Buy New
$9.00
Qty:1
  • List Price: $10.00
  • Save: $1.00 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Reflections in a Golden Eye Paperback – September 8, 2000


See all 50 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.00
$4.72 $2.91
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$1.00


Frequently Bought Together

Reflections in a Golden Eye + The Member of the Wedding
Price for both: $16.16

Buy the selected items together
  • The Member of the Wedding $7.16

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 182 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; 1 edition (September 8, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618084754
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618084753
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #258,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“The greatest prose writer that the South produced” -- Tennessee Williams

“Again [McCullers] shows a sort of subterranean and ageless instinct for probing the hidden in men’s hearts and minds.”

The New York Herald-Tribune

"The novel is a masterpiece . . . as mature and finished as Henry James's THE TURN OF THE SCREW." Time Magazine

About the Author

Carson McCullers (1917-1967) was the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, The Member of the Wedding, Reflections in a Golden Eye, and Clock Without Hands. Born in Columbus, Georgia, on February 19, 1917, she became a promising pianist and enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in New York when she was seventeen, but lacking money for tuition, she never attended classes. Instead she studied writing at Columbia University, which ultimately led to The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, the novel that made her an overnight literary sensation. On September 29, 1967, at age fifty, she died in Nyack, New York, where she is buried.

More About the Author

Carson McCullers (1917-1967) was the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, The Member of the Wedding, Reflections in a Golden Eye, and Clock Without Hands. Born in Columbus, Georgia, on February 19, 1917, she became a promising pianist and enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in New York when she was seventeen, but lacking money for tuition, she never attended classes. Instead she studied writing at Columbia University, which ultimately led to The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, the novel that made her an overnight literary sensation. On September 29, 1967, at age fifty, she died in Nyack, New York, where she is buried.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
13
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 28 customer reviews
It deals with very interesting and complex characters.
Michael A. Newman
That alone was enough to make me read it, and I was suprised as to how tastfully it was done.
Daniel Vullo
Ms. McCullers keeps this story first class with her spare, though poetic language.
H. F. Corbin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Larry L. Looney on February 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The edition of this novel that I own is the one with the introduction written by Tennessee Williams - and that introduction makes a lot of valid points about the novel itself, the darkness that it contains (or attempts to contain - this depth of darkness burns through boundaries), and the reception it received upon its original publication. On this last topic, it should be noted that the novel (her second) was not nearly as well received as McCullers' debut masterpiece, THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER. Williams points out - and rightly so - that `...in her second novel the veil of a subjective tenderness...was drawn away.' What readers and critics were left with was a chilling - and compelling - portrait of six people wrecking together at a fog-shrouded emotional intersection in their lives. It's not a pretty sight - but McCullers' incredible writing simply will not allow us (or her characters) to turn away. The characters slam together completely out of emotional control - mainly because none of them really know themselves deeply enough to understand what they're feeling or experiencing. It's excruciating - and fascinating - to watch.
The book may not have been well received critically when it was new - but time has shown McCullers' talents to be long lasting. She is truly one of the giants of 20th century literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Anonymous on April 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
This novella is a brave, bald exploration of homosexuality and infidelity in the military. It presents itself as a rare event that disturbs the routine dullness of peacetime military life.

The small circle of characters is individually and collectively self-destructive. There's Captain Penderton, who comes to nurse ambivalent homosexual yearnings for Private Williams, who fancies his wife. Meanwhile, Mrs Leonora Pederton is sleeping with General Langdon, whose wife, Alison, eventually succumbs to a complete breakdown of sanity. Got that? Good. It's compulsive stuff.

In this narrow social circle, author McCullers sets "normal" domestic events such as cooking delicious Southern dinners, and card evenings, against sexual episodes (both overt and latent). These range from Private Williams crouching in Mrs Penderton's room all night long to observe her sleeping naked, through to the tormentedly homosexual Captain Pemberton wrecking the body and spirit of his wife's horse on a particularly brutal ride.

In some ways, the strangest character is the Langdons' Filipino houseboy, Anacleto. Effete, devoted and fastidious to a "T", a would-be dancer and artist, he provides tragic Mrs Langdon with a kind of love. And it is Anacleto's artistic vision of a peacock with grotesque reflections in its golden eye that explains the title.

Typically of McCullers's Southern Gothicism, the writing infuses poetry with a feeling of utter menace. At times it's scarily bald, yet lyrical: "In the sky there was a white brilliant moon and the night was cold and silvery."

Some have found it too short, but I don't see that as a problem. It's a quick, chillingly stylish read that plumbs hidden psychological depths and doesn't shrink from uncomfortable truths.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By H. F. Corbin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Written in 1941, Carson McCullers' second novel probably qualifies as a novella or long short story. Surely it was light years ahead of its time as Ms. McCullers takes on homosexuality-- latent and the other kind, masochism, adultery, voyeurism, self-mutilation, a nervous breakdown and animal cruelty in fewer than a hundred pages. In the hands of a lesser writer, this tale would have degenerated into a trashy detective story. Ms. McCullers, however, manages to make the characters, with all their warts, believable, and for the most part, sympathetic. Captain Penderton, for example, is tormented by his hidden feelings for other men-- he is simultaneously attracted to both Private Williams as well as Major Langdon and hates Williams, even though he ought to despise the Major since he is cuckolding the Captain who, along with everyone else, knows about it. But Penderton is a real person, unhappy, lonely but capable of murder.

Ms. McCullers keeps this story first class with her spare, though poetic language. "An army post [the story is set on a military post in the 1930's in the South] in peacetime is a dull place. Things happen, but then they happen over and over again. . . At the same time things do occasionally happen on an army post that are not likely to re-occur. There is a fort in the South where a few years ago a murder was committed. The participants of this tragedy were: two officers, a soldier, two women, a Filipino, and a horse." With those opening lines, the story begins and never slows down.

I never had an English professor who would give Carson McCullers the time of day. Her novels were too gothic, her plots unbelievable, there were too many kinks in her characters.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By The Wingchair Critic on June 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
Carson McCullers' often critically overlooked excellent second novel, 'Reflections In A Golden Eye' (1941), represents the author at the height of her creative powers. At the time of its release, Anais Nin thought the book betrayed the influence of D. H. Lawrence, but a more likely inspiration was fellow Southerner Erskine Caldwell, whose early novels 'Tobacco Road' (1932) and 'God's Little Acre' (1933) shared McCullers' tart black humor. Like Caldwell, McCullers parted the heavy curtains of social respectability and looked human nature unsentimentally in the face: 'Reflections In A Golden Eye' examines infidelity, madness, sexual frustration, emotional insensitivity, erotic obsession, the failure of self actualization, voyeurism, homosexuality, and bisexuality with perfect calm and assurance.

As the first paragraph bluntly reveals, 'Reflections In A Golden Eye' is a tragedy involving "two officers, a soldier, two women, a Filipino, and a horse." The novel takes place on a microcosmic army base in the Deep South: and "an army post in peacetime is a dull place." Despite the insulation of the setting and the generally grotesque inner lives of the cast, the smoothly critical tone of the book suggests that McCullers' characters are largely everymen, and thus essentially no different in any specific manner from the average American man or woman.

The novel's predominant theme is the lack of self-awareness which, in the author's vision, most members of society, at all levels, enjoy or suffer. The book begs the question, "Which is the greater burden, consciousness or unconsciousness?" McCuller's answer is clear: for most people, the burden of consciousness is by far the heavier cross to bear.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search