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Remembrance Days Import

16 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, September 4, 1997
$32.34 $8.73

Editorial Reviews

The English pop-rock trio's sophomore outing, first released in 1987. 11 tracks, including 'Indian Summer' and 'Power To Believe'. Warner.


1. Indian Summer
2. The Lesson Of Love
3. Humdrum
4. Power To Believe
5. Hampstead Girl
6. Here
7. In The Hands Of Love
8. Ballad In 4/4
9. Doubleminded
10. Everybody's Gotta Learn Sometime
11. In Exile

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 4, 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Wea International
  • ASIN: B000005S5O
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #444,013 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on February 2, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The trick to topping or maintaining a debut album featuring a sound unlike the danceable New Romantic/Second British Invasion sound of Duran Duran or Spandau Ballet is a hard and rocky ground, especially with a single like "Life In A Northern Town." Well, the Dream Academy's second term, titled Remembrance Days, has them maintaining that same sound, Nick Laird-Clowes's gentle vocals and guitars as well as co-producing work, Kate St. John's oboe and cor anglais, and Gilbert Gabriel's keyboards.
The reflection of a summer spent at a rented house on the shore that one really enjoyed staying at drives the dreamy "Indian Summer" which gets backing vocal support from J.D. Souther and Lindsey Buckingham, the latter who co-produced this song. There's a basso Indian-sounded chant mid-song, lending to the atmosphere.
"The Lessons Of Love" benefits from a lilting guitar and an overall gentle feel and backing choir. When Laird-Clowes sings against leaving the city of love and moving to the valley of reason, I see a true romantic at work there who believes anybody, rich or poor, even a self-made liar, can learn the lesson. This song was produced by Patrick Leonard.
"Humdrum" is another portrait of the industrial city, of the workers whose labours benefit the higher-ups, who live in a world of deadlines and are wound up so tight in this dog-eat-dog situation.
The soft percussion and the haunting aura of "Power To Believe" reminds me of Phil Collins' "In The Air Tonight" telling the story of a privilege-born man who turns his back on that to find a deeper truth, and the hard trials he undergoes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Whenever I listen to this album, or any other material from TDA, I think about the good old times as a student in the late 80s, early 90s. Beautiful melodies, melancholic at times, and always brilliantly mastered. In a way, I'm glad not too many people know of this little gem.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Karlberg on February 19, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a great Dream Academy album, and with every listen I'm able to appreciate more of it. I'm not here to review it though. I wanted to let any serious fans of the Dream Academy know about two other projects that might be of interest. The first is "The Invisible Circus" film soundtrack--still available used here at Amazon. This was released around 2000, and the instrumental score (about 7-10 tracks) was composed by Nick Laird-Clowes. A few other Laird-Clowes originals are included under the guise of his recent band, Trashmonk. While the instrumental score tracks are fondly reminescent of the Dream Academy's folkish melodies, the Trashmonk songs are decidedly less relaxed (and didn't appeal much to me personally).
The other CD I wanted to note here is by a producer/DJ who goes by the name of Dario G. His CD, "Sunmachine," which is also available here at Amazon, is best described as pre-millennium electric anthems. It sounds a little like the music from Chicane's "Behind the Sun," only less trance-inflected. At any rate, the first track on "Sunmachine," is Sunchyme. This is only relevant on account of the song's base melody which derives heavily from Dream Academy's Life in a Northern Town, right down to the genuine inclusion of the chorus "Hey-oh-ma-ma-ma's." The original DA song isn't sampled quite enough for this to be a remix, but at the same time, Sunchyme contains so many elements of Life in a Northern Town, that it can't really be considered an altogether separate song. Anyone who might have heard this featured on a TV commercial for contact lenses a few years ago can now exhale. I, for one, am sleeping better now that I've found its source. The rest of Dario G's CD isn't bad either...given its age.
I hope this encourages someone out there.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Tice on September 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
What a great forgotten group. A very hard to get album is finally available. This CD brings back a lot of memories. This is a "whatever happened to" group that was forgotten but this music embodies a great sense of love, lost and gained and a very memorable track from the movie Planes, Trains and Automobiles. Don't miss out on the Dream Academy, a group well ahead of its time and a very personable CD with some great songs. Be prepared to be put in a "Dream-like" state of melancholy.
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Format: Audio CD
The Dream Academy's second album, 1987's "Remembrance Days", is not as great as their absolute masterpiece debut. David Gilmour, who co-produced all but one of the tracks from the debut, doesn't participate here. Every track here is co-produced by Hugh Padgham, who worked with closely with Phil Collins and Genesis throughout the `80s. Now, I'm a tremendous fan of '80s Genesis and '80s Phil, and the idea of bringing in Padgham to produce the Dream Academy seems totally promising. The results ARE generally very strong, but, it seems that Gilmour and Nick Laird-Clowes had a major chemistry that helped give the debut its unique, arresting atmosphere. The sound overall on "Remembrance Days" leans considerably more toward a typical late `80s pop-rock sound. Plus, the songwriting is overall a noticeable step down from the previous album.

Don't get me wrong, though. There's still a lot of magic here. I wouldn't call this a sophomore slump--it's still well-worth checking out, with many tracks that rank among the Dream Academy's best ever, which is saying a lot. "The Power To Believe" is a terrifically melodic, haunting, atmospheric story-song--it does strongly recall Phil Collins' "In the Air Tonight", and in turn, it seems to have influenced Phil's subsequent "We Fly So Close" from his 1993 album "Both Sides". "Humdrum" is a mesmerizing, evocative song with incisive lyrics about the rat race people find themselves in, and it's additionally punctuated by a great saxophone solo from Kate St John.
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