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Responsive Web Design (Brief Books for People Who Make Websites, No. 4) Paperback – January 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: A Book Apart (2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 098444257X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0984442577
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #104,481 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Do buy the book from their website at abookapartdotcom.
Artemus Returns
Responsive Web Design is a must have book for any web developer wanting to stay current in designing for the ever changing desktop viewing landscape!
JBoulder
This book is short, light-hearted, and easy to read through the first time.
Brent J. Nordquist

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Karen D. Summers on December 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is available on A Book Apart. Do NOT pay 35.99 to someone for a book you can get for $23.00USD brand new.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By JBoulder on January 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Responsive Web Design is a must have book for any web developer wanting to stay current in designing for the ever changing desktop viewing landscape! After following many tutorials online, this book sums everything found online in a concise manner. Thank you Ethan for this easy to follow book!
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By filmbooksUSA on January 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
Here to second the other review - and if you don't mind reading it on a "screen", the epub/mobi/pdf versions are only $9 and instantly downloads.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brian Anderson on February 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
I tried to follow the examples but when the book said things like "At this point, we're going to skip a few steps in our exercise", they jumped so far ahead and provided no links to downloadable code to continue with that it was a real trick to follow along. The cooking turkey metaphor didn't map well to the process of jumping ahead when explaining CSS layout.

Cook turkey = 1 step
Move forward in code = style up backgrounds, add sections, divs, classes heirarchies, that don't exist yet.

Not the same thing...

I tried to take the finished code on their site and reverse it back to the phase where they were starting from, but that was just a mess and ultimately, I imagine there are other books better at following along.

It might be a good book if you want to memorize a bunch of principles and ideas, disregard un-followable examples and apply what they are saying to your own experiments. That might be good, but then I would just look for a straight forward technical manual.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sergey Golitsynskiy on January 5, 2014
Format: Paperback
I agree with a previous reviewer that you could read a good blog post in 10 minutes and learn everything that's in this book. The author explains in painful detail how to calculate percentages; he even suggests a formula (target + context = result) and refers to it over and over, plugging in pixels for divisions, images, more images... Are percentages really so complicated? Most of the book is a very detailed explanation of trivial hacks: how to set the width of this element, how to change it based on device resolution, etc.. - all that with specific numbers, code, and the percentage formula explained again and again. All that should have been a blog post and a page or two of code.

A few minor points:
1. You don't need 14 digits after the decimal point for your font size value. It won't add precision to your layout. It will only make your code less readable.
2. About the max-width property applied to images: "First discovered by designer Richard Rutter..., this one rule immediately provides..." (p. 45) Hmm... We discover stuff in science. In web development, or any other kind of development and engineering we "discover" rules by reading the specs. Or the manual.

That said, the book does a good job explaining what responsive web design is, why it matters, and what are its limitations, providing many useful references. Skip all the code and trivia, and it's a decent read.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rafael Camargo on September 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
I finished reading this book a couple weeks ago and like Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition it's a completely mindshift on the way you design a website. While the focus of "Don't Make Me Think" is usability, the focus of this one is "adaptability". Now, every single "not-responsive" website I visit seems me a view of the past web.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rich McNabb on April 23, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book does an excellent job of explaining the fundamentals and theory of responsive web design.

However the code examples used throughout the book don't build upon each exercise in a logical and easy to follow way method.

It's almost like there needs to be downloadable code for each chapter (which include start files and completed files). So you can orientate yourself and peek at the completed code if you get stuck. Sure there's a demo website but the code there differs from what's in the book...confusing!!

Wouldn't recommend it for someone just starting out!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Dude on January 8, 2014
Format: Paperback
First of all, I think this book (for only $9 from A Book Apart) is worth reading even though I gave it only 3 1/2 stars (although I can't display a half star).

The book explains responsive design well. The major problem I had with the book was the absence of source code. I downloaded the sample website, including the css, js, and images, so I could play around with the code. The book would have been much better if we could have started with the code for a website and converted it to a responsive design. A tutorial approach with source code and exercises would have given readers a better understanding. (I can understand the comment from the reviewer who said that he found the book difficult to follow.)

I thought the "mobile first" approach was a interesting concept--first defining a layout to smaller screens and progressively enhancing the layout with media queries. In fact, this approach makes more sense to me than starting with a desktop layout and coding for progressively decreasing layouts. For me, this nugget was worth the price of the book.
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