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Religion and the Racist Right: The Origins of the Christian Identity Movement Paperback – December 15, 1996


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Religion and the Racist Right: The Origins of the Christian Identity Movement + American Extremists + Terror in the Mind of God: The Global Rise of Religious Violence, 3rd Edition (Comparative Studies in Religion and Society, Vol. 13)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; revised edition (December 15, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807846384
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807846384
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #706,339 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

While the Christian Identity cult is numerically insignificant, its ideology informs and influences American racist powers of every stripe. Identity's bizarre conceptual stew stirs together peculiar interpretations of biblical scripture to "prove" inherent Caucasian superiority. Its literal demonization of Jews fuels not only white racist groups such as WAR but also Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam. Barkun (political science, Syracuse Univ.) here proffers the first sustained study of Identity from its origins in 19th-century British-Israelism, which held that the Anglo-Saxons were the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. While James Aho's fine Politics of Righteousness (Univ. of Washington Pr., 1990) addresses Identity's political activity, this work remains the only complete analysis of its more pervasive religious teachings. Essential to every academic collection concerned with racism, anti-Semitism, and American religious cults.
Bill Piekarski, Southwestern Coll. Lib., Chula Vista, Cal.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

A fascinating and terrifying account that is at once a work of academic scholarship and a startling expos‚ of a particularly virulent form of religious extremism. Barkun (Political Science/Syracuse Univ.) examines the origins and ideology of the so-called Christian Identity Movement. This small movement (upper-range estimates figure its adherents at no more than 50,000 and lower guesses say they number only 2,000) has nevertheless succeeded in dominating the discourse of the extreme right--even among groups not even distantly related to it. White supremacist and anti-Semitic, the Christian Identity Movement (composed of groups like the Aryan Nation, the Posse Comitatus, and David Duke's element of the Ku Klux Klan, among others) has three core beliefs--whites are the true descendants of the biblical Israelites and as such have a providential role to fulfill; Jews are unrelated to the biblical Israelites and are instead the spawn of Satan; and the world is on the verge of a fiery apocalypse in which the Aryans must battle the Jews and their allies to redeem the world. In this last regard, the Israel of the traditional apocalyptic accounts becomes identified with the United States rather than the ancient land of Palestine. Barkun convincingly demonstrates the direct roots of these Christian Identity groups in an obscure school of 19th-century thought in England known as British-Israelism. This philosophy saw Britons as the descendants of the ten lost tribes of Israel, and thus linked to the Jews, with a role as a chosen people. Unlike its violent American progeny, however, the previous movement was not anti-Semitic and, in fact, recognized a kinship with Jews. Compelling and well presented, this volume deserves to be read by anyone concerned with Christian or political extremism in America. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 23 people found the following review helpful By B. Jackson on February 22, 2001
Format: Hardcover
While I highly enjoyed this book and found it meticulously, yet engagingly, researched, I will try to refrain from repeating what other reviewers have already stated. What I would like to add, is that I was unexpectedly impressed with the tortuous connections Barkun unearthed between the Identity/British-Israel sects/movements and other strains of Protestants and Pentecostals. I felt that I learned not only about Identity, but also gained a wider perspective on America's colorful religious history. Barkun also did an admirable job of maintaining a degree of objectivity and emotional distance from his subject, preventing a preachy or moralistic tone from overwhelming the book.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on September 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
Professor Barkun has certainly done his research in this exhaustive project on the linkage between Anglo-Israelism and Christian Identity. I found the sections on the demonization of the Jews the most relevent explanation of Identity doctrine I've ever seen. By looking at early Identity founders such as William Potter Gale and Wesley Swift, Professor Barkun does a great job of showing how Identity has morphed into its present form. He did his research, which is heavily footnoted. The only problem I have with this book is his tendency to overstate the obvious-again and again. Overall, a must read for anyone interested in the religious ultraright.
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10 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 1997
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Religion and the Racist Right" traces the origins and
development of the Christian Identity movement, a particularly
virulent strain of racist theology that constitutes the
religious undergirding of many violence prone white supremacists
groups on the radical right of our political culture. These are
groups like the Ku Klux Klan, the Aryan Nations, the Order, the
Posse Comitatus, and the Militias. The author, Michael Barkun,
also argues that Identity doctrine is conspicuous within the
circles of David Duke supporters.

Mr. Barkun finds the origin of Identity within a distant and
little known 19th century religious movement called British
Israelism. This movement emerged from within Victorian English
Protestant circles and claimed that the British were descendants
of the "lost ten tribes" of Israel. Barkun then asks, and sets
about to answer the question as to how this rather curious
notion devolved into the three central religious doctrines of
Christian Identity; first and most important, that the Jews are
the literal biological offspring of Satan who have from the
beginning of time been engaged in a cosmic conspiracy to rob the
white race of its birthright as the true "chosen people of God";
that the white "Aryans" are descendants of the biblical tribes
of Israel; and that the world is on the verge of a final,
apocalyptic struggle between good and evil, in which Aryans do
battle with the Jewish conspiracy and its allies so that the
world can be redeemed.

The question is important because, as Mr.
Read more ›
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 21, 1997
Format: Paperback
This is really the only complete history of the Christian Identity movement, a modern descendent of the anglo-centric British Israelism movement of the late 19th century.

Identity is the overtly racist religion practiced by Aryan Nations, the Freemen, and many other fringe White Supremacist movements. Among the beliefs subscribed to by a variety of Identity groups are that Jews are descendents of Satan, and that all non-Whites are descendents of sub-human "beasts of the field" created before Adam and Eve. Identity believers claim that they are the "remnant" of the lost tribes of Israel, and will have dominion over the earth after a racist holy war in which God will smite all their enemies. This is a fascinating book that sheds light on an
obscure and shadowy movement that has united many disparate elements of the racist fringe for the past couple of decades. I could't put it down! While Identity has been covered in passing in other books or articles, nobody has researched and explained this movement quite like Barkun, a professor of Political Science at Syracuse. Tad Cook
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Troy Waller (carmaust@iname.com) on October 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
Whilst Barkun's book is primarily about Christian Identity groups, they share a common heritage with British-Israelist groups. Barkun traced this common history in some detail. My primary interest in this book was the British-Israel aspect and I found Barkun's book to be the best modern source on this subject even though it was not the main focus of his text.
Barkun's research was excellent and his references listed gave me ample reading once I had finished the book. His listing of references is enough to warrant purchasing the book.
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9 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ricky Hunter on August 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a thorough and fascinating (in a skin-crawly kind of way) look at the origins of Christian Identity, tracing it back to its British-Israelism roots in the nineteenth century. The author narrowly focuses on the theological elements in this discussion for most of the book and the how or why which made people believe these quite paranoid, delusional or hate-filled things is left out of the discussion. This book is about what they believed and not why. But that really would not fit into this book (and would take several on its own account). This book also does not go beyond British Isrealism or the Christian Identity into other ways in which the right, religion and rascism all connect. But what this book does cover, it does so masterfully and the research is impressive and important. An read for anyone interested in the right wing fringes of society in a "know thy enemy" sort of way.
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