????????? Aint 1960 or 1970 anymore... Anyways... RUNS NICE AND SMOOTH ON THE REDLINE. NO OTHER CLEANERS USED.

So, there you have it. This is why I will ONLY buy:

1) Gumout at WALMART; It costs less, and is readily available;
2) Royal Purple MaxCLEAN; This is the hardest to justify, as it costs $5 more than SI-1, has perhaps slightly not as good results, and I ran out of gas when I put it in. So I couldnt evaluate it properly.. If it runs out of gas after I put it in a half tank I am going to be a complaining consumer to the BBB but lol that wont happen... I will try that one again too, in time, with money...
3) So far, the best of the three: This Redline SI-1.
^^ This was aimed at some of the posters that leave STUPID reviews! Like "My car ran out of gas. 1 star." These are the "bad review trolls" and they need to be shot and executed by the police in the street in a public forum, like Rome and stuff. These are bad people, these trolls. They need love. And they need Jesus. But notice I am not giving a product a one-star review because I ran out of gas. Take heed, lemmings.

:)

And, one more thing before I hit "Submit" or "Preview my review:" PEA cleans like dishes in a dishwasher. It breaks down any dirt and stuff in fuel system, and carries it away to combustion. IT DOES NOT CLOG FUEL FILTERS. Now, sure, if your fuel filter is clogged.. Will it carry stuff from it to injectors? NO! Why? because it DISSOLVES IT. Then it goes with fuel flow. So, if using in a dirty system: USE A LOT!! USE the 3 ounces or so! GIVE IT ENOUGH TO DISSOLVE THE DEBRIS AND DIRT YOU EXPECT ARE THERE! Or, better yet, change the fuel filter. It is a little tricky and you must be careful, but on a lot of cars its easy, if its not then again: CLEANER!! :)

This product will clean injectors, improve spray patterns, maybe increase VOLUME of fuel to the engine, and clean up "Ethanol poop," gas sucks nowadays, and you are a fool if you are saying that gas doesnt leave the ethanol gummy stuff in its effort to be cheapened for maximum profit, winter-blend gas (the worst,) etc. Ethanol eats rubber and isnt good for fuel systems, so why is it in gas????........... Anyways.. Cleaners DO have a purpose.. Sure, YOUR CAR WILL RUN ON JUST GASOLINE but me myself, I believe in these products that address specific things that were overlooked in the inherent design of "just normal gas delivery."

Did you like or dislike my review? I tried to make minimal, or no, typos. Firefox helped by having everything underlined in red that it didnt recognize, and I scanned it twice.. Let me know! :)
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on March 18, 2010
My '06 Civic SI has about 40,000 miles on it. It had been getting around 22 mpg (mostly city driving) but even with long distance freeway driving (around 75mph) I'd only get about 23 mpg. I usually use Chevron or Shell gas. I also have used Techron fuel cleaner in the past with no results.

So I used Red Line SI-1 a few tanks ago, and my gas mileage has increased to about 26 mpg for my last few tanks. Right now I'm at 318 miles on one tank of gas, and i have one bar left on my fuel gauge (it's digital). Prior to the Red Line the best I'd ever gotten was 312 on one tank of gas, and that was after driving the ENTIRE tank on the freeway, and driving 10 miles with no bars left on the fuel gauge. Typically I would get 250-270 miles on one tank.

I'm stoked!

I will admit that using this stuff ain't going to do anything to help you if your injectors aren't clogged... but if you suspect they are, this is the fuel cleaner to get!
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on November 27, 2012
Gotta give credit where it's due!

Wifey's car had a light ping/knock under throttle, so looked into Sefoam, etc. I am generally not a fan of the various `snake oil' products and do not routinely use any of them.

But I had read on forums of good results using various injector cleaners and such, so gave it a little research.

I've had good results with other Redline products so decided to give this bottle of joy a try.

Results were impressive and unexpected

One - ran 6oz in about a gallon of gas in the wife's car - Protégé5, 2.0l 4 banger, 125k+ miles. Knock went away within a few miles, quite impressive.

Two - ran 1oz in 3oz fuel through 2 identical 15yr old 2stroke motors (weedeater/edger). I'd taken care of them over the years but never did a carb rebuild or anything. Carb screws had been adjusted way out over the years to get them to run. They were running, but very rough. Both motors started smoking like heck, birds falling out of the sky. It cleared out after a few minutes and kid you not, both are now running almost like new. I had to completely re-adjust the carb screws almost back to factory stock.

Three - ran 6oz in the last gal of gas in my 1990 Mazda RX7. The traditional hot start issue (large, slightly leaky injectors flooding the engine) almost 100% gone! Now that was weird. Injectors have 4yrs and 8k since clean and balance, hot starting had been getting problematic. Folks do all kinds of things to these cars to work around the hot start issue, but this was sure easy.

I've not checked MPG change on either vehicle so no feedback there. ALL FOUR engines showed noticeable, quantitative benefit from use.

Recommended!!
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on December 22, 2009
I can echo what Glenn said in his review. I started using fi cleaners back in the early 80's. A new Volvo 242 I had purchased new was starting to perform sluggishly. Another owner recommended a fi cleaner which I tried and it worked pretty well. Over the past 28 years I've tried just about everything on the market. Some worked well, others didn't. The Red Line SI-1 works better than the others I've tried. The BG cleaner works well too, but at three times the cost.
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on November 20, 2014
If you want to really clean out your fuel system this is the way to go. It contains the most PEA of any cleaner on the market and PEA is what you want. As quoted in Road & Track:

"PEA is the cleaning agent found in any truly effective complete fuel system cleaner. It is the strongest cleaning agent available in fuel additives. It cleans better and cleans more parts than PIB and PIBA. PEA is in a league of its own and in some cases it is the only detergent that can get the job done."

This product contains 30-50% PEA as per the current MSDS. Google it and you'll see.

Techron used to contain PEA but now uses Stoddard Solvent instead, which is basically paint thinner.

Lots of debates out there in the auto world on what additives are worth while and which are snake oil. When in doubt, do some research and then look at the MSDS and find out exactly what is in the additive you buy.

As an example, Royal Purple's equivalent which costs about the same ounce for ounce contains 5-15% PEA. Lucas Oil's Deep Clean 10-30% PEA.

Bottom line is know what you are paying for when it comes to any automotive additive.
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on August 22, 2015
I have a 2005 Toyota Sienna with 202K miles. The dash warning lights have been on for a while. The OBD-2 read at three different shops indicated that the two catalytic converters needed to be replaced. Bids ran from $1050 to $1800. Not what I wanted to hear. I decided to gamble with some sort of fuel system/exhaust cleaner, figuring there was little downside. After researching products on Amazon, I decided to go with Red Line Complete SI-1 Fuel System Cleaner. I added it to a full tank of regular gas, about 22 gal., and low and behold, after 100 miles of driving, the warning lights went out, and have not been back on. I imagine there was some carbon buildup in the catalytic converters hindering flow, and this product took care of the problem. Needless to say, I am impressed.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 29, 2010
In short, I put two bottles into my car and the mileage went up about 10%, which I am very happy with.

Long version:

I have a 2004 Infiniti G35 Coupe 6 Speed (Manual) that now has about 76000 miles on it. The car has some modifications (cool air intake, lightweight pulleys, lightweight flywheel) that could affect fuel mileage, but theoretically they shouldn't (or at least not much). All maintenance is done on time - car is well taken care of.

Either way, my car is rated to 19/26 city/hwy, and I drive a combination of approximately 35%/65% city/hwy (this is actually conservative, the highway distance is probably more), but was only managing 17.5-18mpg per tank on average. I never expect to get the full EPA ratings since I drive faster than 65 on the highway and don't have a feather light foot when driving around town, but I didn't expect it to be THAT bad.

So I was reading around on the multiple car forums I'm on, and was recommended this stuff. So I went ahead and bought 3 bottles of this stuff. I put one in our truck (2009 Dodge Ram 1500 w/ Hemi) and 2 bottles in my G35 (I put one in when I filled up, and the second the next time I filled up).

With my driving style being the same, my mileage has gone up now to about 19.5-20mpg, which is a pretty solid 10% increase. I held off on posting but I've put at least 20 tanks through my car since I used this stuff and the mileage increase is holding steady (if not getting better). As far as I know I have not done anything else differently that may skew my results.

I haven't been monitoring the truck's mileage and since it gets driven by many different people I can't comment on the difference on that vehicle, but so far it's made a difference on my car. I'll probably end up throwing a bottle or two of this stuff into my car every 5-10K miles. Before anyone argues that you spend more money that way, at the mileage increase I got, I'm saving nearly 28 gallons of fuel every 5000 miles. Gas costs about 3.25 a gallon where I live (car takes premium) so that's over 90 bucks worth saved for spending 10-20 bucks on this stuff. Seems logical to me.
0Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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