Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $5.53 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Restraint: A New Foundati... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by apex_media
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships direct from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $25. Overnight and 2 day shipping available!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Trade in your item
Get a $4.75
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) Hardcover – June 24, 2014

ISBN-13: 978-0801452581 ISBN-10: 0801452589 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $24.42
36 New from $19.00 13 Used from $17.83
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$24.42
$19.00 $17.83
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) + What Good Is Grand Strategy?: Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush
Price for both: $50.11

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Cornell Studies in Security Affairs
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (June 24, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801452589
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801452581
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,431 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Restraint makes an eloquent case for a new grand strategy. It is not a newcase, for it echoes the arguments offshore balancers have been making for twenty years. It does, however, codify much good thought and consistently makes judicious judgments with precision and fairness. Critics of the status quo would do well to incorporate Posen's case into public discourse." —Jared McKinney,The American Spectator(June 2014)



"The three most consequential books of international relations theory published at the end of the Cold War are Frances Fukuyama's The End of History, Samuel Huntington’s The Clash of Civilizations, and John Mearsheimer’s The Tragedy of Great Power Politics…Thankfully, there has now emerged a stunning new contender: MIT Professor Barry Posen’sRestraint: The New Foundation of American Grand Strategy. The good news is—if employed–Posen’s prescriptive will enhance U.S. security and a large measure of its post-Cold War global primacy within realistic limits and at a lower cost." —Donald L. Sassano,In Homeland Security(July 2014)



"Barry R. Posen is one of America's leading thinkers about grand strategy. He has given us some of the best scholarly analysis of how states use military means to meet foreign policy objectives and cogently described the various strategies America has considered over the years. Now he is wading into the policy debate by planting his intellectual flag on behalf of a new U.S. grand strategy of restraint. In a sharply argued and comprehensive book, Posen shows why the grand strategy of primacy, which has guided America's military strategy for the past twenty years, is no longer economically sustainable nor militarily necessary. He convincingly argues that restraint will provide a sounder basis for ensuring U.S. national security in the years to come."—Michael C. Desch, University of Notre Dame, author of Power and Military Effectiveness: The Fallacy of Democratic Triumphalism

About the Author

Barry R. Posen is Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Security Studies Program at MIT. He is the author of The Sources of Military Doctrine: France, Britain, and Germany between the World Wars (winner of the Furniss Award and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award), Inadvertent Escalation: Conventional War and Nuclear Risks, and Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy, all from Cornell.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Second, Posen argues that the U.S. must adopt a grand strategy that it can actually afford.
Donald Sassano
Written in spare and lucid prose, this book is an essential read for US foreign policy practitioners as well as wider audiences interested in public policy.
J. Lind
The book assumes – it has to assume as a baseline – that the United States loses its relative financial power only gradually.
Graham H. Seibert

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The thesis of this book is that the United States is overstretched. The country is spending more than they can afford on defense. We are currently protecting countries which would be better off protecting themselves. We could defend our national interests with less of an outlay. In fact, reducing our presence elsewhere in the world would reduce the level of antagonism against America.

Posen's focus is on conventional military power and conventional strategy and tactics – warfare between states. His assumption is that the tools and tactics of the existing military will be appropriate to combat the threats he sees, but it is a question of balance.

Posen would like to see more military strength focused on "the commons," the oceans, skies, space and the communications sphere, and less on land-based armies. The United States' greatest assets are its geographic location, isolated, with access to two oceans, and its technology. It should exploit those.

This book anticipates non-state aggression such as that we are observing today (June 2014) in Iraq. While he proposes countermeasures, he does not anticipate that this will be the major form of threat to be countered.

More significant, Posen did not anticipate the ‘hybrid war' being waged in Ukraine. What is special about it is that the new technologies are being used simultaneously, combining hard and soft power.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on June 28, 2014
Format: Hardcover
The U.S. has become incapable of moderating its ambitions in international politics; our foreign policy has become counterproductive and costly, supported by both Democrats and Republicans. Posner's objective in this book is to explain why this is so, and to offer an alternative - 'restraint.'

Posner 'credits' three events as driving his thinking:

1)Expanding NATO to include former portions of the U.S.S.R. - added little to U.S. security, while antagonizing Russia
2)The war in Kosovo - rationalized on the basis of poor information and mischaracterization of information motivated by policy entrepreneurs
3)The 2003 Iraq war - the preceding, on steroids.

Restraint would allow us to first look at the security advantages of the U.S. that make it relatively easy to defend. Unfortunately, the collapse of Soviet power left the U.S. as the most relatively capable global power in history, 'vindicated' the righteousness of our system and made it a model (in our eyes) for others, and the bureaucracies we'd built up did not want to go out of business. Sept. 11 then supercharged our resolve to become more involved, seemingly everywhere.

These actions, combined with decades of excessive military spending and foreign entanglements, were all driven by a desire to preserve America's (dwindling) power advantage in the pursuit of democratic governance for all nations, individual rights for all, free markets, freedom of the press, and the rule of law.

The latter set of values are believed to create a safer world for America. Threats, on the other hand, are seen as emanating from failed states (eg. Afghanistan - terrorism, human rights abuses), rogue states (North Korea, Iran) are seen as potential possessors of nuclear weapons, and peer competitors (eg.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Donald Sassano on July 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Arguably, the three most consequential books of international relations theory published at the end of the Cold War were Frances Fukuyama's The End of History, Samuel Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, and John Mearsheimer's The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. Crudely encapsulated, Endism, Clashism, and Offensive Realism waxed and waned since the world we knew turned upside down after the collapse of the Soviet Union. With China’s rise, Mearsheimer seems to have gained top position, at least for the moment. But none of the above have been fully satisfying, or for that matter fully predictive.

Thankfully, there has emerged a stunning new contender: MIT professor Barry Posen's Restraint: The New Foundation of American Grand Strategy. The good news is if employed Posen’s prescriptives will enhance U.S. security and a large measure of its post-Cold War global primacy within realistic limits, and at a lower cost. The bad news is his ideas are likely to be willfully misconstrued (by neoconservatives) or studiously ignored (by liberal interventionists).

Posen begins with two commonsense notions. First, strenuous attempts to employ a grand strategy of “Liberal Hegemony” since the end of the Cold War have failed, principally due to its discounting of “the enduring power of nationalism and the inclination of self-aware peoples to resist direction by outsiders.” Excepting the narrowly defined mission to trap and destroy Al Qaeda in Afghanistan after 9/11, the outsized ambition that galvanized subsequent U.S. policy called for standing up liberal societies within illiberal, underdeveloped venues. The Bush administration bet the house that follow-on transformations after illusory success in Kabul would ensue (bandwagoning) – a sort of reverse domino effect. Tragically, the U.S.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?