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The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy, 2nd Edition Hardcover – February 1, 1990


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 609 pages
  • Publisher: Genealogical Pub Co; 2nd edition (February 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080631267X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806312675
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.2 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #953,540 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This classic handbook has been completely updated to include all major developments since the original edition ( LJ 6/15/74). Three new chapters cover genealogical evidence, personal computers, and family historians. The bibliographies have been updated as well. Greenwood's pioneering contribution offers a detailed examination of primary records: vital, census, probate, land, court (adoption), church, military, cemetery, and wills. Librarians will appreciate chapters on other types of research, especially library research. Ronald A. Bremer's Compendium of Historical Sources: The How and Where of American Genealogy (Progenitor Soc., 1986. 3d ed.) and Arlene Eakle's The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy (Ancestry Pub., 1984) are similar all-in-one genealogy handbooks. With this edition, Greenwood has reaffirmed his book's position as the outstanding text in American genealogy, and it remains the benchmark against which others will be judged. This modestly priced core collection reference tool should be in every genealogical library and in other libraries where there is an interest in genealogy.
-Judith P. Reid, Local History & Genealogy Reference Specialist, Library of Congress
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

Greenwood's guide has long been regarded as the best of its kind, a text and reference work for anyone who is doing American genealogical research beyond the beginner's level...Purchase of Greenwood's guide is recommended to any serious genealogist, and every genealogical library should have this latest edition on its shelves. --The New York Genealogical and Biogaphical Record

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers --Government Publications Review

This work is still the single best reference and text for the serious beginning genealogist. --American Reference Books Annual, 1991

Greenwood's book is easy to read and covers a broad enough spectrum of resources that readers are equipped to get started with a minimum investment of study time. For those who want to learn how to build pedigrees and reconstruct family groups, tying them from one generation to the next, this book is an excellent guide...This book also has value to other researchers. Historians, demographers, and sociologists studying people in the past will find that this book will provide important guidance in assessing which records will provide the facts needed. Government document librarians will appreciate having this book to refer to in answering questions about censuses and other sources created by national and state government. It is still one of the best guidebooks on genealogical research available. It is an important title to include in collections of libraries with patrons interested in genealogical research. --Government Publications Review

More About the Author

Val D. Greenwood was born during the Great Depression and was raised on a Utah family farm. He graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism and from the University of Idaho with a Juris Doctor degree. Though a member of the Utah State Bar until retirement in 1999, he worked for the LDS Church for thirty-seven years with assignments that included being a researcher and writer in the Family History Department and a faculty member at Ricks College (now Brigham Young University-Idaho). For the final nineteen-plus years he worked in the Temple Department and was a director in that department for fifteen years.

His first book, "The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy," first published in 1973 and in its third edition since 2000, is now considered by many to be a classic and has for many years been the standard textbook for those who study and those who teach American genealogical research.

His most recent work is a book of 229 Old Testament stories for adults and young adults titled "How Often Would I Have Gathered You." An enhanced second edition of that book is being published in 2013. More information about both the Old Testament and the book are available at www.NewViewOldTestament.com.