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The Regent's Daughter Hardcover – June 12, 1989


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--This text refers to the Unknown Binding edition.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 2 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; 1st American ed edition (June 12, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 039913428X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399134289
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.7 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,700,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Jean Plaidy, by the skilful blending of superb storytelling and meticulous attention to authenticity of detail and depth of characterisation has become one of the country's most widely read novelists. " Sunday Times "Full-blooded, dramatic, exciting." Observer "Plaidy excels at blending history with romance and drama." New York Times "Outstanding" Vanity Fair --This text refers to the Unknown Binding edition.

About the Author

Jean Plaidy, one of the preeminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century, is the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, also known as Victoria Holt. Jean Plaidy's novels had sold more than 14 million copies worldwide by the time of her death in 1993. --This text refers to the Unknown Binding edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Gloria E. Salavarria (skaggs@michiana.org) on December 23, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The tragic story of Princess Charlotte, only child of George IV and Caroline of Brunswick, is more than just history, it's a tale not uncommon to today's children of divorce. Even though her parents never divorced, Princess Charlotte was a true child of divorce. She was caught between two adults who loathed each other.
Her mother, always given to excessive familiarities and eccentricities, was starved for love and lavished it in excess on her daughter. For all this, Caroline was unable to truly give her daughter what she needed, when she needed it.
Although Charlotte inherited her father's looks, she reminded him too much of her mother. As a result, George IV kept her at a distance, yet he played her for a pawn and denied her the comfort and companionship of her mother.
Even her grandmother, Queen Charlotte, and her spinster aunts looked upon her with critical eyes, finding fault in any behavior that reminded them of her mother. It's no surprise that Princess Charlotte developed a nervous stutter and lived down to their expectations that she'd be a graceless reminder of her mother. In the British royal family, one can see all social pathologies and human foibles writ large.
Charlotte found happiness in the end but died giving birth to a stillborn child. Her death set the stage for another princess, one who would become Queen Victoria. Once more, Jean Plaidy makes history easy to read and clear to the casual reader.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Susan Higginbotham on October 7, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Regent's Daughter is a novel about Charlotte, daughter of George IV and his estranged wife, Caroline. Charlotte died when she was only twenty-one, following the birth of a stillborn boy. Because of that, this novel is a bit different from Plaidy's other historical novels in that most of it takes place during Charlotte's childhood and teenage years. In following her growth from a rebellious child to a happily married woman, the novel has almost a bildungsroman feel about it, except that the unfortunate Charlotte dies just as she reaches maturity, physically and emotionally.

Unlike some of the other novels in the Georgian series, most of the events are seen from Charlotte's point of view, though there's an occasional switch to the Prince Regent's point of view and that of a few other characters. This concentration on Charlotte helps add depth to the book that tends to be lacking in some of the other books in the series, which flit from character to character and sometimes read like narrative histories with a little dialogue thrown in now and then.

I thought Plaidy did a good job in particular of showing Charlotte's troubled relationships with her parents, who as portrayed here are different in many ways but alike in being self-centered and self-dramatizing. It was also a nice touch for Plaidy to show Charlotte's grandmother and namesake, Queen Charlotte, softening toward her granddaughter later in the book, although I would have liked to have seen the relationship between the two women explored in more depth.

Plaidy has her usual tendency to repeat herself, though I didn't find it as annoying here as I have in some of her other novels. All in all, I'd say this isn't one of her best novels, but it's certainly one of her better ones.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brittany on September 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is one of my favorite Jean Plaidy books (along with all of her pen names), which is saying a lot since she has written hundereds! This book tells the story of the result of the ill-fated marriage between George IV, then Prince of Wales, and Caroline of Brunswick. Charlotte, their only child, lived a sad life always trying to win love from those she loved.
Plaidy writes this story perfectly with impressive attention to historical detail. If anyone is interested in starting to read Plaidy's work, this is a wonderful place to start (but where is is not?!).
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By Alex on March 16, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've heard of Princess Charlotte only in passing in books about Queen Victoria. It was mentioned that she was born because her cousin, Charlotte died. So who was Princess Charlotte?

The only child of the never should have been married couple, Prince George and Princess Caroline of Wales, she was supposed to become Queen of England, but for her tragic death. Her life is really no less tragic. She's ignored by her father unless she serves some political purpose because she's simply her mother's daughter. She is therefore uncouth and a spot in his eyes. No matter how much she tries to please him she cannot. And in retaliation she bothers to stop trying most of the time. Then her mother is kept away from her and showers her with affection, but it's not what she wants. She's a poster child for the only and lonely. Her only friends are those in her household.

You feel sorry for her through this whole mess. Her parents hate each other, and their and her, only saving grace is that they don't have to live under the same roof. Much to the chagrin of her grandfather she soon to be senile King George III. She dislikes most of her family, and is terrified of her grandmother. Hard place to grow up.

I felt like Plaidy did the tale justice, I did get to know Charlotte rather well. Being an only child myself, and having an only child, I understood many of her dilemmas and feelings. But I felt like much of the book was repeat. I felt like it should have been shorter in many areas. That's really Plaidy's only down fall is that she does repeat herself quite a bit and that can drag a story out.

However, if you're reading these it's a book you cannot miss. It's very important in setting up the last two books, which I'm getting to now. Her death is the very reason for Queen Victoria's birth. And this isn't a bad thing, though tragic.
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