Buy New
$14.02
Qty:1
  • Was: $14.03
  • You Save: $0.01
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Respect Yourself: The Sta... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get up to a $1.06
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$13.99
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: CV Trading Corp
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Respect Yourself: The Stax Records Story

4.8 out of 5 stars 80 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Oct 02, 2007)
"Please retry"
1
$14.02
$12.99 $8.90
DVD
(Nov 13, 2007)
"Please retry"
$25.94 $7.43

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$14.02 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Respect Yourself: The Stax Records Story
  • +
  • Muscle Shoals
  • +
  • Standing in the Shadows of Motown
Total price: $28.50
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Funky. Emotional. Raw. Powerful. That was soul music in the Civil Rights era; and Stax Records did it like no other. Stax quickly became a hit-making machine, producing a massive catalog of Top 100 records that defined the "Memphis Sound;" such as "Soul Man," "(Sittin On) The Dock Of The Bay," "Green Onions," "Midnight Hour," "I'll Take You There," "Respect Yourself," "Theme from Shaft" and many more. Stax also launched the careers of a who's-who of soul music greats: Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, The Staple Singers, Isaac Hayes, Eddie Floyd, Carla and Rufus Thomas, Albert King and Booker T. and the MGs, to name just a few. Now, with the release of this exciting new DVD, Grammy-nominated filmakers Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville ("Muddy Waters Can't Be Satisfied") present the first comprehensive look at Stax, the greatest soul label of all time.

Amazon.com

The rise and fall of Memphis-based Stax Records remains one of the more compelling sagas in American popular music history. Founded in 1957 as Satellite Records, renamed in 1961 by blending the surnames of brother-sister co-founders Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton, Stax was Motown's funky Deep South counterpart. From its loose atmosphere came giants, including Otis Redding, Rufus Thomas and daughter Carla, Booker T and the MGs, Eddie Floyd, Sam & Dave, Albert King, Isaac Hayes, and the Bar-Kays. Recording in a converted movie theater, the earthy results were often as stunning and transcendent as anything from the equally loose Sun Records across town or Motown itself. While celebrating Stax, its triumphs and the genius of its artists and musicians, the documentary doesn’t shy away from the label's woes, like unexamined fine print that gave Atlantic Records, who distributed Stax, the rights to classic Stax masters. While it resurged following its sale, through the successes of Isaac Hayes, the Shaft soundtrack and legendary Wattstax show, those triumphs were a prelude to the label's final, ugly collapse. The redemption comes by detailing Stax's legacy into the 21st century. The DVD extra consists of rehearsal footage from the rehearsals for a Stax reunion show. --Rich Kienzle

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Stax
  • DVD Release Date: October 2, 2007
  • Run Time: 155 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000UD2K32
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,509 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Respect Yourself: The Stax Records Story" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This documentary on the Stax soul powerhouse is very well done. Fine mix of rare performance clips and interviews that puts the story in full perspective. Those who have seen the documentary on PBS may be disappointed in the small number of extra features (just a rehearsal cut of the surviving MGs, William Bell, and Isaac Hayes done earlier this year), but that's okay, as the documenary itself does such a brilliant job.

The scenes where Stax was temporarily ruined by gangsters is an eerie foretelling of the Suge Knight/Death Row saga involving rap music in recent times. At least Stax and Motown never had shootouts with each other in spite of their rivalry (the Motown musician's snobbish comments about Stax and Otis Redding in particular will shock and anger many fans today).

Miraculously, the documentary ends on a high note in spite of the thuggery, mismanagement, and failure to read the fine print that doomed the label for a number of years. The scene of Booker T. and the MG's perfoming "Time is Tight" (trust me, you'll know this if you hear it) as the label's fortunes crumble is a masterpiece of editing.

On the whole, this documentary is as entertaining and inspiring as it is informative. However, their rivals in Detroit (Berry Gordy and co.) need to get with it and put some of their stuff on DVD as Stax is doing such an excellent job with this, the Otis Redding documentary, and the 1967 Live Stax-Volt Tour DVD.

Support these so that more classic soul can at long last be available on non-bootleg DVD in America.
Comment 65 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film is the best, most comprehensive documentary on Stax Records ever released. It covers the entire history of Stax from its origins in Memphis to its resurrection as a part of the Fantasy Organization in the 1980s and 1990s. All the famous artists are there, unlike some of the other footage that has been released, starting with a French documentary in the early 1990s. It makes fascinating viewing for all Soul enthusiasts.

However, this is not meant to be a comprehensive review. This film's highlight is that it contains the rarest clip of Albert King EVER shown (this is besides his brief appearance in Wattstax and the bonus clip of him doing "I'll Play The Blues For You"). It is in colour and he is playing his break from "Blues Power". While the audio narration goes over part of this, if you are a Blues lover this is the rarest film of him ever shown. He is also playing his Korina wood Gibson Flying-V original "Lucy" (now worth in excess of $100,000). Wouldn't it be unbelieveable to see the entire concert--King at his height in the late 1960s! It is in colour and the sound is great too! To access it on the DVD-go to scene selection and view it from "CBS".

I apologise if my enthusiasm for this may be too much. But this is so rare, and even if it's only just over a minute, all Blues lovers should see this. It is at least 12 years earlier than anything ever released so far.

Plus the documentary is five stars too!!!!
3 Comments 44 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This excellent documentary on the classic Stax Records label emerges as a fascinating social and cultural overview. From Booker T. and the MGs to the Staple Singers, the Stax icons are seen in all their glory. Filmmakers Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville have done a remarkable job chronicling the soulful triumphs and brutal realities of the Memphis hit factory. "Respect Yourself" packs a dynamic musical punch.
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
The music made at 926 E. McLemore in Memphis, Tennessee has always been one of my passions. Funkier than Motown and every bit as innovative and important as Sun, Stax records turned out some of the best music ever recorded. So I was very excited to learn that Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville were directing a documentary about the history of Stax ,but after watching it, I feel that `Respect Yourself' falls far short of the glory of it's subject.

`Respect Yourself' has many flaws both as a film, and as a telling of the Stax story. First of all, the history of Stax can hardly be done justice in two hours. This is made all the worse by the directors apparent lack of understanding about using context to further a story. Martin Scorsese used context masterfully in his Bob Dylan bio, No Direction Home. He richly illustrated how Dylan's work fit into the society and time period it was a part of, and because of it he created a powerful film that can be enjoyed even by those who aren't Dylan fans. In `Respect Yourself' not a word is said about the history of Memphis music leading up to the creation of Stax, and the contemporaneous events in the music scene and civil rights struggles are given only very fleeting mentions (with the exception of the Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.). The ineptitude with context causes the director to constantly go back to interview snippets of people saying `this was the only place in the south where black people and white people could work together' which becomes repetitive to the point of being patronizing. (Ok, I get it, let's talk about the music, or at least WHY that was significant and HOW it was influential).
Read more ›
4 Comments 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Respect Yourself: The Stax Records Story
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Respect Yourself: The Stax Records Story


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video