Republic (Oxford World's Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$9.45
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.95
  • Save: $0.50 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Republic (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – May 15, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0199535767 ISBN-10: 0199535760

Buy New
Price: $9.45
59 New from $4.97 66 Used from $2.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.45
$4.97 $2.99

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Republic (Oxford World's Classics) + Princeton Readings in Political Thought
Price for both: $53.35

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199535760
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199535767
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,559 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'a fine new translation' The Observer

About the Author


Robin Waterfield is a distinguished translator and author. Previously a consultant editor for Collins-Harvill, his translations of Plato include Philebus (1982), Theatetus (1987), Early Socratic Dialogues (1987), and Symposium (WC, Jan, 1994).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Nathan P. Gilmour on July 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
I've been using the Oxford World's Classics edition of Republic for three years now to teach freshmen, and Waterfield's translation and endnotes are great. His choice to render dikaiosyne as "morality" rather than "justice" allows a range of discussion with American students that travels outside the courtroom and into the purpose of life and what translation means, and his crankiness in the endnotes (he talks about Plato as an old lover talks about his beloved) allows some great lessons about editorial practices and what's involved in the production of a scholarly edition.

Perhaps more important to my students than anything, this edition of Plato is right at ten bucks, a steal compared to their other textbooks and an invitation to mark up, use, and abuse the margins. I'm sitting at my desk, my battered copy of the 1998 printing sitting next to my keyboard, and I'm thinking that perhaps this fall I'll pick up a copy of this blue-sky beauty.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Clayton C. Chou on February 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Among all the translators of Plato's Republic who claim that their translations are intended to be readable, Robin Waterfield seems to be the only one to have truly fulfilled the pledge. His translation has demonstrated a simple belief that Plato meant for his Greek to be as readable and fluent as in an everyday conversation and that is exactly what Mr. Waterfield is doing with his modern English --- without assuming that there is a built-in difficulty in all the classic literatures. Because, he believes, "reading Plato should be easy; understanding Plato can be difficult." A rare combination of the knowledge of classic philosophy and the writing of children's fiction to his credit must have contributed to the admirable achievement of clarity and directness.

In addition to readability, Waterfield has also made a unique contribution by abandoning the traditional "ten books" design (which was not made by Plato himself anyway) and regrouped them into "fourteen chapters" following the natural flow of the internal arguments in the texts. It is therefore only too logical for him to give each of his fourteen chapters a title and a brief introduction, not only for convenience but also to provide an overall scope of the book, which is in fact the longest and most complicated of all Plato's dialogues. Of course, he has no need to give up the standard means of reference to passages in Plato and the reader still feels quite at home with the conventional setting started as early as in 1578. To an avid reader, this new translation in Oxford World's Classics is an invaluable addition to his existing collection, large or small.

One more point deserves our special admiration.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By steven on November 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
I never understood the Republic until I read this translation....there are great notes that go with the text, and the result is you really learn something.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 8, 2014
Format: Paperback
Like other Waterfield translations, this one is great in that it gives you:

--A helpful introduction
--A translation which emphasizes readability and flows nicely
--PLENTIFUL endnotes on various passages in the text. These explain various points of potential confusion, elucidate references Plato is making, and in general answer a lot of questions you might have when reading the text.

But as a big bonus, this translation gives you section summaries every few pages, describing what's going on in plain language!

If you're a student looking for a good edition of Plato to study with, this is highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Plato's text is easy to read, but difficult to understand, which is why this edition is so good. I have a hard copy and Kindle version of Waterfield's translation which was also used by Simon Blackburn in his own book on the Republic.

Here's my take on the book after multiple readings of this and other translations.

There are two ideas of the 'good' at play in the Republic.

Firstly, the idea of the 'good' as doing the right thing; what we call ethics or justice, this is the traditional idea of the Good presented by Glaucon in the Republic. Plato shows this to be inadequate at the beginning of the dialogue. The other, is the idea of the 'good' as something constituted, in such a way, that it can fulfil a particular purpose; this something, might be a household implement, an individual human being, or a community of human beings. The function of a knife is to cut, while the function of human beings, is to live and prosper. In order to cut, the knife must be sharp, and easily handled; in order to live and prosper, human beings must be healthy, and well provided for. Plato goes on to show, that this idea on its own, is also inadequate, and that the two types of 'good' are integral to something, much broader and deeper, than just ethics or function. This broader and deeper conception of the Good is Plato's imaginative project in the Republic; but before he can present his ideas, he looks to understand, how human beings are constituted, and how ethics or justice, have been formulated, to facilitate life and prosperity.

Justice is the 'business of everyone performing their task ... the principle that each single individual is to perform his own task without troubling himself about the tasks of others'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?