Repeaters and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by monarchbooksusa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Repeaters Paperback – September 17, 2011


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.95
$13.45 $8.98


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 382 pages
  • Publisher: Waking Dream Press (September 17, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981574114
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981574110
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #780,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Named to Kirkus Reviews Best of 2012
Recently optioned for a feature film

"With prose this poetic, it's easy to forget that this is a horror story...more than a battle of good and evil, Ferencik's story is rich with layers, well developed characters, and moments of gruesomeness and tenderness. A petrifying tale of a chain of reincarnations." - Starred Kirkus Review

"Mary Shelley gave us Frankenstein and Erica Ferencik gives us Dr. Astra Nathanson in Repeaters...This is one scary story that readers who like their thrills bloody will love." - Alan Caruba, Bookviews

"Repeaters is the story of black and murderous love, a cautionary tale that, in the hands of the gifted Erica Ferencik is often terrifying and truly unforgettable. You'll be riveted by this bold and brilliant novel." - Mary E. Mitchell, Love in Complete Sentences

"Repeaters is an original and much recommended novel, not to be missed." - James Cox, Midwest Book Review

"Astra is one of the most monstrous villains ever written." - Margot Huysen, Blogcritics

"Repeaters is terrifying new novel that takes you to the darkest netherworlds of the human heart. Not a book to begin at night if you need to sleep before dawn." - Robert Tremblay, Gatehouse Media

"A chilling, suspenseful, erotic read." - Chris Mooney, author of Remembering Sarah

"A wild read - sexy, scary and smart...a one-of-a-kind take on reincarnation." - William Walsh, Questionstruck

"An exciting new voice in horror." - Betsy Fitzgerald, October Run

"A riveting supernatural thriller filled with reincarnation, romance, and the vilest villainess this reader has ever encountered. Truly, a chilling page-turner!" - Jeffrey Thomas, Deadstock

From the Author

Q: What is Repeaters about?
Repeaters is the story of a young girl who comes back to avenge her own murder by her mother's hand.

In my own life, my mother was at one point successful - metaphorically - in  killing me. She erased my self confidence, my sense of self, of my own worth. She was that kind of mother.


Decades of therapy later, I came back, in a sense. I learned that the best cure would be to not only become myself, but to not become what had created me.

But I never completely stopped being haunted by the possibility of somehow becoming her. After all, she looked like me; we shared similarities: humor, intelligence. She was also not like me: she was manipulative, cruel, and lacked a conscience.

Q: What are your thoughts on the mother/daughter bond, in particular?

I think many of us are lucky to have one "good" parent, and I think you are truly blessed to have two normal, kind and loving ones. I also think that there is something especially life-shaping about the mother-daughter bond. If things are positive, you can grow a certain way: usually up and out, you reach for the sun. If things are bad, you're like a tree growing forever sideways, damaged by years of heavy snowstorms.

And yet, as in many abusive relationships, we stay in it, hoping it will get better. I found that no matter how awful my mother was to me I had this yearning for connection, for some kind of recognition of my own good as a daughter and as a person. 

There is also the constant refrain: she's my mother, how can I stop trying? I think so many of us are in these terrible cycles with our parents, because they are our parents, regardless of who they are as people. Even with all evidence saying: this will never work, part of us never stops trying to create some sort of bond, even after death.

Astra, who is the evil Repeater in the book, keeps referring to this bond. She keeps saying to Lucy, her murdered, reincarnated daughter: you can't stay away, can you?

Q: Do you have any personal experiences with reincarnation?

When my brother died at age 27, it seemed I would run into him about once a week for a year. After that the sightings seemed to peter out, but in the beginning I saw him all the time.

My brother was very tall and thin, with blond hair with lots of cowlicks. He took his life in September of 1987.

On a rainy night in October of that year, I was walking through Harvard Square, and saw a man in a long coat. He had exactly my brother's build, precisely his loping gait, his wet blond hair plastered to his head. I ran to catch up with him. He turned the corner onto Church Street, but when I got there, he was no where in sight.

Days before Christmas that year I was having dinner with friends at Redbones in
Cambridge. Through all the smoke and crowds, I caught sight of a man with my brother's profile. He even had the same distracted air; the same way of talking with his long, thin fingers.


The following spring, at a crowded party, I heard my brother's laugh in another room. I muscled my way in there and found a short, fat man laughing my brother's laugh. 

I knew it was wish fulfillment. That we seek as well as manifest what we desire, wherever we look, whether conscious of that seeking or not.

Q: Is your mother still alive?

My mother died in 2005.  She had such an intense personality, a presence, life force, that no matter how sick she got, I couldn't imagine her dead.

When my mother was alive, she used to call me every day, which was one reason I hated the phone. This was before caller ID, so I would just helplessly pick it up when it rang, my heart in my throat. At least she never copped on to the internet.

Anyway, my mother died on a Saturday.

On Sunday morning while I was in the shower, the phone rang. As usual, my heart sped up, my breathing grew rapid and shallow, fight or flight response ensued. I stood there, shampoo in my hair, frozen, just listening to the phone bleating from the other room. I had to calm myself, tell myself: she's dead, of course it's not her. But still, I stepped out of the shower, grabbed a towel, and went to the phone. I stood there dripping, listening to the answering machine pick up, my outgoing message playing, and finally, to the caller.

Whoever it was, hesitated. The person's breathing was labored, just like my mother's was in her last days. After a good thirty seconds, they hung up.

My hand was shaking so hard I could barely get the phone back in its cradle. I closed my eyes and forced myself to remember signing her death certificate the day before. But I couldn't help myself. The power of her will was so strong. She was dead, so what? She could still pick up the phone...

Q: So that was the inspiration for the story?

Exactly. If my mother could return from the dead, why not others? Why not a race of Repeaters?

And why would they come back? Two reasons made sense to me: you return  if your life is taken from you with violence, or if you haven't yet accomplished the most pressing of unfinished business: loving at least one human being on this earth.

But being a fiction writer, I wanted to take it further. I thought, what more evil character could there be than one without empathy?

Q: The book is very visual, almost feels like a film. What movies influenced you in the creation of this story?

I wanted to create the quintessential evil female character. I think she is underserved. We have so many evil male characters, Hannibal Lector in The Silence of the Lambs, Freddy in the Nightmare on Elm Street series, Jason in Friday the 13th movies, your serial killer of the week - usually male.

I've always been fascinated with intelligent horror movies, because that is what I grew up with: intelligent horror. Especially David Cronenburg, who is one of the originators of "body horror," or the physical manifestation of the psychological. Stigmata, I guess. Cronenburg did The Brood, The Fly, Dead Ringers, among others. The scene in The Exorcist where the daughter, Regan writes HELP from the inside of her own stomach, as the monster outside rages on, or when she's contorted like a crab and walking backwards up the stairs, are good examples of body horror: or the graphic destruction or degeneration of the body.

Q: Can you share a bit about what sort of research you did for the book, if any, and a little more about past and present day beliefs in reincarnation?

According to recent polls, 24% of Americans and 38% of the population of the world believe in reincarnation.
 
In Repeaters, I mixed the Hindu and Western concepts of reincarnation. Hindus believe that there is no transfer of personality, only a transference of pure energy. Western thought dictates that the actual person reincarnates, including personality traits and memories.

As sources I read books by Ian Stevenson and Jim Tucker, both university researchers. It took Ian Stevenson forty years to research over 2,500 cases. In his book, Twenty Cases Suggestive of Reincarnation, Stevenson documented each child's statement, identified the deceased person the child referenced, and was able to verify the facts of the deceased person's life with the child's memory.

He also matched birthmarks and birth defects to wounds and scars on the deceased, verified by medical records such as autopsy photographs. The vast majority of the deceased had met some sort of violent or untimely death.

The Sanskrit word "samsara," translated loosely as "continuous flow or passing through states," refers to the cycle of birth, life, death, and rebirth.

Freedom from samsara, or of the cycle of reincarnation, is known as moksha or nirvana, which is freedom from existence in the physical plane. You will not be born again.

This the state that Astra, after repeating over a hundred times, was trying to achieve through what she perceived as loving another human being. Trouble is, she got it wrong.

More About the Author

In a brilliant departure from her acclaimed work as a satirist, novelist Erica Ferencik proves herself a master of spine-chilling suspense with her new novel "Repeaters," which has just been optioned for film and named to Kirkus Reviews' Best of 2012.

"Repeaters is wild, sexy, scary and smart...a one-of-a-kind take on reincarnation."
- William Walsh, author of Questionstruck

Robert Tremblay of Gatehouse Media says: "Repeaters takes you to the darkest netherworlds of the human heart...not a book to begin at night if you need to sleep before dawn."

Step into the demi-world of beautiful, ruthless Astra and her kind - unearthly creatures condemned to endless reincarnation unless they can love a human being.

Erica Ferencik is an award winning novelist, screenwriter, filmmaker and standup comedian, and has been a featured guest on NPR's "Morning Stories." Her comic novel, "Cracks in the Foundation," called "hysterical" by Alex Beam of the Boston Globe, features Ginger Kanadoo, a hapless, drunk, desperate realtor who will stop at nothing to seal a deal.






Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
34
4 star
5
3 star
5
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 45 customer reviews
I can hardly wait for her next book to come out!
Harlequin Smith
"Repeaters" is a gripping, terrifying, page turner of a read.
Steven Gentile
Great plot, good character development, great writing.
Lilalma

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By GK on October 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
I read a lot of books but I don't normally write reviews. I just had to comment on this book though. I am not scared by slashers and I am not squeamish about blood splatter. Hence I find much of the horror / thriller genre too boring to waste precious time reading. What makes a good creepy thriller is a great story told in a way that it takes you out of the world you are really in and places you in to a world that you really don't want to be in. You don't dare stop reading. This disturbing other-world is like an imp sneaking around in some dark corner of your mind and your only hope is it might just leave you alone if you finish the book. You can check out the other reviews for information about the plot line - I just had to write to tell you this is one well written creepy read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Daniela P on December 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
Being one of those people who usually avoid supernatural thrillers and the horror genre, I reluctantly started Repeaters on a Friday evening for a leisurely weekend read. I could not put it down till 3 am in the morning after turning the last page. This is no ordinary shape-shifting/zombie/reincarnation story. Not only is the writing engrossing, the fast-paced narrative gripping, the play on `grand themes' of Freudian mother-daugther rivalry (turned on its head) just subtle enough, but the author's take on such themes is truly original and audacious. Once immersed in the story, the twists and turns of the plot keep you on your toes; what grabbed me most was the masterful handling of surprise in the gut-wrenching first and last scenes, which could almost live on their own, like ambiguous cautionary tales... From the first scene of avian infanticide I realized this would be an unsettling tale: I was, indeed, riveted by the unorthodox take on motherhood, sexual rivalry, loyal and lustful love, and the seemingly never-ending power of evil. Or can the latter be stopped? How about, for a start, loving the undeserving, the malevolent, the vile, those dangerous and threatening to us? What if we love what we know is bound to kill us? What could happen, indeed? I hope the next story is already in the making, don't miss this one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Steven Gentile on November 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
"Repeaters" is a gripping, terrifying, page turner of a read. Yikes. If lead villainess Dr. Astra Nathanson met Cruella DeVille and Glenn Close's Alex Forrest from Fatal Attraction in a dark alley, my bet is on Astra to emerge with both heads on a platter, all the while sipping a fine chardonnay. Literature, as well as film, has been sorely lacking non-cliched, wicked women lead characters to chew the scenery, and Erica Ferencik fills the void! Worth the read for anyone who likes their horror to have a touch of dark humor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Thomas on November 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was really swept up in this novel; one of those couldn't-wait-to-turn-the-next-page deals. REPEATERS is a riveting supernatural thriller filled with reincarnation, romance, and the vilest villainess this reader has ever encountered. Truly, a chilling page-turner. Its plot concerns reincarnation, and those -- called Repeaters -- who are aware of their reincarnated state, and how they can become trapped in an immortality of endless reincarnation. The antagonist (at times -- and maybe these are the best parts of the book -- she comes across as a dark protagonist) is Astra, a many-times reincarnated soul who yearns for love, a love that will deliver her from her cursed immortality, even if it means doing some very evil things to achieve it. Astra is truly, truly bad, and yet, while she isn't likable, I did pity her in a way -- she's like a patheric, self-centered child. She's of course a sociopath, but more than that, a walking id devoid of the restraints of conscience, and in a scary way I could relate to her primal desires. Besides its strong characterizations, there are a couple of plot turns in this novel that will make your head spin. Read this...I REPEAT, read this!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Cesca on November 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
I saw a short piece on Erica Ferencik and Repeaters on The Framingham Beat on Access Framingham, and decided to get the book. Loved that it is set in recognizable communities in New England. Astra is a great name for an Evil woman. I think it takes guts to twist the empathy out of motherhood. A supernatural thriller that isn't too out there. A fun read on creepy October nights. Loved how it came together in the end...also hoping for more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By bindi frazz on November 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
I found Astra to be a great character: scary, intelligent, and believable. You don't know what's going to happen next in this book. It's a satisfying story that will definitely make you think about reincarnation in a completely different way! I very much enjoyed reading this book. Ready for the prequel!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nina on October 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
Loved this book. It elegantly weaves together complex, thought-provoking, exciting themes: the supernatural; a proffered possibility of what might happen when we die; really evil rotten people who at last may get what they deserve; clueless men; mothers & daughters; romantic love (both the good, deep, profound, kind and the dangerous, erotic, it's-all-physical kind). The characters are richly developed and brought to life (so to speak-- spoiler alert!) with careful, sympathetic detail-- very visual. And I really enjoyed the evocative descriptions of the settings where the action takes place, for example, the gorgeous beach home on the north shore; the quintessential New England college campus; the hardscrabble walk-up apartment in the chilly coastal fishing village. This is a great book to curl up with under the afghan on a cool fall or winter evening. It's fun, yet leaves you with lingering serious things to think about regarding the afterlife, love, and loyalties. It would make a fantastic movie.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search