Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $2.49 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Religious Body Paperback – November 1, 2007


See all 25 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.46
$8.37 $1.92
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Frequently Bought Together

The Religious Body + A Most Contagious Game (Rue Morgue Classic British Mysteries) + The Stately Home Murder (Rue Morgue Classic British Mysteries)
Price for all three: $37.38

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 158 pages
  • Publisher: Rue Morgue (November 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1601870124
  • ISBN-13: 978-1601870124
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,110,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From AudioFile

Robin Bailey is not a showy narrator. With his British accent and low-key approach, he matches the author's understatement and wry wit. In this first book of 18 in the mystery series, a slightly world-weary Inspector Sloan investigates the murder of Sister Anne, a nun found dead at the bottom of the convent cellar stairs. He must do so under the watchful eye of his pompous superintendent and with the sometimes dubious help of a young constable. Robin Bailey captures the essence of Inspector Sloan exactly. Fortunately for us, Bailey narrated several more of the Sloan series before he died in 1999. P.G. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Woodbury on July 11, 2002
Format: Audio Cassette
Robin Bailey is laconic. I generally prefer quicker--or perhaps I should say, lighter--readers (Ian Carmichael, Rosemary Leach) but there is something hypnotically pleasant about listening to Robin Bailey's deep voice. You can picture him raising his eyebrows over some of Sloan's dialog.
In typical Aird fashion, the dialog is often quite cryptic and the mystery is somewhat thin. If you like mysteries for the clues, the red herrings, the complex puzzle building, Aird is not for you. If, however, you enjoy irony and the fine sketches of various personalities (in the context, of course, of a murder), Aird is a good choice.
Recommendation: I'm a firm believer that readers make all the difference in the enjoyment of an audiotape. If you've never heard Robin Bailey before, check one of his audios out of the library first.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Michele L. Worley on January 2, 2006
Format: Audio Cassette
As is usual in Sloan's cases, THE RELIGIOUS BODY begins not with any member of the police team, but on what at first looks to be a typical day in the lives of those who are about to discover the first body - in this case, with Sister Mary St. Gertrude, who this month is Caller for the Convent of St. Anselm. Sister Gertrude begins her official day by waking the Reverend Mother, then working her way through the rest of the sisters in their prescribed order, making no especial note of the day or season apart from hoping that the weather will be fine this Bonfire Night so that the fireworks won't be going off at odd hours, and vaguely remembering last year's hijinks by the students of the neighbouring agricultural college. Everything seems more or less routine, even discovering that Sister Anne isn't in her cell (Sister Anne's test of true Christian charity being that she sleeps next door to the convent's champion snorer).

But when Sister Anne is absent from breakfast, and nervous little Sister Peter the chantress finds that she's got blood on her hands from brushing against something she doesn't remember, that's another matter - and when Sister Anne is found at the bottom of the cellar steps with a broken skull, Inspector Sloan and Constable Crosby are called in.

As is often the case with Aird's books, the police pathologist, Doctor Dabbe, is very much a personality quite apart from having a key role to play (Aird's own father was a doctor, incidentally); Sister Anne not only didn't die from a fall, but couldn't have been alive much past supper the previous evening - despite testimony from other sisters that she'd attended Compline afterward. One of the sub-plots of the case is the hunt for the murder weapon - my compliments to you if you identify it before the police do.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Miss Ivonne on September 4, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
You would think a 1966 novel on murder committed at a Roman Catholic convent in the English countryside would be dated. Not so! You'll find the mystery of the murder of Sister Anne to be cleverly plotted -- as is the novel. You'll grow to love Detective Inspector Sloan, despite his impatience and gruff exterior, and sympathize with the dim-witted but long-suffering Sergeant Crosby.

I never guessed who the murderer was. I also loved the detail of life in a pre-Vatican II convent, which was much less austere than I would have expected. I highly recommend The Religious Body, and I promise you won't be able to wait to the read the other books in this series from the prolific Catherine Aird.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bo Brown on July 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This novel introduced Detective Inspector Sloan. Really excellently plotted with a clever denouement, all the characters have depth and quirkiness (with the possible exception of the denizens of the boys' school next door, who seem rather stereotypical). The interaction of cloistered nuns and flat-foot coppers makes for a nice stirry-pot of entertainment. Since they are dealing with a religious community, which probably move more slowly than the rest of the world, none of the references seem dated. It's just good old-fashioned human tragedy, served up cozy and warm.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By JJares on November 13, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Catherine Aird is one of my favorite authors; I love British literature. I read Aird, not for her police procedures but for her droll sense of humor. I particularly love the way Sloan is put upon by the Inspector assigning young Crosby to "assist."

Crosby couldn't assist a blind person across the street, so it is always fun to see what excuse is given for sending the young constable. Usually, it is something like, "There's no one else; you'll just have to take Crosby."

Crosby's mutterings under his breath are usually priceless; he and Dr. Dabbe (the police pathologist) offer some comedy to the proceedings. I often wonder what Crosby's thoughts are about being considered the most useless member of the Berebury CID.

As I reread Aird's works, I am always impressed how her stories stand up to the passage of time. Although this work was written in the late 1960's, the style speaks of an even earlier time in history; it seems to be a "period piece."

In this first novel, Aird sets about establishing the characters in Berebury CID; and characters they all are! From "Happy Harry" (who isn't) to Sloan to Dr. Dabbe, everyone brings something to the banquet.

THE RELIGIOUS BODY is not Aird's best work (there aren't enough hints for the reader to guess the murderer), but it is a pleasant introduction to Aird's wry wit and entertaining characters!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?