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Resonance Mass Market Paperback – May 22, 2007


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Baen (May 22, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416521348
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416521341
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 5.2 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,299,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Chris Dolley is a New York Times bestselling author, a pioneer computer game designer and a teenage freedom fighter. That was in 1974 when Chris was tasked with publicising Plymouth Rag Week. Some people might have arranged an interview with the local newspaper. Chris created the Free Cornish Army, invaded the country next door, and persuaded the UK media that Cornwall had risen up and declared independence. As he told journalists at the time, 'It was only a small country, and I did give it back.'

In 1981, he created Randomberry Games and wrote Necromancer, one of the first 3D first person perspective D&D computer games.

In 2004, his acclaimed novel, Resonance, was the first book plucked out of Baen's electronic slushpile.

Now he lives in rural France with his wife and a frightening number of animals. They grow their own food and solve their own crimes. The latter out of necessity when Chris's identity was stolen along with their life savings. Abandoned by the police forces of four countries who all insisted the crime originated in someone else's jurisdiction, he had to solve the crime himself. Which he did, and got a book out of it - the International bestseller, French Fried: One Man's Move to France With Too Many Animals And An Identity Thief.

He writes SF, Fantasy, Mystery, Humour and Memoir. His memoir, French Fried, is an NY Times bestseller, a number one bestselling travel book on Amazon US, a number one biography, travel and entertainment book on Amazon France and has spent over a year in Amazon UK's bestseller charts. His novelette, What Ho, Automaton! was a finalist for the 2012 WSFA Small Press Award. And his novelette, Magical Crimes, was the number one bestselling free short story at Amazon UK in December 2011.

He's a director of the author-run publisher, Book View Cafe.

Customer Reviews

I hope they make a movie of it someday.
Wampuscat
At the very least read the first 10 or so chapters which are up for free on the publisher's website.
A. D. Orndorff
In addition to its great background the book scores on the foreground characters and plot.
Francis Turner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Francis Turner on December 8, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book has the sort of thought provoking background that is the hallmark of good Science Fiction as well as a plot that keeps you turning the pages. Since I dislike reviews that end up giving away the plot I shall attempt to restrict myself to generalities. The book is essentially about the existence of parallel worlds and what the implications would be if we could learn information from them. The concept is not completely new - Keith Laumer's Imperium comes to mind - but Resonance is quite different in the way it handles the scenario.

In addition to its great background the book scores on the foreground characters and plot. The interplay between the hero and various almost identical heroines is extremely good as is the depiction of the hero, who for good logical reasons, is extremely introverted preferring to present the facade of a mute rather than expose himself to the ridicule that follows when the world has changed around him and he comments on it.

The book is set primarily in various versions of London in the year 2000 and the depictions of the every day minutiae of life are, I think, very well done and true to life. If there is one thing that is missing it is the Google search engine, which seems to be absent from the author's world view despite being something that was visible in this world's London of the year 2000. This may seem to be a curious thing to comment on but the plot does in part revolve around internet searching and thus it seems to me worth pointing out where it misses.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Nunemacher on November 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Graham Smith lives in a world that is always unraveling. Houses are replaced by apartment buildings, stores change overnight, people disappear and the dead return as if nothing had happened. Is reality real; or is Graham the one stable factor in hundreds of virtual reality worlds?

Annalise Mercados is a medium. She channels hundreds of other Annalises that live in worlds where most things are familiar and yet subtle differences exist. The only thing they all know is that Graham Smith is important.

Paradim is a company building a worldwide AI directed database. Paradim knows about Graham and Annalise. What is so important that various factions within Paradim would be fighting over Graham Smith?

For a first novel, Chris Dolley has brought us a dozy of a mystery in the form of a science fiction story. When I first encountered the Graham Smith character, he reminded me of someone and then it hit me. Graham was `Felix Unger' brought into a new life and living in London.

I highly recommend this to anyone who likes mysteries, but fears to tread into pure science fiction.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
What do you do when your world keeps unraveling on you? People you saw yesterday have been dead for years ... or people who have been dead for years show up for work and nobody blinks an eye? This is the world of Graham Smith. He has to keep notes in his pocket to tell him where he lives, because it may be different from one day to the next.

The situation that Graham (and Annalise) find themselves involved with holds your interest as you try to figure out what is going on along with them. Chris Dolley has managed something rare in Science Fiction, especially for a debut book: he has come up with Something New.

Highly recommended.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert Cicconetti on December 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I must say when I first heard about the book about a year ago (one of the first new authors picked out of Baen's e-slush system) I wasn't all that excited. (Character named Graham? Multi-dimensional story? Gets chased across universes along with a beautiful woman? Didn't Heinlein already do that in Job: A Comedy of Justice?) However, I was intrigued enough to purchase it, and I must say it was well worth the price.

Resonance's viewpoint character is Graham Smith. An odd man, obsessed with ritual and withdrawn to a point where most people think he is a mute. He keeps post-it notes containing all of the important details of his life (such as it is) and another note in his pocket with his home and work address. Everyone thinks he is a little nuts.. or is he just well adjusted to an insane world? People go missing, buildings change, and no one notices but him. Until he meets someone else who has.. a beautiful woman named Annalise. She hears voices.. but strangely enough they all think they're Annalise too.

Excellent book for a first SF novel. The tech details are there, but kept vague enough (and consistent enough) to avoid setting off the "You can't DO that!" alarm. Graham is hard to relate to at the beginning, but you get drawn into the world (and into the book) quite thoroughly, and you grow to like Graham as he develops. The characterizations are good. Overall.. 4.5 out of 5.

PS. Timothy Zahn has nothing to do with this book. There was some kind of mixup with the ISBNs of Resonance and Black Collar.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A. D. Orndorff on December 27, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I read the Advanced Reader copy made available through the Baen Publishing website. Aside from standard information such as the book's genre (Science Fiction), subject matter (parallel dimensions) and the quality of writing (excellent) which one finds in all reviews, I think the most appealing thing about the story was the style in which it was written.

Most books, in the process of reading them provide a certain feeling of anticipation. One always wants to know what's going to happen to so-and-so. There is that in this book. However, I found that in addition to the standard anxiety was this overarching desire to figure out not just the immediate action but also the why and wherefore of the universe that Dolley constructs. That is something, I think, that is not common to many books.

It is for this reason that I would urge anyone who even dabbles in science fiction to give this book a try. At the very least read the first 10 or so chapters which are up for free on the publisher's website. A google search of "baen books" with "Chris Dolley" will take you directly to his listing.
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