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Reel Injun


List Price: $29.95
Price: $18.45 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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$18.45 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


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Product Details

  • Actors: Clint Eastwood, Adam Beach, Jim Jarmusch, Graham Greene, Wes Studi
  • Directors: Neil Diamond
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Lorber Films
  • DVD Release Date: November 29, 2011
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005J7K9BO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,393 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

An entertaining and provocative look at Hollywood's depiction of Native Americans, Reel Injun journeys through a century of cinema to set the record straight. Traveling through the heartland of the U.S., to the Black Hills and Monument Valley, Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond examines how the myth of the movie ''Injun'' has influenced the world's understanding - and misunderstanding - of Natives. With clips from hundreds of classic and recent films, it is a remarkable feat of historical research, documenting the shift from nuanced silent-era heroes to the Western's ''Noble savage'' stereotype, leading up to the bourgeoning Native independent scene of Smoke Signals and The Fast Runner. Containing candid interviews with celebrated directors, writers, actors and activists, including Clint Eastwood (Million Dollar Baby), Robbie Robertson (The Last Waltz), Sacheen Littlefeather, John Trudell, and Russell Means, Reel Injun is an insightful and essential compendium for understanding the racial politics of Hollywood and the continuing artistic vibrancy of Native peoples.

Customer Reviews

Give it a shot if you want to really, REALLY know the truth.
Brave Woman
A good preliminary exploration of Native Americans as portrayed by Hollywood.
George R Harpster
They were a stereotypical mixture of the worst sort I've ever seen!
Carlisle Wheeling

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Feather on February 13, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Being part Native American, I get tired of the images Hollywood have created. I teach Native American history and the great diversity among the tribes. I have to first unteach what Hollywood portrayed. This DVD is honest and informative. I wished this could be shown in all the schools.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By N. Winkler on February 19, 2011
Format: DVD
Reviews the American Indian and other indiginous people in film making beginning with silent movies, how the white man portrayed the Indian from early times up to present day interpretations at the movies. It will make you think twice about the message conveyed in some of those old western favorites you watch over and over. There is commentary by today's Indians who are actors, producers and filmmakers. Nicely done, and yes with humor included. A story that was waiting to be told.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By KPL on May 19, 2012
Format: DVD
This documentary isn't as deep as it could be, but it is very illuminating and entertaining. It is a fantastic blend of commentary, film clips, humor, and history. I showed this documentary to a room of teenagers and adults. They were all focused and absorbed by it (which, if you work with youth, you know is quite an accomplishment!). The film provoked several good conversations.

I highly recommend this film, especially to start some discussion.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery Mingo on February 14, 2012
Format: DVD
If you like documentaries about the representations of people of color in film (e.g., "Fade to Black," "The Slanted Screen," or "The Bronze Screen"), then you will like this.

This documentary shows mostly Native American film critics analyzing depictions of Native Americans in film. This moves from nickelodeon images to "The Fast Runner." Those interested in cultural studies will especially like this as it practices constructionism. The work emphasizes that changing times create changing images. For example, as the counter-culturalists of the 1960s and 1970s embraced Native American cultures and activism, then Natives in film became "groovy."

I learned a lot here. It turns out that wearing headbands is more a Hollywood invention than a true Indian cultural practice. (Then again, Scandinavians didn't wear hats with horns, that was an operatic invention.) Most importantly, this work exposed me to the life and death of Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance. He seemed like a Black counterpart to Grey Owl and I'm going to dedicate myself to learning more about him.

I did have some concerns, however. There is a lot of focus on watching the Native director go through a journey. While I understand that it may be important to illustrate that this was a Native-made documentary, I think they could have said more about the films themselves if there had been an unseen narrator. The work concludes by saying "The Fast Runner" may be the pinnacle and future of Natives in film. However, that film was about Alaska Natives, a group that never gets mentioned before that point. (For more on them, please see the book "Freeze Frame.") Thus, the work blurs "Native American" and "indigenous" by the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Carlisle Wheeling on January 24, 2012
Format: DVD
I just finished watching this bio on the history of the Native American in movies, and have to say that my eyes were opened up to a lot of stereotypes that I'd held myself regarding they way they've been portrayed in the history of filmdom. From the beginning with silent films to the savage and inaccurate portrayals depicted in westerns up until about the 60s, then to the more adept features in the last 25 years, this is a truly well-done feature for anybody interested in the truth. Featuring activist Russell Means and actors Graham Greene, Adam Beach, and Wes Studi, it is an interesting and fascinating account of a group of people who are really more like us than Hollywood would have you believe. I am just a bit curious about Beach's comments since he was in questionable films like Squanto and Now and Forever, but then again, he was in great movies like Dance Me Outside and Windtalkers. I agree with the assessment of the films throughout the 30s to the early 60s, but how they missed the obviously worst portrayal of "injuns" I've ever seen in the Robert Mitchum and Marilyn Monroe vehicle River of No Return is astounding. They were a stereotypical mixture of the worst sort I've ever seen!

Immensely enjoyable is the story of the classic "crying Indian" from the old Saturday morning programming of my childhood who was actually Italian, but adopted the native ways through and through. I also appreciated the fact that Little Big Man was acknowledged as a groundbreaking film that was more truthful to the Cheyenne. If you want the lowdown on which era of movies to watch that portray them in the best light and the worst, check this bio out. Your eyes will be opened wide, and you will come to appreciate the contributions they have made to our society. Not to be missed!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brave Woman on May 28, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
However, we refer to our Native and Indigenous peoples, we are still out there. AND we are still being missed used, abused and attempts are still being made to discredit us and shame us. This documentary shows how all the movies that have been shown on TV and movies are portraying the wrong image. Only up till recent years have Native people been directors and have attempted to put a better light on what is really going on with the Native populations and how genocide has affected all, people and shaped their ideas of what Natives are. Too much misinformation, we need to show this movie to our young and all adults as well. Give it a shot if you want to really, REALLY know the truth. That is if you dare.
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