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Restricting Handguns: The Liberal Skeptics Speak Out Hardcover – February 1, 1979


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 237 pages
  • Publisher: North River Pr (February 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884270335
  • ISBN-13: 978-0884270331
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,892,544 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Floyd R. Harris on October 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
I was first introduced to Kates' book when it came out and was shocked at the frankness of the information. The book contains a number of contibutors - various experts in their field - all of which destoys many of the notions and myths about gun control. I've used the book (and actually I bought a second copy after the first was worn out) as the bible to educate people to the realities Kates brings to light. Kates continues to write and debate his stand and has written other books continuing this theme.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stu Chisholm on February 18, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
About 3 years ago or so, I began research on a book that explains guns, gun rights and the politics surrounding them from an average person's perspective. Funny thing, though, is that once you've published such a thing, the discussions never end! People challenge me, supplement my data and make me aware of those questions I left unanswered. It was during some of those conversations, and some accompanying articles, where this book surfaced. Had I known about it, I would've been irresponsible not to cite it repeatedly. In fact, I'd call it the "sister book" -- the one to read BEFORE reading mine, like a required course in a curriculum in order to take the next level class. What strikes me is how, back in 1979, the very same arguments and fallacies were being touted that we constantly hear today! Yet without the internet, the only guide being raw data, empirical evidence and the sharp reason brought to bear by law enforcement, legal authorities and scholars drew many of the conclusions that I did in 2013. A virtual feast for the "data picker" and hardcore fact freak, and an enlightening read for anyone concerned with "gun violence" and how we might attempt to reduce it while avoiding unintended consequences. I cannot recommend it enough!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dean Weingarten on December 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In the early 1980's, I loaned this book to a Nobel Laureate who had written a letter to the editor pushing for more infringements on the second amendment. I found that he had done no research on the subject, and asked if he would be willing to look at a book about it. He said yes. I delivered the book, and I have to say, I was impressed by him as an academic. You could see the intensity in the man. He was focused, focused like an Olympic athlete. His life was organized around his research, his time was extremely valuable, he spent his life on what he believed to be important.

Two weeks later, I asked for the book back. He said that I could pick it up. I did so, and when I was at his office, I asked him if he had read it. He said that he had skimmed through it. I asked him if he had learned anything. He said "I learned not to write about things that I do not know anything about." I never saw another letter to the editor from him.

The book changed the debate about an armed citizenry. Kates is rather underrated. He is the first that I read that proposed and recruited people to write scholarly articles to law journals to show the support for the second amendment that existed outside the mythology that had been created in "progressive" circles.

While the book is a bit dated now, the arguments are still valid. It is a valuable addition to anyone who wants to understand this issue.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By myself on August 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
I read this book shortly before encountering James D. Wright and Peter Rossi's 1983 "Under the Gun" which was the commercial publication of a study began under the Carter Administration DOJ "Weapons, Crime and Violence in America".

At least for me, these two books marked a sea change in the academic look on guns, gun control, and the beginning of the recognition that there are benefits to guns that must be weighed against the costs in formulating gun policy.

Two things stick out in my mind without me re-reading the book.

One, British firearms researcher Colin Greenwood points out that British gun crime and in particular misuse of handguns was lower before the first major national gun law, the 1920 Firearms Act, and every gun law since then has been accompanied by more gun crime, not less in Britain. When you look at recent British crime stats, the very crime rate that is most likely to be deterred by defensive guns in the home--home invasion robbery or "hot burglary"--is higher in Britain that in the USA.

Two, Kales tells of going to Mississippi as part of the black voter registration campaign in the 1960s. Kates was armed for self-defense; his companion was appalled. Kates had a well-thought-through defensive-only philosophy, but his companion was stridently anti-self-defense and anti-gun. When Kates met the same person later, he had become a radical bomb thrower, but Kates was still a man who prefered non-violence but had a self-defense ethic.

Since a lot of gun control politics is still stuck in the 1960s, this 1979 book is a valid source for understanding the issues of today.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James L. Sellers on April 8, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written for an earlier attack on the citizens right to own a handgun in the 80's. Still relevant for today's attacks on firearms.
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