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4.7 out of 5 stars
Rescue & Restore
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on June 30, 2013
I've been a fan of ABR since 2005 when I saw them on tour with Demon Hunter and Zao. I wasn't a huge fan of their first album "Thrill Seeker," but I knew they had great potential. When their next album, "Messengers" came out I was completely blown away. I hear a lot of people talking about "Constellations" being ABR's best album. I disagree. With Rescue and Restore ABR went back to more of the "in your face" metal from Messengers. To me, that is excited. To me, R&R and fresh and I feel the time and effort they put into the album. I love how they dedicated themselves to being different and unique on this album. Some fans will hate it and others, (like myself) embrace it and love it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 2013
This is a great album. Not only is the music complex and interesting, but the lyrics really set it apart in the metalcore genre. In my opinion, this is one of the best metal albums released in the past few years. A lot of long-time fans are taking the "I like their old-stuff better" road. We get it. You've been listening to them for years. Take it from someone who hasn't really been a super fan over the years... this one's good.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on June 30, 2013
This is an absolute masterpiece of an album. This is what metalheads should have people listen to when non-metalers say "everything is so evil and depressing in metal." These guys weave their spirituality seamlessly into commentaries on the human condition. Calling for peace and helping "others while we're still alive" while reminding fans not to "call me your hero" are themes present not only in this album, but also in our lives. The music is equally powerful in conveying this positivity through melodies that are at once light hearted, yet serious and heavy when they need to be. Rescue and Restore is still very much August Burns Red, and it feels more like Constellations with a few moments throwing back to Messengers.

A few highlights of this album are the lead guitarist's solos. Metal solos these days are all about speed and technicality, and while there is a place for that, guitarist Steve Morse had a great song called "tumenni notes," and sometimes (not always) that's all these speed solos have. Often times a well placed note that creates the right feel, timing, and phrasing is more important than being able to play six-string ascending and descending 16th note sweeps at 250 beats per minute in conjunction to the breakdown in the background.

Also of note is the bassist's screaming (correct me if I'm wrong on which member is doing the backing screams). Since Leveler (their previous album) his screams have become more pronounced and add an additional dimension and depth. Both he and the lead vocalist have some of the clearest and more unique screams in the industry.

Finally, the drummer has always been inventive, and, at times, unconventional. He has to reflect the music the band writes and his perspective, as well the rest of the band's, is unique. Some of his beats are catchy in and of themselves even without guitars and such accompanying him.

Needless to say, this cd will be worn out within a few weeks. This is the band's best release yet, and if they keep putting out music in the future then there will be much to look forward to as they get better and continue to grow and mature their sound.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 2013
This CD is the most inspiration metal music put out within the last year, hands down. ABR has done it again.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2013
I had high expectations for this album, and they definitely exceeded them. It's such an interesting and carefully put together album that it really does give every fan something that they're looking for. On Leveler, it seemed like they were going in a direction that was less heavy and more experimental, basically trying to just change it up so that they didn't always sound the same. While I certainly respect that, I feel like they didn't accomplish this task until this album. All eleven songs and 49 minutes of listening are worth it. And I mean all of it. But please beware: it has a high chance for addiction, so listen responsibly.

The album opens with the right track in "Provision," starting off very heavy with the chorus and punching you square in the face, leaving you with that characteristic euphoria you get after hearing a new metal song for the first time that you immediately love. And the good thing about this is there are another ten songs after this one. The second song "Treatment," which many of the band members said was their favorite track, has an interesting interlude in the middle of the song that starts out really slow and with different instruments (maybe a violin or viola, I can't exactly tell) but builds up over time and slowly re-adds each instrument from the original song into the fold until lead singer Jake Luhrs begins screaming again, creating a really cool effect.

Then comes the best song on the album, "Spirit Breaker," which includes myriad of vocal techniques, mixing screams and yells and a little singing, including another interlude that has Luhrs just talking as if he's reading a letter. The lows in this song are excellent and definitely makes it a 10/10. "Sincerity" has some cool gang vocals in the chorus and "Creative Capacity" is basically a showcase of the creative wonders of the guitarists and drummer until Luhrs enters later on in the song (minus the barely audible vocals he has in the beginning). "Animals" is extremely heavy and is another 10/10 track in my opinion. If you're looking for the heaviest ABR possible taken to the next level, then that's your song.

I never thought they would do it, but they've actually made their best album with this one. As shown by my reviews of their past three albums, they seemed to be slowing declining (that's not to say they were putting out bad albums, they were just a little less awesome as the years progressed). But they definitely regained their status as presently one of the best metal bands in the country and maybe even the world. I give this album a 9/10. Awesome job August Burns Red, you've made me very happy, and gotten a lot of fans addicted on your new music. I say that's mission accomplished.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2015
August Burns Red is much more than just talented a metalcore band. They are passionate, and their energy infects their songs. ABR albums are fast-paced, aggressive, and exciting. Rescue & Restore can stand up to their previous outing, the excellent Leveler. They tried to experiment this time around, bringing in several unfamiliar instrumentals to spice up their sound. The result is hit or miss, but always curious and interesting.

Songs I particularly enjoyed were probably a bit more of the straightforward sort. Sincerity, Animals, and Provision gave me more of the tight, clean metal that ABR is known for. There is no doubt that ABR is going for a versatile, artistic theme on this album with all the variety and experimentation. As a metal album, Rescue & Restore is lesser than Leveler. As an album, it may be better, depending on what kind of music you appreciate.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 2013
Didn't know what to expect from this album, but it is a truly AWEsome evolution of the band's sound and creation. True to their roots, but innovative and fresh in many ways. Driving beats, gorgeous melodies/solos and divine breakdowns that'll get any headbanger crushing their skulls on the dashboard!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2013
I've been a fan of ABR since I first heard Constellations. So when I heard they had a new album coming out, I was stoked. And they didn't disappoint. The music is blistering in its intensity and beautiful in its execution. Their vocals are perfect and I love how they've mixed growled, screamed, and clean vocals. My favorite songs of this album that demonstrate this mix are Beauty In Tragedy and Spirit Breaker.
Additionally, I love the meaning behind Beauty In Tragedy. Such a beautiful song. I highly recommend this album.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on June 25, 2013
On their fifth studio album, AUGUST BURNS RED continue to develop into one of the best metalcore bands there ever was with RESCUE AND RESTORE, which is also one of the best albums of the year. I'm actually very surprised that AUGUST BURNS RED had branched out much more than they have on previous records. Not to say that this album strays away completely from metalcore, but there are certainly a number of different musical instruments brought forth into their sound, such as stringed instruments, congas, and even a horn section at the end of CREATIVE CAPTIVITY, which is my least favorite track and is actually a terrible song. (I'm not going to knock this album down because of it, but still, the song is horrible. I won't go into detail here, but please listen to the song in full, and you'll see why I don't like it.) They even tune down their guitars to Drop B for the songs PROVISION and FAULT LINE, which is right up there with PARADOX and WHITE WASHED as one of the best AUGUST BURNS RED songs. Also, Dustin (the bassist) has more of a presence on this record, both vocally and musically, and even though Jake Luhrs is beast when it comes to vocals, Dustin's contribution is definitely not a bad thing! Overall, if you want an honest metalcore album that is set to break boundaries more than ever before, pick this album up.

Rating: 4.9 stars/5 stars
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on November 23, 2014
When it comes to the music world there are inovators and there are those who go, “that was pretty cool, lets do something like that.” August Burns Red has always been on the trendsetter side of the equation, but with Rescue and Restore, they are making a statement about that fact. Feeling that the metalcore genre has become overly saturated with too similar riffs and tones, ABR “turns a critical eye to the oft-maligned genre, leading by example to prove that bands can still find exciting new ways to expand the genre without simply falling into repetitive trappings.”

“Rescue & Restore is about challenging other bands and ourselves, as well as fans of this music, to want more
than whatever happens to be the current buzz,” explains guitarist and principal songwriter JB Brubaker. “We’ve
done our best with each new album to try to push our sound in new directions and we’d like to see our peers do
the same. People need to realize that there’s not much of a difference between a metalcore song that has a
couple breakdowns with a repeating chorus and the latest Lady Gaga song. This genre used to be better than
that. It can still be better than that” (ABR official Press release).

Considering such bold statements, Rescue and Restore needed to live up to more than just the inevitable hype of a new album, it needed to blaze a trail. It would be impossible to fashion an album around such a bold mission statement and then rest back into the all-too-familiar trappings of the genre. As fans already know, however, ABR never stands in one place. Fans know never to expect the same thing twice.

Rescue and Restore lives up to the bold mission statement of leading the metalcore genre to new destinations. Despite the global popularity of their last full studio album Leveler, ABR does not simply rehash or repackage their past work, but seeks to lead the genre itself into new and more creative soundscapes. A perfect example of this can be found on the aptly titled “Creative Captivity,” which opens with a seemingly Asian themed sound, the Spanish sounding guitar work on “Treatment,” strings on “Spirit Breaker,” and oh so much more.

That being said, ABR does not delve into experimentation as much as, say, Becoming the Archetype did on Celestial Completion or Hope for the Dying did on Aletheia. The core of this record is still that signature August Burns Red sound that created a global fan-base for the band. It still has those signature deep growls and guttural moments, and of course it has some of the best musicianship across any genre…Just don’t be surprised by the fact that you’re just as likely to hear Jake Luhrs break into Me Without You-esque spoken word as you are to hear him obliterate his vocals.

Rescue and Restore begins with “Provision.” “Provision” begins to introduce the dual themes that come across as the album moves on. It is both tied to what the ethos of the record itself is, and it incorporates a challenging spiritual message. Lyrics like, “Losing it all lead me to You,” and “it’s times likes these you forget to remember who you are… I’m just as much the problem as the man behind bars, he did with his business what I do in my heart.” It is at this point in the review that I usually mention something about the musicianship on a particular song, but… this is August Burns Red. The musicianship across the entire album is varied and phenomenal.

“Treatment” follows with an above-par metalcore excursion set apart by the spanish guitar influenced interlude. The song takes a hard look at faith and states, “stop telling us what happens when we die, start helping us… while we’re still alive.” The song asks us to weigh our motives when it comes to how and why we interact (and share the faith?) with others.

“Spirit Breaker” is not afraid to break pace mid-stream and just enjoy some beautifully somber melodies. This is one of the key tracks to look for spoken word to make an appearance. While the use of it adds flavor to the song as a whole, the way in which it is read sounds a little stilted, as if Jake were reading a letter someone else wrote (yes, I realize JB does much of the writing, but you get the point).

“Count it all as Lost,” which may take it’s title from Phillipians 3:8, starts out with a harrowing admission that, “I want to believe these words are more than letters to me… (but), I keep breaking my promises… I need You here.” The song is a great redemptive track that focuses on the lostness of our broken state set against the promise of new life. As with “Spirit Breaker” there is a great musical break, though not as divergently “Spanish” in sound.

“Sincerity” hits hard with some great metalcore that doesn’t diverge, but certainly leads the pack in skill and execution (and has some fantastic lyrical depth). The great diversion is left to “Creative Captivity.” Tying itself most closely with the theme (mentioned above) of the album, this is a song not afraid to explore. As mentioned above, “Creative Captivity” starts out with an edgy Asian melody that quickly blends into a rock flavor with muted screaming behind it.

More than any other track, “Creative Captivity” needs to prove what the band is setting out to do by leading the metalcore genre. Had this track fell flat, so would their message. Luckily, the absolute mastery of instrumentation and light use of any vocals at all seem to beckon and cry out for more experimentation and instrumentation across the chug-a-chug-a’s and double bass pedals-centric genre. “These colors must never fade,” seems almost a warning to other musicians, while “we will fight to save this…this is a cause worth fighting for… we will rescue and restore,” prove the central battle cry of the album. Nicely enough, the track concludes with horns blaring.

“Fault Line” takes a step back and looks at the idea of carrying the banner from an intimate perspective. The lyrics, “If I could do more, I promise I would, but this is your time… Scream your sorrow, proclaim your love, just don’t call me your hero,” are a direct challenge to the musical world to step up and innovate.

“Beauty and Tragedy,” a track that lives up to those two divergent word pictures, features some of the best musicianship (which is saying something) on the record, while also packing lyrical dynamite. From the rolling thunder to the very real feeling of cold air coming through the speakers, Jake once again uses spoken word (this time much more effectively) to proclaim, “tomorrow the world will be a little colder, but I’ll be sure to breathe for both of us… I can’t hear your voice, but that’s ok, because I can feel you in my heart.” The way atmospheric elements are used in cooperation with the spoken word track almost reminded me of some of the better moments of Blindside’s The Great Depression or With Shivering Hearts We Wait.

“Animals” is pretty straightforward. There is a little bit of fry screaming (or closer to it), and some very interesting guitar licks. The message “we are not animals” points to a more eternal worth each person should look towards. “Echoes” begins with simple, yet deep, guitar work that continues to show just how massively talented ABR is (but, you knew that). The incorporation of clapping adds to the environmental sounds prior to the onset of the screaming, as well. The line, “celebrate new life,” repeated throughout, points to a future for the band’s beloved genre (as well as the condition of the human spirit), and implies that there is still much more to come.

In closing the album out, “The First Step” cements this bold two-fold declaration of hope for music and for the human condition through Christ with hopeful proclamation. “We’re so scared to take the first steps…why? The ground you walk on isn’t a straight line…don’t let the world pass you by.” As the closing song, “The First Step” is basically the hero moment. It is Maximus telling the evil Commodus that he will have his revenge in this life or the next. It is William Wallace telling the scared masses that “they can take our lives, but they can never take our freedom.” The words “we will replace the old guard with the new,” are spoken with such passion that they would certainly be fitting if they were coming out of Russell Crow’s Jor-El in the new Man of Steel movie.

The message is clearly, “we aren’t afraid to pick up the mantle and wear it… but, don’t follow our path, blaze your own. We’re still moving forward. Come with us, let’s move this thing forward together.” As a closing track, this is very effective. You leave the record emboldened and ready for the battle that is yet to come. You walk away energized and ready to take the high ground.

Overall: In the end, Rescue and Restore balances two themes with one outcome. This is a record about the brokenness of the human condition and the staleness of the metalcore genre. Yet, it is a battle cry to both. For our lives, there is restoration and rescue from the maker of our souls. For metalcore as a genre, it is a bold proclamation to step it up, innovate, and blaze new trails. The message is clearly, if not a little cocky, we’re going to take this thing to new levels, so either come alongside us or get left behind.

As with any August Burns Red album, this self-assured message is backed up with such massively powerful and skillful musicianship that no one should take issue with ABR claiming the mantle and calling their genre to arms. Rescue and Restore is just exactly what it sets out to be, it is a tight and cohesive musical experience that isn’t afraid to innovate musically and then look at their peers and say, “Okay, now it’s your turn.”

RIYL: For Today, Ark of the Covenant… August Burns Red (I mean we compare most other heavy bands to them, so that should say something, right?)
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