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Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (Culture, Media and Identities Series) Paperback – April 1, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0761954323 ISBN-10: 0761954325 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Sage Publications & Open University; 1 edition (April 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761954325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761954323
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #237,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stuart Hall was born and raised in Jamaica and arrived in Britain on a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford in 1950. In 1958, he left his PhD on Henry James to found the New Left Review, which did much to open a debate about immigration and the politics of identity. Along with Raymond Williams and Richard Hoggart he established the first Cultural Studies programme at a British university in Birmingham in 1964, bringing the study of popular culture into the understanding of political and social change.

After spending more than four decades as one of the UK’s leading public intellectuals, Hall retired from formal academic life in 1997 and since then has continued to devote himself to questions of representation, creativity and difference. He became the chair of two foundations, Iniva, the Institute of International Visual Arts, and Autograph ABP, which seeks to promote photographers from culturally diverse backgrounds, and championed the opening of Iniva’s new Rivington Place arts complex in east London in 2007.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Smallridge on December 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
If one is going to read about Marxist culture for a university course, Stuart Hall's work is not terrible (and, in places,, quite astute). Yes, he speaks in academic jargon, but his thoughts on "encoding and decoding" and on race are useful for understanding our present moment. In all, his arguments are decent and this work is as good of a place to start as any.
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47 of 68 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this text for an intro class to Cultural Studies, and I really enjoyed it. Hall discusses the issues of race, gender, and class in our society in many interpretations within this text. He shows how all these three are interconnected, and does so in a fascinating way. The question of how did we become the way we are in society is addressed in various ways through different representations: the media, culture, and ourselves. A lot of historical aspects is presented in this text to give the reader more of an answer to the previous question. This text is great for someone who is into cultural studies, or anyone who is interested in just learning more about themselves and making sense of the society around them.
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By Julie on June 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had to have this book for a class on representation and power, but I would have read it cover to cover anyway. I will never think about photos or journalism or displays the same way again. My eyes are open. Stuart Hall is a master of media theory in my humble opinion. I appreciate the accessibility of the material and the real examples. Also recommend Veils and Daggers by Linda Steet for the same eye opening look at representation.
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This is easily my favorite textbook to date and I reference more often than I realize in conversation. I was simply disappointed that I somehow missed the "rebinding" when searching my options on price and seller. If you are a Communications student or want a better grasp on how culture is manufactured via representation, then you NEED this book.
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This book could have been a little more full of oomph...but it was more dull and repetitive than anything else.
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