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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Earth as it is in Heaven
Mike Crosby has always had a "consuming zeal for the house of the Lord." It seems to be his prophetic charism and destiny as a son of Francis to heed the call, "repair my house." In book after book, he looks at the Church he loves and the message of its Founder and asks why the two don't mirror one another more fully. In this, his latest book, he brings the discussion to...
Published on April 11, 2012 by Alice MacDonald

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Repair My House
Good Vatican II theology applied well. However, Crosby is distracting with all his self-inflating insertions to reach a point. He could have said as much more simply in fewer pages.
Sometimes obtuse and you wonder where he is going, but that's all part of his construction. On balance, a worthy read if you have time.
Published on October 21, 2012 by J. Gadoua


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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Earth as it is in Heaven, April 11, 2012
This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Mike Crosby has always had a "consuming zeal for the house of the Lord." It seems to be his prophetic charism and destiny as a son of Francis to heed the call, "repair my house." In book after book, he looks at the Church he loves and the message of its Founder and asks why the two don't mirror one another more fully. In this, his latest book, he brings the discussion to full flowering, transcending previous works while including all of them in a well researched and documented scholarly study that is at the same time accessible to the average reader. Taking full advantage of his years of experience and reflection on Institutional Catholicism he brilliantly brings the discussion into a 21st century context with which to not only understand where the crises lay, but to also look ahead to a "way" through. Institutional Catholicism is dying, unsustainable in its present structure.

The first two parts of the book lay open the present problems and explore them within Jesus' Gospel of the Reign of God. The golden thread of promise and hope for the future that he weaves through the book is the model of Trinitarian relationality, a "communion of persons in loving relationship." This model is a mutual, reciprocal, equal exchange of energy creating ever new potential and possibility. The "mystery" of the Trinity is laid bare as Crosby unveils its hiddenness as the blueprint or archetype within which the whole creative process unfolds and with which it is branded from the beginning, imprinted on its soul and containing an inherent "economy" which meets the needs of all persons in the relationship. This is the "Gospel" Jesus revealed. This is the direction of the whole creative process and the true "Kindom of Heaven on Earth." The degree to which Institutional Catholicism is able to mirror this Trinitarian model is the measure of how well it fulfills its role as the "Sacrament of Christ in the world."

The pearl of the book lies in the last section where Crosby brings the discussion in to 21st century language using the lens of "seven contemporary sacramentals" as the "way" (DAO of becoming a kindom Catholic): The Cosmic Way, The Christic Way, The Way of Consciousness, The Way of Connectedness, The Contemplative Way, and the Way of Community. Edwina Gateley says it best in her endorsement: "A provocative, honest, and thoughtful read for any Catholic committed to renewal and a more meaningful and faithful model of church for our quantum age."
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hope and sacramentals for cultural transformation, May 18, 2012
This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Hope allows us to believe that the best of who we are becoming is ahead of us. In Repair My House, Michael Crosby gives us hope for what the Catholic Church can become when it revisits the "charism" of the Trinity itself - the invitation to remember our relationship and interconnectedness to all of creation. When our institutions reflect, or in a quantum way give us a fractal image of this trinity of relationship, then they reflect the mutuality, intimacy and love of the Gospel invitation.

With the practice of what Michael Crosby calls seven contemporary "sacramentals", he gifts us with a path to an alternative story, different from the dominant current story of patriarchal hierarchy and clericalism, and allows us to co-create a different way of practicing Catholicism. The practice of the seven sacramentals is what he calls the Dao of being a "kindom" Catholic.

"Culture eats strategy for breakfast" a remark often attributed to Peter Drucker, keeps coming to mind for me when thinking about Repair My House. In my experience, the current culture of Catholicism does eat the strategy of Jesus for breakfast. Michael gives the reader tools for cultural transformation within Catholicism that allows the strategy of the Trinity to emerge in all its intended beauty on earth as it is in heaven. I invite you to give it a reflective read.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love the Church? Read this book...., July 12, 2012
This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Michael Crosby's "Repair My House" could have only been written by someone who is planted firmly in the second half of life. The reader delights in witnessing the outpouring of wisdom garnered and distilled over a lifetime of loving and challenging the Church. Crosby's main argument is that the Catholic Church has lost much of its relevance in the hearts and souls of many first world dwellers not because its essence is unimportant in our lives but because it operationally seems outdated, out of touch, and even oppressive. The primary reason for this, he argues, is that the current organizational model does not reflect the Trinitarian flow of God, as one would hope that God's macro instrument would do. Instead, we find that the Church is mired in a dysfunctional model of hierarchical clericalism that both discourages reformation within and encourages dependency without, keeping the faithful "in the status of children rather than of mature adults in their personal faith" (p. 45).

Thankfully, he offers a way out through a reinterpretation of an organizational model based upon a Trinitarian critique that would reclaim the communal nature of early Church, employ a Catholic dao (rituals or practices that help us become aware of our oneness with the universe and with each other), and engage the world through empathy, "the gateway to compassion" (p. 205). He argues that if a Trinitarian model defined the Church, then transparency, mutual relationality, non-violence, and an institutional structure based on a holarchy (web of relationships) rather than a hierarchy would be key characteristics.

Throughout the book, Crosby engages the intellect and the spirit. He draws upon the work of quantum physicists, Scripture, Popes, contemporary theologians, psychologists, current media outlets, his own experiences, among others. This is a must read book for anyone who loves the Church and is concerned with the current direction the leadership is taking it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life Changing, August 5, 2012
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This book changed the way I look at life in Christ, life in the church, social justice, and morality. Fr Crosby uses the best of the Franciscan tradition to make Trinity and Christ's preaching the launching point for Christian thought. In my humble opinion, a masterpiece.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fr. Michael Crosby is a prophetic voice, August 5, 2012
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
I just purchased two more copies of this book. That makes 10 copies I have bought since I first read it. I am giving them to friends, family members, fellow Catholics and even a few priests. Anyone searching to make sense of how we move beyond the Church in crisis should read this book for an understanding of what the Gospel calls us to do. Fr. Crosby's explanation of the Trinitarian roots of the Church make it clear that the Catholic Church is no longer following the will of God. Yes, strong words. In trying to save the institution, aka the Vatican, the Church today forget the people in the pews who are longing for their leaders to bring them the Good News. Fr. Crosby is correct in saying that without compassion, challenge and continuity, we are left with a Church fixated on control. That is not the God we have come to love. If you only read one book about what is happening in the Church today, this should be that book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book but better half as long, December 26, 2012
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
In his book, Repair My House, Capuchin Franciscan Friar Michael Crosby addresses the manifold crisis facing the church of the West. Among other things, the main evidence of this crisis involves a hemorrhaging of church participation as evidenced by a precipitous drop in membership and the ever-declining influence of its clerical leaders with regard to their teachings.

Among his several references to Pope Benedict XVI, Crosby says he completely agrees with the pope that the real crisis facing the church in the western world is a crisis of faith but also says he believes that "one of the key reasons for this crisis is the functioning of the historically determined structures of the Catholic Church itself and the fact that these structures do not reflect the organization within the Godhead we know to be triune."

Crosby then claims that the evidence reviewed in his book suggests that the crisis of faith in the church of the West is not about faith in the Spirit as much as it is about the lack of faith in, as well as the decline in meaning of, the "official" institutional church itself, especially its hierarchal form of governance. He also claims that the examined data suggests:"Any repair of the institutional model of the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) demands a return to the core message of Jesus' proclamation of the kingdom of God, by which I mean the rule of trinitarian connectedness that must be in evidence at all levels of life, including the governance of the church. This will demand a new way of being Catholic."

Crosby discusses these notions in three parts: Part I -- Catholicism and Apocalypse: Tradition Eclipsing Scripture, the impact of the various forms of contemporary atheism on Catholicism and the parallel crisis in the RCC; Part II -- Jesus' Dao of the Kingdom: Reclaiming the Metaphor, the need to understand this crisis in apocalyptic terms in a way that invites a return to the core evangelical message of Jesus Christ; and Part III -- The Dao of being a kingdom Catholic, The practice of seven contemporary sacramentals, the need to develop a revitalized way of being "Catholic" that entails a form of contemporary discipline that is grounded in clear cosmology that is Christ centered, consciously aware, deeply connected and connecting, contemplative in its core, compassionate in its witness, and communal in its bonding.

Unfortunately the discussions take a wobbly path throughout. A good deal of the material, especially in Part II, could have been eliminated or left to appendices. This, so as not to encumber readers with unnecessary forays into obtuse discussions of topics that do little if anything to fortify his core message.

Not to be overlooked in the maze is the author's lucid discussion, early in Part I, of the two poles on the continuum of how Catholics view church, namely: Culture I (Matthew 16) Catholics and Culture II (Matthew 18) Catholics and his discussion of the the seven sacramentals in Part III that are essentially described in the appended prayer that is usually attributed to St. Francis.

I took the wobbly path making frequent referrals to the dictionary and to Google in search of the meaning of obscure words and terminology. In any case, this is a good well researched book but a difficult book to read. It brought to mind two things: 1) Occam's razor, the law of parsimony, economy, or succinctness -- a principle stating that among competing hypotheses, the one that makes the fewest assumptions should be selected, and 2) the stern-minister father in the movie A River Runs Through It, who on reviewing and re-reviewing the writing of his son, the young Norman Maclean, says, "Again, only half as long."
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Prayer of St. Francis: Lord, make me an instrument of your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love. Where there is injury, pardon. Where there is doubt, faith. Where there is despair, hope. Where there is darkness, light. Where there is sadness, joy. O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled, as to console; to be understood, as to understand; to be loved, as to love. For it is in giving that we receive. It is in pardoning that we are pardoned, and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life. Amen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Repair My House, October 21, 2012
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Good Vatican II theology applied well. However, Crosby is distracting with all his self-inflating insertions to reach a point. He could have said as much more simply in fewer pages.
Sometimes obtuse and you wonder where he is going, but that's all part of his construction. On balance, a worthy read if you have time.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Repair my House: Becoming a Kindom Catholic, August 25, 2012
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
This book was a very challenging read for me. I frequently
found myself rereading the previous paragraph in order
to glean the full meaning of what was being written. It
did take me longer to read this book than planned but upon
finishing it I found myself with a different mindset of
what it means to be a follower of Christ.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New view of church, February 23, 2013
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Fr. Crosby give one a totally different view of where the Catholic Church is today. His presentation make you stop reading and really think of what you have read and most of the time one will agree with him a 100% of the time. His title of the book are the words of Christ to Francis and should be the church's words today.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Father Crosby tells it like it is mincing no words about the conflict between ..., November 23, 2014
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This review is from: Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic (Paperback)
Marvelous book. Lots of food for thought about the Catholic church today and the future part that women could potentially play in the propagation of the gospel message. Father Crosby tells it like it is mincing no words about the conflict between Culture I and Culture II in the present day Catholic church. Father C. explains the "Trinitarian" nature of the church in thought-provoking ways with (excuse me, Father) a "fools rush in, where angels fear to tread" courage that brings all things (literally) together.
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Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic
Repair My House: Becoming a "Kindom" Catholic by Michael Crosby (Paperback - March 19, 2012)
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