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Red Road from Stalingrad: Reflections of a Soviet Infantryman (Stackpole Military History Series) Paperback – November 10, 2008


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$14.25 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Red Road from Stalingrad: Reflections of a Soviet Infantryman (Stackpole Military History Series) + In Deadly Combat: A German Soldier's Memoir of the Eastern Front (Modern War Studies) + Blood Red Snow: The Memoirs of a German Soldier on the Eastern Front
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

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About the Author

Mansur Abdulin was born in Siberia and volunteered for the Red Army in June 1942. Wounded at the Dnieper River, he worked as a miner after the war and now lives in the Ural Mountains.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books (November 10, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811735095
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811735094
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #431,092 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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4 star
25%
3 star
17%
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See all 12 customer reviews
This is a tiny sample of the details found in the book.
Hans Beerbaum
The book is written in such a way that the reader is sitting in the room with the author, listening to his recollections of these experiences.
B. Gentry
I recommend the purchase and reading of this book as the writting is pleasant and the account is interesting and well detailed.
Stéphane Gamet

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John P. Ford on June 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
From the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk, to the banks of the Dnieper River, This Memoir presents the author's experiences and observations as a 19-year-old frontline infantryman in the Soviet Red Army. The hatred and violence that had erupted on the Eastern Front was generated largely by Hitler's declared intention of annihilating the Soviet Union. Aware of the odds against survival, Abdulin's main goal was to kill as many enemy soldiers as possible. This saga commences with his first shot on the Don Front in November, 1942.

As the Soviet infantry advanced toward Stalingrad, trained dogs carrying 18 lb explosive charges were sent out to destroy enemy tanks. In the heat of battle, a wounded comrade was seen to cut off his dangling leg. Another, with both arms blown off, yelled for a smoke. But Stalin's Order 227 - No Retreat - created a firm bond between the comrades who knew that the alternative was death. In the trenches, living conditions were deplorable. At minus 40 degrees, many soldiers suffocated from toxic fumes in the shell craters where they slept. Snow-covered manure pits were warmer and safer. Hunger, cold, constant lack of sleep, and continuous hard work took their toll. Worse by far were the infestations of lice, which were regarded as enemy No. 1; the Germans were enemy No. 2.

Having no food for 10 days turned the comrades into walking skeletons. They lived on boiled horse fodder that often gave them intense pain while defecating. For good luck, each comrade carried a mascot, and loss of the mascot was seen as an omen of death. Soldiers who stole watches from dead Germans seemed to get killed in battle. Cowards also seemed to perish.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sci-fi and history reader on February 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
The author states his personal memories of fighting in World War 2 as a Soviet Infantryman, having first fired his weapon in combat on 6 November 1942, and last shot on 28 November 1943. Due to the need of raw materials, the author was exempt from conscription (draft) in being a skilled Siberian miner. He still volunteered and eventually was allowed to enter the Soviet Army at 18 years old and became a mortar man. After his critical wound, he eventually recovered and returned to the mines.

The book provides viewpoints from the first person perspective with some additional historical background added in to provide insight into the bigger picture of how he and his unit fit into the battle. His unit took part of the winter offensive that surrounded Stalingrad and later counterattacked north of Kursk in the summer offensive.

The book provides a unique insight into the Soviet military, how their battalion level supply system worked in providing food and ammunition to the front line companies. Also presented is how their awards were presented, "donations" to the state were collected and not sent in, replacements assigned to the platoons, and what life was as a front line soldier.

Other books such as Infantry Aces and Panzer Aces provide company level viewpoints from the German perspective. These books described the amazement on how the Soviets would attack in mass waves, wondering how the Soviets could repeatedly do so.

The author describes entering villages that were destroyed by the retreating Nazis, who executed the old and young indiscriminately. This evil senseless killing angered the Soviets into pushing harder and willing to sacrifice themselves to avenge the innocent civilians massacred.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David L. Dunagin on July 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a first hand account by a private in the Red Army fighting near Stalingrad, through Kursk and the Ukraine. Mansur is born in 1923, the son of a Communist Party Member who is a technician at a mine; later on Mansur works at the mine also. When the Nazis attack in June 1941, he and three friends who are all exempt from military service as miners, eventually manage to enlist. At school he is selected to stay on as a Lieutenant and instructor but he does not want that. Given an opportunity, he is sent to the front as a private where he is assigned to an 82MM Mortar section. Being a member of the Young Communist League, he is given the duty of keeping records of other party members in his company. His unit is sent to help circle the Germans at Stalingrad and he ends up fighting in the city. After that battle his unit ends up at Kursk. He becomes a Komsorg, basically the senior NCO of the Battalion, whose duty is to be the first man to lead the attack, a position that has a life expectancy of less than 2 weeks. Seriously wounded in November, 1943 he spends the rest of the war in hospital and recovery then ends up back at a mine.
This book reminded me of Guy Sajer's The Forgotten Soldier, or With the Old Breed. Mansur has written what he remembers and historians can quibble with some of it, but it is a pleasure to read because it is such a rarity for a Russian Private to have written about his experiences. I gave this book 4 out of 5 stars because of the lack of detailed maps showing where he fought. As a combat vet I was able to identify with his thoughts and experiences in battle. A worthy read in my opinion.
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Red Road from Stalingrad: Reflections of a Soviet Infantryman (Stackpole Military History Series)
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