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Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods and Faith Paperback – December 20, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Hank Fox Books (December 20, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615429904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615429908
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,488,713 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A former draft horse teamster and cowboy, Hank Fox has been kicked, stepped on, knocked down, bitten, and bucked off by horses. (Fortunately, there were those other times when he got along with horses just fine, and even stayed in the saddle.) Growing up in Texas with a bunch of rodeo cowboys and rednecks, roping calves and quarter horses, his early blue collar work history included driving a dump truck and soda delivery truck, working as a framing carpenter, and work as a roofer and roofing company foreman. Later he served as a mule packer, ranch hand and wilderness horseback ride guide in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. He drove hay wagons and sleighs professionally for 8 years, hitchhiked around the United States more than 26,000 miles, and even once hopped a ride on a freight train. Older now, he does a lot of his work indoors – but claims he can still saddle a horse and find his way in the wilderness, hitch up a team and get a wagon safely there and back, work cattle in the chute, hook up a two-horse trailer and tow it down the highway, and maybe even diamond-hitch a pack on a mule for a wilderness trip. Raised in a household with a Jehovah’s Witness father and a Southern Baptist mom, he started to have doubts about religion by the time he was 13. It took him 20 years to figure it all out, but he ended being a confirmed atheist, and later even an antitheist — which he describes as, “Not only do I not believe in supernatural superbeings, but I don’t think you should either.” A lifelong writer and journal-keeper, he started jotting down his thoughts and ideas on religion and atheism in private, later graduated to blogging, and eventually began to imagine writing a book on the subject. That book became “Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods & Faith.” Today he lives on what was once a farm and egg ranch in Upstate New York, only a short walk from a clear stream, with red foxes, wild turkeys and deer for neighbors. He makes his living through writing and, still true to his blue collar roots, rather annoyingly menial work in a supermarket bakery.

More About the Author

A former draft horse teamster and cowboy, Hank Fox has been kicked, stepped on, knocked down, bitten, and bucked off by horses. (Fortunately, there were those other times when he got along with horses just fine, and even stayed in the saddle.)

Growing up in Texas with a bunch of rodeo cowboys and rednecks, roping calves and quarter horses, his early work history included driving a dump truck and soda delivery truck, working as a framing carpenter, and work as a roofer and roofing company foreman. Later he served as a mule packer, ranch hand and wilderness horseback ride guide in California's Sierra Nevada mountains. He drove hay wagons and sleighs professionally for 8 years, worked spring brandings at local ranches, and even rode a few bulls.

Older now, he does a lot of his work indoors - but claims he can still saddle a horse and find his way in the wilderness, hitch up a team and get a wagon safely there and back, work cattle in the chute, hook up a two-horse trailer and tow it down the highway, and maybe even diamond-hitch a pack on a mule for a wilderness trip.

Raised in a household with a Jehovah's Witness father and a Southern Baptist mother, he started to have doubts about religion by the time he was 13. It took him 20 years to figure it all out, but he ended being a confirmed atheist, and later even an antitheist -- which he describes as, "Not only do I not believe in supernatural superbeings, but I don't think you should either."

A lifelong writer and journal-keeper, he started jotting down his thoughts and ideas on religion and atheism in private, later graduated to blogging, and eventually began to imagine writing a book on the subject. That book became "Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods & Faith."

Today he lives on what was once an egg farm in Upstate New York, only a short walk from a clear stream, with red foxes, raccoons, wild turkeys and whitetail deer.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By a rational reader on January 7, 2011
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An easy, enjoyable read filled with practical wisdom and fresh metaphors that examine and explain a key dilemma of our age: the need to be rational in the face of religious fervor. Fox writes clearly and sincerely, with a sense of humor and many original ideas to add to the canon of recent god-free writing, such as that by Sam Harris and Richard Dawkins. He joins them in encouraging any and all rational beings to free themselves from the shackles of "goddiness," offering a road map of his own personal growth and process of discovery. Highly recommended.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Milton E. Anglin on January 11, 2011
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This is a easy read, full of common sense opinions and explanations about religion, morality and faith. I have read Dawkins, Hitchens, Harris and others. Hank Fox doesn't try to talk over your head. He tells it in plain concise terms. It is like talking to a brother or friend. Whether you are a confirmed atheist, like I am, on the fence or just curious I highly recommend this book. You might find yourself sleeping in on Sundays. It could change your life.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 26, 2011
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I have really enjoyed reading this book.

Blue Collar Atheist aptly uses of analogies to explain how it feels to be an atheist and what we find so lacking in the beliefs others so easily assume, drawing me in and keeping me reading. By the time I got to chapter 2: "The Parable of the M&Ms", I was hooked. This is a friendly book which delivers the good news of atheism with a wonderful folksy charm. I was laughing at unexpected metaphors as the book touched on important issues with seriousness, but never approaches believers with condescension or derision. I'm considering giving this book to my religious family to explain how it feels to be an atheist.

Dennet and Harris, move over. Atheism has a real horseman now.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By B. Centre on March 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
A long time atheist and realist raised in a non-religious family, I was fortunate to have avoided the mind indoctrination that is belief in the supernatural, AKA religion. My hat goes off to those who were less lucky and who had to discover reality largely on their own. Such is the case with this author, and it makes a compelling read.

While there are a number of authors who have described their journey into realism, few I have read are told by blue collar the common man in common language. Employing easily understood parables to better put his concept and positions into perspective, Mr. Fox's explanations for how and why he became a freethinker are compelling. His style comes across both respectful and avuncular.

While i enjoyed it, this book's real value is in it's ability to communicate directly to the believer; specifically, those who are on the fence and struggling with coming to terms with the conflict between 21st century reality, logic and self reliance and the fantasy world inflicted on him/her at an early age by well meaning parents and clergy.

Giving this book to a Christian friend in such conflict may be the biggest favor you ever do for them.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By MikeTheInfidel on February 22, 2011
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You don't have to be a genius or a philosopher to be an atheist, and in his book "Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods and Faith", Hank Fox doesn't waste time nitpicking the finer details of complicated theology. He gets right to the point, telling everyone that no matter how much his followers discuss the finer points of the embroidery on his robes, the emperor really is naked after all. His writing is accessible, blunt, and honest, and will resonate strongly with anyone who has ever had their doubts about the big guy in the sky. Through a combination of no-nonsense rhetoric and personal anecdotes, Fox puts up a strong defense for godlessness and doesn't pull any punches in its disdain for the limits that religion tries to put on our outlook on the world. We may already have the 'four horsemen' of atheism, but Hank Fox leads the pack as its first honest-to-goodness cowboy.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Lawson on June 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
Everyone should have an uncle like Hank Fox. While reading, what he was saying was everything I thought Jack Palance was insinuating in the scene from "City Slickers" when he held up his finger to Billy Crystal. That's the only way I think I can describe the wisdom of Hank Fox. That "one thing" that Palance was getting at is what happens when an open mind meets an open door.

THOMAS LAWSON, author of "Letters from an Atheist Nation"
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