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Regicide Mass Market Paperback – August 30, 2011


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Solaris; Original edition (August 30, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907992006
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907992001
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 4.2 x 6.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,277,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Menacing and uncanny - The Guardian on 'Mortality' Immaculately sinister - TLS on 'Mortality' A thoroughly satisfying, thought-provoking and beautifully realized work that will keep you pondering for days and will seep into your dreams - Infinity Plus on 'Antwerp' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

The winner of two British Fantasy Awards, Nicholas Royle is the author of a short story collection, Mortality, two novellas – The Appetite and The Enigma of Departure – and five novels, including Counterparts, The Director’s Cut and Antwerp. He teaches creative writing at Manchester Metropolitan University and reviews fiction for the Independent. He runs Nightjar Press, which specialises in publishing original short stories as signed, limited-edition chapbooks. He has also edited numerous short story anthologies.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Bâki on September 4, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In recent literary times a lot has been made of the concept of weird in fiction, and various writers old and new have been said to write under this banner or of its stillborn offspring, the New Weird. For a whole host of reasons, I've never much cared for this concept, even though I like and appreciate the work of a number of writers labelled weird. Nicholas Royle is not weird - in the literary sense. He may be the freakiest dude you'll ever meet in reality, I've no idea - and is not generally considered such, as far as I'm aware. So why mention it? Well, because I think in some ways his writing represents another loosely aligned stream of fiction that plays with abstraction and the otherworldy, but which has not received the same degree of attention, that of the uncanny. A style that owes much to psychoanalysis and the writings of Sigmund Freud, and which can be seen in the works of authors like Roald Dahl and Christopher Priest, and in the films of Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch among others.

In Regicide, the motifs of the uncanny are present from the outset. From the moment that Carl (the narrator) breaks into a strange empty house to answer a constantly ringing telephone - only to find the person at the end of the line seemingly knows his name - the reader's perception of normality is eroded. The ringing phone re-occurs as a theme, along with puzzles and maps, records playing silent messages and dogs - violent, dangerous dogs. All of these have symbolic associations, that reveal the inner workings of Carl's mind. As the narrative progresses it becomes increasingly difficult to tell what has actually happened in this reality, and what has occurred in another place, that may or may not just be an aspect of Carl's psyche.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Teresa Pietersen VINE VOICE on March 4, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It is very hard to pin down or pigeon hole this book, so I won't try.
If you like the weird, surreal or strange tale then this is one is for you.
Our hero is Carl who meets and falls for Annie.
On their first date they wind up lost in a maze of London's side streets.
Later on in one of these streets Carl breaks into a house to answer a ringing phone and the call is for him.
Are you curious yet? Because that's possibly the most "normal" part of the story, from here on it gets decidedly surreal.
There are unreadable maps, vinyl records that play nothing or so you are led to believe and people out to get Carl.
It is part urban fantasy and part psychological thrill ride. Not bad for a small novel - it's only 238 pages.
Gave 4 stars because I'd guessed the ending, but it was still a good read and an original story.
Readers of Tim Powell or Clive Barker will get a kick out of this.
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