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Reefs and Shoals: An Alan Lewrie Naval Adventure (Alan Lewrie Naval Adventures) Hardcover – January 17, 2012


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Product Details

  • Series: Alan Lewrie Naval Adventures (Book 18)
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; First American Edition edition (January 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312595719
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312595715
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #246,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In the latest Alan Lewrie adventure, set in 1805, the British naval captain is issued new orders: take his ship, HMS Reliant, to the Bahamas, there to engage French and Spanish privateers that are preying on friendly convoys. The novel, as with previous entries in the series, is a hugely entertaining naval adventure (á la Forester and O’Brian) with a different kind of protagonist. Lewrie isn’t your typical career navy man but rather a bit of a gadabout, a womanizer, a lover of fine foods and warm clothes, whose naval career is based more on a love of adventure than any sense of patriotic duty to his country. The novel is written as though it were a contemporary account, with era-appropriate word spellings (“damme,” “fourty”), slang, and dialogue (“Cap’um’s on deck!”). Not merely a worthy entry in the very popular Lewrie series but a top-of-the-line naval adventure that can be thoroughly enjoyed by readers who’ve never met Captain Lewrie until now. --David Pitt

Review

Praise for Reefs and Shoals:

"Check the log, shipmate: Dewey Lambdin has left Alexander Kent and C.S. Forester hull-down in an ocean of words and is closing on Patrick O'Brian as the most prolific historical novelist to celebrate a Royal Navy mariner during the age of sail."--Washington Times

"Lewrie's a worthy shipmate for Aubrey and Hornblower."--Kirkus Reviews

"Lambdin succeeds with high-seas action, bravado, and Lewrie’s characteristic antics, putting himself in good company with Julian Stockwin and Seth Hunter as worthy successors to the popular 18th- and 19th-century naval adventures of Forester, Kent, and Pope. ... Lewrie is a delightfully randy and irreverent character, the perfect man to walk the quarterdeck of a Royal Navy frigate."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"A hugely entertaining naval adventure (á la Forester and O’Brian) with a different kind of protagonist. ... Not merely a worthy entry in the very popular Lewrie series but a top-of-the-line naval adventure that can be thoroughly enjoyed by readers who’ve never met Captain Lewrie until now."--Booklist

"Naval adventures in the time of wooden ships and iron men form a distinct literary genre. Nashville novelist Dewey Lambdin has mastered it."--Chapter 16

"Dewey Lambdin may well be the best author of Age of Sail fiction currently practicing the art. ... Lambdin's writing skills are a perfect for his research. His well-chosen words capture the feel, the tang, almost the taste of the moment. His characters are immensely believable, either drawn from the pages of history or evocative of the cads, scamps, and occasional good friends that we mee in life. ... Let none have uncertainties about Dewey Lambdin or his Alan Lewire: 'hearts of oak' both! Reefs and Shoals (and the entire series of novels) is heartily recommended to lubbers and sailors alike.)"--United States Naval Institute

Praise for the Alan Lewrie Series:


“The brilliantly stylish American master of salty-tongued British naval tales."--Kirkus Reviews

"You could get addicted to this series. Easily."--The New York Times Book Review

“The best naval adventure series since C. S. Forester.”--Library Journal

“Stunning naval adventure, reeking of powder and mayhem. I wish I had written this series.” --Bernard Cornwell

“Lewrie is a marvelous creation, resourceful and bold.”--James L. Nelson, author of the Revolution at Sea Saga

"Lewrie is an endearing character-hero, philanderer, smuggler, spy: a courageous naval officer unencumbered by high morals or indecision."--Publishers Weekly


More About the Author

Dewey Lambdin is the author of fourteen previous Alan Lewrie novels. A member of the U.S. Naval Institute and a Friend of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England, he spends his free time working and sailing (he's been a sailor since 1976). He makes his home in Nashville, Tennessee, but would much prefer Margaritaville or Murrell's Inlet.

Customer Reviews

Good plot, strong characters and a fast paced story.
Richard Schwein Sr.
The book also attempts to cover too long a period--or perhaps that impression results from, again, poor editing.
Bernard D. Cole
For those of you who like rousing sea action from the age of sail, you will enjoy this series.
Paul Carroll

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By pbk63 on January 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I looked forward to this book after having read all the previous books in the series. While historically of interest, it lacked the intensity of the prior books and by the time I finished I was glad to be at the end. It was worth a read but was disappointing after having enjoyed the rest of the series and compared to those previous books. Look forward to the next book and hope it returns to the level of the prior work. For the moment am enjoying the William Hammond series which makes an interesting comparison to those who enjoy the likes of Alexander Kent, Dudley Pope and of course CS Forester and the Hornbower series. As one interested in the days of sail I am always on the look out for new authors and series of historical novels of the era. Wish I could give this higher marks but afraid I cannot. It has moments but unfortunately they are between long passages that are just not that interesting. Still worth reading, however.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Capt Morgan on January 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Having read all, and enjoyed most, of the Alan Lewrie novels this one falls to the bottom of the pile. Mr Lambdin seems to have just mailed this one in. No less than 5 previous characters from many years in the past make cameo appearances. Which allows Mr Lambdin to fill in page after page after page catching new readers up on how our Hero met and knew these characters. This then allows the author to add a few new, meaniless, pages to several already page skipping chapters. In the time it takes to renew these old aquintances, retell their stories, then add a little something to the story line a new character could easily have been introduced and developed. But that would require time and thought by the Author and would be harder work than just mailing it in.

What is lacking the most from so many of Mr. Lambdin's novels are what other characters think of our Hero. We get to meet his son for the first time after he ran away to sea. 1 page of dialog between the two is about all we get. Nothing about what Sewallis thinks or feels about his father, or the new woman our Hero is wooing. Nothing about what Lydia thinks about our hero or how their relationship is going, or where she wants it to go. There are many conversations with Alan's first officer over the period of months at sea, yet nothing about what the first officer thinks of his Captain. This lack of depth of supporting characters is very annoying. "The Invasion Year" (Lambdin's last novel) was enjoyable because we got to see into Lydia's mind and how she felt about herself and our hero, not just what our Hero thinks and interprets of her. Without that insite the "Invasion Year" would have been just as forgettable as 90% of this novel is......

Mr. Lambdin you are a better author than this. Please develope your main supporting characters more!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Red on February 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Compared to his previous novels, this was incredibly slow paced! To the point of boring in sections that appear to include details to increase page count rather than the story. Almost seems written by another author. I was disappointed.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Logan on December 4, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read a number of nautical fiction series writers and the two who entertain me the most and I hold in the highest regard are Dewey Lambdin and Patrick O'Brian. Each of them have developed magnificent main characters. O'Brian developed a hero with flaws and Lambdin created a flawed human who has risen to command and done heroic deeds. I recently completed a 30 year career in the US Navy and the only writer I've found who captures the essence of a Naval Sailor is Dewey Lambdin. I am impressed with Lambdin's knowledge of the sea, sailing, tall ships, the human condition and the period of his setting. He is one of my all-time favorite writers.

Reefs and Shoals: Alan Lewrie has an annoying habit of never growing as a human and seems perpetually lost in self-indulgence to the detriment of everyone who he is associated with. Lewrie is the kind of character you want to reach out and shake some sense into his sometimes wee brain. When I've become most frustrated with him I remind myself that I can't recall a character or story I've become more attached to or invested in. Lambdin flawlessly wraps the reader in the time and place in such a way that I don't notice the effort I believe it must take for me not to feel like he is trying to beat me over the head with scenery or ambiance.

Although I have such regard for Lambdin's writing I can say that all of the rehashing of previous story line so the reader who inattentively jumps in at the last book will not be lost is the only device in his writing that completely drags my immersion to a grinding halt. If Mr. Lambdin happens to read this review I would suggest that it is safe to allow that old character to appear as if they were new to the reader who isn't acquainted with the rest of the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Shedno on June 12, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lambdin never disappoints! I have read just about everything that he has written and have always enjoyed them. It is difficult to have to wait for his next story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By George on March 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mr. Lambin delivers as promised in this novel. A good read in the C. S. Forester tradition with a character with more than a touch of Flash (apologies to George M Fraser ) who can be a hero and a cad.

I was worried our Captain Lewrie would be getting long in the tooth, but like the bunny he keeps going.
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