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Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Torchbooks) Paperback – August 5, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0061300677 ISBN-10: 0061300675

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Product Details

  • Series: Torchbooks
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne (August 5, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061300675
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061300677
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #602,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was born in Königsberg, Prussia, where he remained his entire life. His others works include Critique of Pure Reason and Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone.

Customer Reviews

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This book was written in 1793 when Kant was in his 70s.
Steven H Propp
Nonetheless, despite these problems I enjoyed this book, I recommend it to anyone who is curios enough to read it.
Philonous
That caveat in place, Kant's book a fine attempt at grounding religious belief in something other than revelation.
E. M. Dale

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By E. M. Dale on July 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
Let me state up front that I do not think Kant succeeded in what he tried to do in this book. That caveat in place, Kant's book a fine attempt at grounding religious belief in something other than revelation. Now, of course that might ruffle a few feathers on both sides of the belief-fence (as it did in his day, and will continue to do), but that was Kant's goal in this text. However, no understanding of Kant's reasoning in this book (or any other of his works) can be complete without taking into account the Lutheran Pietism in which he was raised. (Regarding the review below, Kant was never Roman Catholic; the Lutheran streak is part of what made Kant who he was, for good or ill.) The subjectivism of his Pietist background had an almost incalculable affect on Kant's philosophy and metaphysics. As a matter of fact, the subjectivist principle of his "Copernican revolution" in philosophy could arguably be seen as a natural outgrowth of the personalism that his Lutheran Pietist upbringing gave to him. Members of the Pietist sects current in Kant's day believed that religion should be realized, contained, and held deep within the inner self. They also held that religion should be expressed through simplicity and obedience to moral law. Hence, to oversimplify, we get Kant's famous "starry heavens above and the moral law within" as the two things which fill him "with ever increasing wonder."

Kant was convinced that the moral basis of religion, specifically the Christian religion, was available to any and all by introspection and meditation. In this work, he sets out to show why that is the case and how it could be achieved.
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Format: Paperback
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who is perhaps the founder of "modern" philosophy, with his focus on epistemology (theory of knowledge); he wrote many books, such as Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Practical Reason, Critique of Judgement, Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics, etc.

This book was written in 1793 when Kant was in his 70s. He notes, "However the origin of moral evil in man is constituted, surely of all the explanations of the spread and propaganda of this evil through all the members and generations of our race, the most inept is that which describes it as descending to us as an inheritance from our first parents; for one can say of moral evil precisely what the poet [Ovid] said of good: [`Race and ancestors, and those things which we ourselves have not made, I scarcely account our own']." (Pg. 35) He asks, "if a man is corrupt in the very ground of his maxims, how can he possibly bring about this revolution by his own powers and of himself become a good man? Yet duty bids us to do this, and duty demands nothing of us which we cannot do. There is no reconciliation possible here except by saying that man is under the necessity of, and is therefore capable of, a revolution in his cast of mind, but only of a gradual reform in his sensuous nature." (Bk. One, General Observation, pg.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Philonous on January 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
Those who are perplexed by this book, should read "In defense of Kant's religion",would feel some-what eased by it. Anyways, to continue my review, I wanted to say is that I really enjoyed this book despite the fact that I may not necessarily agree with Kant. What made Kant very peculiar to me is his "rational pluralism" as opposed to "naive pluralism" exemplified by the new age movement. By this Kant meant that every religion has seeds of truths or moral principles that are universal among them, and as long as this is the case, then it becomes a basis for religions to get along with each other. Another interesting aspect of Kant's philosophy of religion is that he makes a distinction between the "empirical" and the "transcendental" interpretation of the scripture. Kant believes that whether or not there is evidence for the accounts of the bible is no matter, because what matters is the transcendental aspect of the accounts, which goes beyond the empirical accounts. Conservative theists make take issue with this, but I think that this argument is consistent with his whole systematic philosophy when he made a distinction between the noumenal and the phenomenal. Kant's understanding of Christ as the Platonic Archetype of the Good Person which resides in God for eternity is another fascinating aspect of it. It is through this Archetype that people acquire something that gives them the power to do good. I just feel that Kant's philosophy of religion is enriched with ideas, but at the same time Kant did not attempt to make his philosophy of religion very appealing, and I don't think he tried.Read more ›
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More About the Author

Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was one of the most influential philosophers of all time. His comprehensive and profound thinking on aesthetics, ethics, and knowledge has had an immense impact on all subsequent philosophy.

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Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Torchbooks)
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