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Resisting Reagan: The U.S. Central America Peace Movement Paperback – June 15, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0226763361 ISBN-10: 0226763366 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 484 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 15, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226763366
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226763361
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,625,439 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Sociology, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society, and director of the Center for Social Research at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers and Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture.

More About the Author

Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society, and the Center for Social Research at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of many books, including What is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up (Chicago 201); Passing the Plate: Why American Christians Do Not Give Away More Money (OUP 2008); Soul Searching: the Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers (OUP 2005), Winner of the 2005 "Distinguished Book Award" from Christianity Today; and Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture (OUP 2003).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on November 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
Christian Smith wrote in the Introduction to this 1996 book, "One of the most interesting and significant of these foreign policy-oriented grassroots movements in the U.S. was the Central America peace movement of the 1980s. In this movement, more than one hundred thousand U.S. citizens mobilized to contest the chief foreign policy initiative of the most popular U.S. president in decades. Ordinary citizens marched in the streets, illegally housed refugees fleeing persecution... all on the assumption ... that common people can and should shape national forgeign policy. Amazingly, however, the U.S. Central America peace movement of the 1980s has received scant attention in both the popular and academic literature... Indeed, many scholars appear unaware that it ever existed... no work has been published to date that attempts to analyze the movement broadly by examining together a variety of primary movement organizations at a national, movement-wide level." (Pg. xvi-xviii)

He adds, "This book investigates the macro-level forces that generated the Central America peace movement, but also the people at the grass roots who actually made the movement happen on a daily basis... I attempt in this book to weave together narrative, analysis, and theory... I seek to draw from this story general observations about the nature of human social life and action." (Pg. xix)

He notes, "the Central America peace movement actually ended up absorbing much of the faltering anti-nuclear movement." (Pg. xvii) He observes, "The U.S. Central America peace movement was not a unified, monolithic entity. Few social movements are. It was, instead, a broad assembly of individual and collective actions and organizations, all of which challenged U.S. Central American policy in some way." (Pg.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Pallister on September 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
Christian Smith's analysis of the Central America peace movement is an excellent (and extensive) social movement case study. Smith employs social movement theory to understand the emergence and trajectory of the movement, and despite the academic orientation of the book, Smith's jargon-free writing is accessible to a general audience. I found Smith's analyses on the whole to be persuasive. The book's only shortcoming is that Smith's writing is not very concise, and some parts drag (especially in part 2 on the emergence of the movement). But otherwise, Resisting Reagan is a valuable book for anyone interested in this particular case of organized resistance to U.S. foreign policy or in social movements more generally.
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