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The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events) Hardcover – May 26, 2003


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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: A Series of Unfortunate Events (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Egmont Books Ltd; 1ST edition (May 26, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405208686
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405208680
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 5.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (509 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,577,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The Reptile Room begins where Lemony Snicket's The Bad Beginning ends... on the road with the three orphaned Baudelaire children as they are whisked away from the evil Count Olaf to face "an unknown fate with some unknown relative." But who is this Dr. Montgomery, their late father's cousin's wife's brother? "Would Dr. Montgomery be a kind person? they wondered. Would he at least be better than Count Olaf? Could he possibly be worse?" He certainly is not worse, and in fact when the Baudelaire children discover that he makes coconut cream cakes, circles the globe looking for snakes to study, and even plans to take them with him on his scientific expedition to Peru, the kids can't believe their luck. And, if you have read the first book in this Series of Unfortunate Events, you won't believe their luck either. Despite the misadventures that befall these interesting, intelligent, resourceful orphans, you can trust that the engaging narrator will make their story--suspenseful and alarming as it is--a true delight. The Wide Window is next, and more are on their way. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

"If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book." So cautions Snicket, the exceedingly well-mannered narrator of these two witty mock-gothic novels featuring the misadventures of 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus and infant Sunny Baudelaire. From the first, things look unfortunate indeed for the trio: a fire destroys their home, killing their parents along with it; the executor of their parents' estate, the obtuse Mr. Poe (with a son, Edgar), ignores whatever the children have to say; and their new guardian, Count Olaf, is determined to get his hands on the Baudelaire fortune. But by using their individual gifts (Violet's for inventing, Klaus's for reading and researching and baby Sunny's for biting) the three enterprising children thwart the Count's planAfor now. The author uses formal, Latinate language and intrusive commentary to hilarious effect, even for readers unfamiliar with the literary conventions he parodies. The peril in which he places the Baudelaires may be frightening (Count Olaf actually follows through on his threats of violence on several occasions), but the author paints the satire with such broad strokes that most readers will view it from a safe distance. Luckily for fans, the woes of the Baudelaires are far from over; readers eager for more misfortune can turn to The Reptile Room, for an even more suspenseful tale. Exquisitely detailed drawings of Gothic gargoyles and mischievous eyes echo the contents of this elegantly designed hardcover. Age 9-up. (Sept.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Lemony Snicket claims he was nowhere near the scene of the crime. He is the author of several other unpleasant stories, including those in the bestselling A Series of Unfortunate Events and The Lump of Coal.

Customer Reviews

This book is a great read for anyone aged 8 years or over.
johnny h
If you enjoy reading stories where no-one is very happy in the end and the villain gets away, this is probably the book for you.
KNO2skull
The author's vocabulary was very simple and easy to understand.
Nick V.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By rzaster on November 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Fans of Lemony Snicket will not be disappointed with the second book int "The Series of Unfortunate Events."The Reptile Room is the story of our three lush characters, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. In this volume they visit Uncle Monty and they finally for once since their parents died having a good time. When Uncle Monty tells the children that they will be going on an expedition to study snakes they get even more riled up. But Uncle Monty's assistant mysteriously disappears so he hires a replacement. And guess who this is- Count Olaf. And he has a plan to get our favorite trio like never before. Sit back, relax and click the BUY symbol on your computer. Read this book. You will love it.
HAPPY READING!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 14, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The Reptile Room is in the same format as The Bad Beginning, which is to say, it's excellent!! I love both of these books and am eagerly awaiting The Wide Window, the 3rd book in this series. Keep up the good work Mr. Snicket!!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on March 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
And on we move to the second book in the classic Series of Unfortunate Events. If you've stumbled onto the Lemony Snicket series by chance, I wouldn't necessarily command you to read the first book before this, the second. But you'd probably wish to do so yourself. Following the further adventures of the unfortunate Baudelaire orphans, we find our intrepid trio finally living with a relative they've grown to love. Uncle Monty (as he prefers to be called) is a herpetologist of the finest pedigree, and he offers the siblings the first real home they've had in a while. Unfortunately, misery continues to dog them in the form of the evil Count Olaf. Donning one of his many disguises, Olaf does his darndest, yet again, to get his oily hands on the Baudelaire fortune. And so forth.
One of the finest books in the series, no question. And, perhaps, one of the saddest. After all, Uncle Monty is one of the few guardians with whom the orphans feel a real kinship. Snicket does a lovely job displaying their affection for him which simultaneously not making you too too terribly unhappy when that joyful confluence must break apart. Happiness is not in store for the Baudelairs for some time now. We shouldn't be wishing it too soon. Still, Uncle Monty's exit is a real blow to the series in that you really do come to like him before his removal from the book. Just the same, there's plenty to love. I, myself, was quite taken with the movie, "Zombies In the Snow", that the Baudelaires watch with heavy hearts at one point in the proceedings. Hollywood should take note - "Zombies In the Snow" may be the next big storyline to hit!
For happy book involving ponies, locate one of the bazillion pony books out there. For misery, delightful redundancy, and a truly gross villain I direct your attention to Snicket's latest. Tis a wonderful read for the whole gosh-darn family (though he'd be loathe to say so himself).
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 8, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Don't get me wrong. I LOVE the Harry Potter Books, but these books just go above and beyond everything that makes a book fun to read, enjoyable, and of high quality. This book is about the three orphans Sunny, Klaus, and Violet, when they go to live with their Uncle Monty (full name Montgomery Montgomery). When a new servant (Stephano) comes to the house, he seems familiar, to familiar.... This book is slightly better than the first book (A Bad Beginning), and Lemony Snickett never fails to impress! Keep up the good work, Lemony!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "emmc" on January 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Continuing in the Goreyesque manner of the first book, The Reptile Room delivers the delightfully miserable story of our three heros. A smart, and sly narrative keeps this one a page-turner, and the author's almost non sequitur mentality raise this book (and series)high above the dull, run of the mill, "kiddie-adventures". As with the first, charming illustrations head the chapters, and the narrators devilish tone helps keep the humor of the situation ever present. I look forward to the third entry in the series. Highly recommended!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Lemony Snicket is one of my favorite authors. "The Reptile Room" is a book that really gets into the details of the Baudelaire orphans' time at their Uncle Monty's house. A viscious villain named Count Olaf plans to steal the enourmous fortune that the orphans will inherit as soon as the oldest orphan, Violet comes of age. I did not give this book five stars because it goes through, at one point, almost every single reptile in the reptile room. I can't relate because I know nothing about snakes, and I cannot tell whether the species are real or fake. Even though some readers think his books are so dark and depressing, I don't think his books are that depressing and that here is no need for that added detail. Overall, I think it is a very good book and recommend it to kids who love a fun mystery.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 2, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Here we are again with the three Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus and Sunny. In the first book their parents died in a fire and things went drastically downhill after that. Eventually ending with evil Count Olaf, a distant cousin, the trio tried to convince Mr. Poe, somewhat of a guardian, that Count Olaf was evil. At the end of the book Count Olaf ran away after his various machinations were unmasked. However, the ending was not happy because once again the orphans did not have a home.
In this second book, we meet Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, or Uncle Monty, as he likes being called. At first the reader might believe that Uncle Monty's house is a bad place, for it is filled with snakes, including those of a poisonous variety. However, the children quickly realize that Uncle Monty is actually a very nice guy, and keeps a very clean and organized house. Soon the children actually begin to lead a normal life.
As our erstwhile author periodically enjoys pointing out, life is not to be happy for the Baudelaire orphans, and Count Olaf appears once again, though disguised. It takes very little time for Uncle Montgomery to be killed; and once again the orphans risk being in a very bad situation. Eventually, through the cleverness of the orphans, you must know that Count Olaf will somehow be unmasked, and the children saved, though to what end?
This book was not quite as dark as the first book, and the implied sexual situations relating to Violet did not appear to exist in this book, for which I was very happy. However, death reappears in this book, and Count Olaf remains the evil person he was in the first. Thus this book is likely unsuitable for most younger readers and age 9 should likely be a reasonable minimum.
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