Redbelt 2008 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(95) IMDb 6.8/10
Available in HD

REDBELT is the story of Mike Terry (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a Jiu-Jitsu master who has avoided the prize fighting circuit, choosing instead to pursue an honorable life by operating a self-defense studio with a samurai's code. An accident on a dark, rainy night at Terry's studio between an off-duty officer and a distraught lawyer (Emily Mortimer) puts in motion a series of events that will change ...

Starring:
Chiwetel Ejiofor, Tim Allen
Runtime:
1 hour 40 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Redbelt

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Product Details

Genres Sports, Drama
Director David Mamet
Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Tim Allen
Supporting actors Chiwetel Ejiofor, Alice Braga, Jose Pablo Cantillo, Emily Mortimer, Cathy Cahlin Ryan, Luciana Souza, Cyril Takayama, Scott Barry, Ricky Jay, Randy Couture, John Machado, Rodrigo Santoro, Ricardo Wilke, Caroline de Souza Correa, Tim Allen, Jack Wallace, Jake Johnson, Dennis Keiffer
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Great story, great acting, and some cool martial arts and fight scenes.
Jeff Van Gastel
Similar to other Mamet works such as Spartan, the film does suffer from some convoluted storytelling and ridiculous plot twists that defy any sensible logic.
Maxwell
The movie centers around Mike Terry a well respected Jiu-Jitsu instructor who lives his life by a code of honor, respect , and discipline.
fmwaalex

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Shashank Tripathi on July 22, 2008
Format: DVD
You can hardly go wrong with someone who has given us the insouciant variety of Glengarry Glen Ross or Wag the Dog. Redbelt is a classic of the same cadre, hands-down the best martial arts movie you have seen in a decade, if not the very best of all time.

Without any flying dragons or crouching whatchamaycallits, mind you. Without even the guttaral shrieks of your standard issue kung-fu flick. So don't be going seeing it expecting your typical jumping jacks and shenanigans from Hong Kong.

It starts in what looks like your average ramshackle dojo teaching Brazilian Judo tricks. The authenticity of the maneuvers is instructive, and gripping. But this soon builds into a thrilling rumination of our common human tussle between staying true to our integrity and giving in to the practical conveniences of the moment.

The screenplay is vintage Mamet. We get a steady dose of one-liners ("I don't teach people to fight. I teach them to prevail.") The narrative offers some unexpected twists but exhibits a gentle unaffected beauty, an austerity that seems almost effortless. You'll watch it in one swoop.

For some inadequately explored reason Amazon and various other sources insist on billing this as a Tim Allen starrer, which is puzzling. He fritters a guest appearance at best (what happened--not enough dates?) and is basically quickly forgotten.

See it instead for the irrepressible tenacity of Ejiofor.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By the pegasus on May 12, 2008
REDBELT is a mesmerizing tour de force. There are so many story elements intricately tied together. Causal action relationships bump up against arbitrary chance events. The honor code of the Samurai warrior meets up and does battle with the criminal scams of a greedy Hollywood film and sports culture. Mamet frames his film with the world of martial arts and yet it is at the same time the classic Greek warrior's noble struggle, "arête", which thus becomes a fascinating fusion of Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The jiu-jitsu instructor's (Mike Terry) caveats to his students in the opening scene in how to marshal their forces and extricate themselves from entrapment by their opponent ("There is always a way out, you just have to find it") all return to test him as the movie unfolds and he becomes ensnared in the dishonorable world which surrounds him. The acting throughout is marvelous with a cast that reflects Mamet's refined sense of individual characters. Chiwetel Ejiofor is superb. While he dominates the film, the other members of the cast are more than impressive, especially Ricky Jay who plays a scumbag fight promoter. If I were to have any criticism, it would be that Mamet sometimes moves too quickly in the exposition of his "magnificent puzzle" and at times during the film, I felt a bit frustrated and confused. But that is a small price to pay for such a challenging artistic experience. The camera work is fascinating. Mamet uses lots of unusual close-up shots, not just of faces but also segments of the landscape in which significant action is occurring. It's a very painterly approach to film. This is a film that stimulates one to see it several more times, hopefully on the big screen. I've not elaborated on any specific scenes, as I don't wish to spoil the challenging denouement of the film. REDBELT is brilliant filmmaking.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Maxwell on May 14, 2008
Redbelt is a the best martial arts movie I've seen in quite a long time. There's not a great deal of action in it, but it explores the philosophy and principles behind the main character's (Mike Terry) Jiu Jitsu training/teaching. He's a man who lives by a warrior code, and tries to uphold such principles as honor, loyalty, and integrity inside and outside his gym. In the end, the movie is not about Terry's physical fighting, but about his personal struggle to survive and succeed in a modern world that does not seem to share or reward his values.

Be warned that any casual fan of action flicks who goes into this film expecting a lot of over the top butt kicking and spectacular Jackie Chan-esque fight sequences will be sorely disappointed. There are no acrobatic stunts or flying tornado kicks here. The few fight sequences there are in the film mostly involve Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. And even in a choreographed fight scene, real Jiu Jitsu technique is not the prettiest thing to look at from the perspective of a casual observer. However, those who have some knowledge and appreciation of martial arts will greatly appreciate the realism and expertise demonstrated in Redbelt's fight scenes. Another treat for martial artists and MMA fans is that many small roles in the film are played by world reknowned fighters and masters such as Randy Couture, Enson Inoue, the Machados, Ray Mancini, and Dan Inosanto.

Redbelt is not perfect by any means. Similar to other Mamet works such as Spartan, the film does suffer from some convoluted storytelling and ridiculous plot twists that defy any sensible logic. The ending seems like a lazy cop out, and offers no resolution for all the issues that Mamet confusingly brought up earlier in the film.
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