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Rent Girl Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Last Gasp (August 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0867196203
  • ISBN-13: 978-0867196207
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 8 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #594,647 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Customer Reviews

As a fan of all of Michelle Tea's works, this one keeps track with her amazing writing style.
Cleo Marigold
You can't read it without taking part in its ugliness (and yes, I think this book is purposefully, consciously and conscientiously ugly).
J. B. Murphy
I agree that the book could use some proofreading, especially in the latter half, but that's a minor point.
sunjoy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Little Old Me on November 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
Michelle Tea never seems tired of writing about her life. If she keeps up to her to usual standards, there's no reason why the rest of us would ever tire of reading about it either. RENT GIRL focuses on Tea's history in the sex trade, a witty graphic novel/memoir that is not only humorous and inspiring but beautifully illustrated.

Tea is a fantastic writer who does not shy away from revealing the "mechanics" of her exploits to an encounter with a bad case of crabs. There is no "woe is me" monologues or angry tirades against an unforgiving society. She describes the absurdity of her clients, from a self-proclained warlock to cocaine-addicted business men. Her writing masterfully remains passively unapologetic and full of the witty prose that Tea is known for. The art work is spectacular. Laurenn McCubbin's eye for detail captures near-perfect facial expressions and the raw emotion of Tea's work. I hope the two will collaborate again.

RENT GIRL is simply amazing. Michelle Tea's personal accounts are simple yet complicated with jaded opinions and poetic verses about faked sex acts and looking for stability in a chaotic world. This won't disappoint.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Clint Catalyst on January 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
This graphic novel is less about a working-class lesbian's foray into the sex industry and more about the liberation of life experience. Tea reinforces the fact that she's the real deal: Her prose is colloquial and well-crafted--typos notwithstanding. And McCubbin's illustrations? Each is a little piece of perfection: shimmering, warm, and bright.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Francis on September 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
The book is written differently than any other book I have read so that caught me off guard at first. I learned to enjoy the way Michelle Tea wrote and was fasinated by her life. My only complaint is that it ended way too soon. I am going to purchase more of her work. The artwork is wonderful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cleo Marigold on August 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a fan of all of Michelle Tea's works, this one keeps track with her amazing writing style. It's not normal, but it's not unbearably weird. This book is hard to put down, and when you do put it down, you will think about it.

It goes in hard into how exactly her life was, real, gritty, and not glossed over. She doesn't just focus on the good times, she gets into the raw of it. The drawings that accompany are amazing as well.

This will go down as one of my favorite books.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By York Brun Luethje on December 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ultimately, this book leaves me cold. The premise sounds good, a lesbian hooker's kiss and tell plus pictures but after a promising beginning, describing an invite-only party her madame throws the story falters. The main reason for this is that the narrator appears to have only one attitude towards other people: sneering contempt. This doesn't say much about these other people but it says a lot about the narrator. And thus one loses interest in her rapidly.

Add atrocious (i.e. non-existent) editing, numerous spelling errors and the constant substitution of `than' with `then' and the picture that emerges is that of an author who appears to think that a memoir is worth reading simply because the author happens to be a part of the queer community. I am sorry, but it is not. Being self-absorbed and condescending doesn't make you a good writer, queer or not. I'd much rather read Dorothy Allison or Patrick Califia for that matter.

A shame, really, because the idea does sound good and the illustrations by Laurenn McGubbin are quite nice.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Litocracy on March 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
After reading "Valencia," I decided to check out Michele Tea's "Rent Girl," a collaborative graphic novel style memoir about the author's years as a prostitute in Boston and, briefly, San Francisco. I loved the style and aesthetic of this book (even though a bizarre number of the illustrations were just pictures of Tea in various outfits, facing the viewer with this "let me tell you how it is" look on her face).

The prose was stylistically similar to Tea's other work, but more focused on the topic at hand. The author spends little time discussing her own emotions, thought processes and even her own life outside work and the people she worked with. This book is interesting not because Tea offers compelling characters or a fully developed life story, but because she explains frankly and unabashedly what prostitution is like.

Overall, it was a good read, but not as absorbing as some of her other work.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Sorel VINE VOICE on May 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed the writing a great deal and was impressed that the "graphic" aspects of the novel did not override the plot and characters in the actual story. However, I was disappointed in the story as a whole. I found Tea's work as a sex worker extremely interesting, but as a narrator I found her to be whiny and often annoying. Though she courageously displayed her weaknesses as well as her strengths, I still could not help but want more from the characters whether it was development, background information, or some resolution. Being that it is a memoir, everything can't always be pleasantly resolved. However, every character eventually disappear without any acknowledgment that they had previously existed.

The story begins with great strength and interest as Tea describes her life as a lesbian sex worker in Boston. As her travels bring her to Provincetown and Tucson, the reader can feel that Tea is running out of steam (and so is her story). Her girlfriend, for the majority of the piece, is a self-centered and one-dimensional woman who introduces Tea to the world of prostitution. Along the way, the two meet up and live with various other sex workers and drug addicts. While the ride is rocky and the writing is smooth, the characters are emotionally limited and appear as caricatures.
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