Buy Used
$6.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Orion LLC
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is lightly used with little or no noticeable damage. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy, 2nd Edition Hardcover – February 1, 1990


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$4.99 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 609 pages
  • Publisher: Genealogical Pub Co; 2nd edition (February 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080631267X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806312675
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.2 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #190,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This classic handbook has been completely updated to include all major developments since the original edition ( LJ 6/15/74). Three new chapters cover genealogical evidence, personal computers, and family historians. The bibliographies have been updated as well. Greenwood's pioneering contribution offers a detailed examination of primary records: vital, census, probate, land, court (adoption), church, military, cemetery, and wills. Librarians will appreciate chapters on other types of research, especially library research. Ronald A. Bremer's Compendium of Historical Sources: The How and Where of American Genealogy (Progenitor Soc., 1986. 3d ed.) and Arlene Eakle's The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy (Ancestry Pub., 1984) are similar all-in-one genealogy handbooks. With this edition, Greenwood has reaffirmed his book's position as the outstanding text in American genealogy, and it remains the benchmark against which others will be judged. This modestly priced core collection reference tool should be in every genealogical library and in other libraries where there is an interest in genealogy.
-Judith P. Reid, Local History & Genealogy Reference Specialist, Library of Congress
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

Greenwood's guide has long been regarded as the best of its kind, a text and reference work for anyone who is doing American genealogical research beyond the beginner's level...Purchase of Greenwood's guide is recommended to any serious genealogist, and every genealogical library should have this latest edition on its shelves. --The New York Genealogical and Biogaphical Record

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

More About the Author

Val D. Greenwood was born during the Great Depression and was raised on a Utah family farm. He graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism and from the University of Idaho with a Juris Doctor degree. Though a member of the Utah State Bar until retirement in 1999, he worked for the LDS Church for thirty-seven years with assignments that included being a researcher and writer in the Family History Department and a faculty member at Ricks College (now Brigham Young University-Idaho). For the final nineteen-plus years he worked in the Temple Department and was a director in that department for fifteen years.

His first book, "The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy," first published in 1973 and in its third edition since 2000, is now considered by many to be a classic and has for many years been the standard textbook for those who study and those who teach American genealogical research.

His most recent work is a book of 229 Old Testament stories for adults and young adults titled "How Often Would I Have Gathered You." An enhanced second edition of that book is being published in 2013. More information about both the Old Testament and the book are available at www.NewViewOldTestament.com.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
I look forward to putting this reference book to good use.
J. Nalder
It is filled with some really good information for beginners, like what records are available and where to find them.
Michael Shelmet
This book was purchased as a textbook for a research class.
Selma Blackmon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 22, 2002
Since its first edition in 1972, and especially with the completely revised and greatly expanded 2nd edition in 1990, this comprehensive work has become the standard guide and textbook in the pursuit of U.S. genealogical research. Beginning with the background to research -- what "research" actually means, specialized terminology, basic principles, library fundamentals, and all the rest -- Greenwood teaches you, with great clarity and many examples, how to identify what information you need, how to go about locating it, and how to organize it once you've found it. The second, much larger part of the book, leads the reader through the use, analysis, and interpretation of all the major sorts of documents and records out there: Compiled sources (including a discussion of the nature of compilations), vital records, census returns, wills and probate records (and how to become comfortable with legal terminology), local and federal land records, civil and criminal court records, church records, records relating to immigration, military records, and cemetery and burial records. He discusses the nature of abstracting, clears up common misconceptions about court records, points out the limitations of the census, and presents a largely rewritten discussion of the standards of evidence. When the 2nd edition came out a decade ago, the author thought his book would probably never need another major revision, just minor updates. But that was before the personal computer and Internet revolutions forced him to rethink his position, and this edition includes an entirely new and rather lengthy chapter on the appropriate use of the computer in genealogical research and also on its built-in limitations. He also took the opportunity to add a chapter on the legal issues relating to women's property rights, and (of course) made all those minor corrections and updates he had expected. Bluntly, if you can afford only one how-to book for your home genealogy shelf, get this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on March 4, 2000
Now in a fully updated and expanded third edition, Val Greenwood's The Researcher's Guide To American Genealogy continues to be the definitive introduction and guide to conducting genealogical research in the United States. It is both a textbook and an all-purpose reference book that is the core title for any personal, professional, and community library genealogical reference collection. Clear, comprehensive, up-to-date, "reader friendly", The Researcher's Guide To American Genealogy provides an essential, highly recommended account of the methods and aims of American genealogy today and will prove ideal for the novice genealogist in conducting a sound genealogical project.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By LaMont Bankson (lamont@ioninc.com) on September 21, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This book moved me to really begin studying my family history in depth. The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy explains where to begin to look for your roots, and what these sources reveal about your ancestors. It also prepares you on how to keep the data you've gathered organized. A must for the beginner and the experienced alike
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Scott Carpenter on June 15, 2001
Everyone seems to agree that this book is the standard text in genealogical research. The reason for this is the inclusion of sufficient detail to be useful without sacrificing scope and breadth of coverage. Prior editions gave short shrift to the computer revolution in genealogy. The third edition remedies this. Why not five stars? The writing fails to inspire. Granted this is a textbook on a sometimes dry and technical topic. The author also provides the right approach to the topic by focusing on story telling, basic research and avoiding beginners pitfalls. But I am still looking for the genealogy book that takes the topic to a high level. Genealogy is not just about correct principles, accurate research or even the stories that Val Greenwood encourgages us to write. Genealogy is about identity, individual, familial and national. If we are satisfied merely to explore our curiosity and to get the facts straight, then this is a dead science. No one seems more qualified than Val Greenwood to lead us into this deeper meaning. Perhaps a next edition or thinner separte volume will take us there.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on June 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
An excellent reference recommended for libraries building basic collections on genealogy. Val Greenwood's Researcher's Guide To American Genealogy, 3rd Edition provides important updated links between computers and genealogical research, including chapters on property rights of women, new insights on the evaluation of genealogical evidence, and updated information on the 1020 census.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 1997
Format: Hardcover
I have used this book for the past 6 years while discovering my roots. It provides guidance when you think you have hit a brick wall. The references included are accurate and useful to any family historian.

Greenwood hits the mark while many others try to imitate his style.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Selma Blackmon on May 21, 2007
This book was purchased as a textbook for a research class. Had I known this valuable and helpful information, much of my past research time would have been shortened and to the point. Especially great is the rational behind the suggestions and the reviews of important points.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Shelmet on December 1, 2012
Verified Purchase
I purchased this book for an introductory course I took on genealogy. It is filled with some really good information for beginners, like what records are available and where to find them. It may be a little dated, especially with some of the internet references, but everything else still seemed spot on.

I would recommend this for anyone who is looking to seriously start doing genealogical research as a good starting point for where to find records.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews