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Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter Hardcover – October 31, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0674055674 ISBN-10: 0674055675

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674055675
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674055674
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #511,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

At last, a book that leaps past the current work-family debate. It is time to free women and men to nurture their children and support their families. Brilliant! (Joan Blades, co-founder of MoveOn.org and MomsRising.org)

An incisive analysis that is both a joy to read and a must read. Williams shows that work-family conflict is not just an issue for women's magazines; it is at the core of what ails America. Changing the way we think about gender in the workplace is the first step toward a more politically potent progressive agenda, and this book illuminates the path forward. (Heather Boushey, Senior Economist, Center for American Progress)

In this sensible and erudite book, Williams exposes the myths that have dominated work and family policy discussions and argues for the inclusion of men's activities and differences by class. By adding these crucial dimensions, she points the way toward simpler, smarter, and more sober analyses. (Michael Kimmel, author of Manhood in America: A Cultural History)

A very important book. Skillfully cracking popular myths about the 'average family,' Williams offers a fascinating analysis of the importance of workplace culture, the code of masculinity, and class blindness in perpetuating widespread work-family tensions. (Sharon Hays, author of Flat Broke with Children)

Reshaping the Work-Family Debate cements the position of Williams as one of the most imaginative and influential legal theorists and activists of her generation. Every American citizen--female and male, rich and poor--who is part of a family or a workplace will benefit from wrestling with the ideas of this visionary realist. (James T. Kloppenberg, Harvard University)

This book will transform how we think about work and family issues as it shows how gender traditionalism and recent culture wars are fueled by the hidden injuries of class. Long a leader in the work-family field, Williams guides us to solutions that make sense in today's world. (Naomi Cahn, co-author of Red Families v. Blue Families)

This ambitious book is a much-needed breath of fresh air in the recycled atmosphere of debates about work-family conflicts and the stalling of the gender revolution. (Cecilia Ridgeway, Stanford University)

This refreshing, empirically based book offers solutions for a wide-ranging audience: business leaders, diversity professionals, and executive coaches; and for men and women struggling to understand why equal sharing is so hard to achieve at home, and work-family balance is so hard to achieve at work. (Robin Ely, Harvard Business School)

In her brilliantly insightful new book, Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter, Joan C. Williams suggests that in order to finish the stalled gender revolution it will be necessary to incorporate both men and class into discussions of work-family conflict. Williams writes beautifully and one of the many strengths of the book is her ability to synthesize massive amounts of disparate research from the law, sociology, psychology and politics, and turn them into one compelling case for change...This book will join Williams' first, Unbending Gender, as a key piece in the canon of work-family scholarship. It is essential reading for all work-family scholars across a wide range of disciplines...It should be added to the pantheon of other contemporary gender scholarship that has moved the work-family debate forward...It is my hope that it will also prove to be essential reading for politicians seeking progressive solutions. (Sarah Damaske Sex Roles 2011-03-04)

The most engaging and thought provoking portions of the book are those focused on understanding how masculinized workplace social norms are restrictive to both men and women and the fact that such norms are reflective of the devaluing of caretaking in our society. In doing so, Williams helps to place societal discussions of work-family into a broader context, thereby highlighting the crucial roles played by larger social forces (such as the structure of workplace organizations and gender norms) in shaping the work-family decisions made by men and women...Williams' commitment to effecting real change in work-family policy is refreshing, and she does place needed emphasis on social class and concrete political strategies. Readers of Reshaping the Work-Family Debate will not only be encouraged to think about work-family issues differently, but will also be impressed with Williams' dedication to the coalition building she views as necessary to bring about meaningful social change that allows everyone to lead healthier, more balanced lives (Krista Lynn Minnotte Teachers College Record 2011-02-15)

Williams is eloquent on the stresses created for both men and women by a workplace culture that relies on the old image of the hard-working, always available husband and the stay-at-home wife. She unmasks the fact that women do not drop out of the workplace, as the media often claim, but rather are pushed. (Jean Hardisty Women's Review of Books 2011-07-01)

About the Author

Joan C. Williams is Distinguished Professor of Law, 1066 Foundation Chair, and Director of the Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

More About the Author

Joan C. Williams has played a central role in reshaping the debates over women's advancement for the past quarter-century. Described as having "something approaching rock star status" by The New York Times, Williams was awarded the American Bar Foundation's Outstanding Scholar Award (2012), the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award (2012),the ABA's Margaret Brent Award for Women Lawyers of Achievement (2006), and the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award for Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What to Do About It (Oxford University Press, 2000). In recognition of her interdisciplinary work, Williams gave the 2008 Massey Lectures in American Civilization at Harvard University, delivered in prior years by (among others) Eudora Welty, Gore Vidal and Toni Morrison.

Williams, who is Distinguished Professor of Law and Hastings Foundation Chair at University of California, Hastings College of the Law, has authored or co-authored six books. She has written over seventy law review articles, including one listed in 1996 as one of the most cited law review articles ever written. Her work has been excerpted in casebooks on six different topics.

As Founding Director of WorkLife Law (WLL), Williams has played a leading role in documenting workplace bias against mothers, leading to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's 2007 Guidance on Caregiver Discrimination. Her article "Beyond the Maternal Wall: Relief for Family Caregivers Who Are Discriminated Against on the Job," 26 Harvard Women's Law Review 77 (2003)(co-authored with Nancy Segal), was prominently cited in the landmark case, Back v. Hastings on Hudson Union Free School District, 365 F.3d 107 (2d Cir. 2004). Williams has organized social scientists to document workplace bias against mothers, notably in a 2004 special issue of the Journal of Social Issues titled "The Maternal Wall" (co-edited with Monica Biernat and Faye Crosby), which received the Distinguished Publication Award of the Association for Women in Psychology.

Williams also has played a central role in documenting how work-family conflict affects working-class families, through reports such as "One Sick Child Away From Being Fired" (2006), "Three Faces of Work-Family Conflict" (2010) (co-authored by Heather Boushey of the Center for American Progress), and "Improving Work-Life Fit in Hourly Jobs" (2011). Williams' current research focuses on how work-family conflict differs at different class locations; on the "culture wars" as class conflict; on how gender bias differs by race; and on the role of gender pressures on men in creating work-family conflict and gender inequality.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Caitlin Martin on November 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Joan Williams does a tremendous job of altering the terms of the public discussion about working, caregiving, and work-family conflicts. The book is packed with data about family leave policies in this country and others. It also carefully documents some of the disadvantages that men, particularly those in blue collar jobs, experience in the workplace. This book is essential for anyone who wants to be informed about cutting edge work-family issues. It is also terrific from a narrative perspective. Professor Williams dismantles many press-constructed narratives about the working world and instead brings forth stories in the workers' own voices.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Reckless Reader on August 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book has more ideas in one chapter than most authors manage to put into a lifetime of books. Its ideas on men and class as the keys to full equality are well worth examining. But, and it's a big but, the author has chosen to write in academese, which is to say, she has chosen to make much of the book almost unapproachable by any except a small coterie of fellow academics who write as though providing lots of footnotes and references to each other improves the quality of their ideas. Perhaps she will find herself able to write more approachably on these topics on the future.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martine Ceberio on March 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book itself could be good, and I believe that the paper version should be. However, if you have any interest in checking data in tables, DO NOT buy the kindle version. All tables are missing and replaced by a link to an online PDF. That does not work for me as I do not necessarily have online access when I read, and besides, this is not a pleasant reading to have if you need to leave your book every so often to get the missing data (that should be in the book, online).
What disappoints me the most is that the kindle version was sold without any warning of this major flaw.
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