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Resume With Monsters Paperback – March, 2000


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Paperback, March, 2000
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Permanent Pr Pub Co (March 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579620264
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579620264
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,841,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A dark-humored employee-angst novel, seasoned liberally with the Cthulhu Mythos. Spencer has a wonderful antic wit -- he reminds me of Thomas Disch, as in The Businessman. His hapless hero bounces from one dead-end job (Ralph's One-Day Resumes) to another (corporate giants with names like MicroMeg and Pelidyne), but he can't seem to get away from those monsters. Great scenes in which Xerox machines and fax machines and the industrial sprinklers they install overhead in offices interact with Lovecraft's Elder Gods. Lightweight, as horror novels go, but unusually good fun. Winner of the 1995 International Horror Critics Guild Award for Best Novel. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Word processor Philip Kenan is not just stuck in a series of dead-end jobs in this satirical novel, but trapped in delusional fantasies about undead co-workers and monsters from the horror stories of H.P. Lovecraft as well. An unsuccessful novelist himself, Philip possesses an imagination that creeps out of the shadows and sucks up quotidian reality like a B-movie alien, a quality appreciated by neither his ex-girlfriend nor his semiretired therapist, much less by conventional employers. As Philip struggles with temping, therapy and a new love affair, his sanity gradually crumbles to reveal a far more bizarre universe than that in his unpublishable manuscript. Spencer's goofy conceit of an office-life horror novel spoof is kept afloat by a cast of eccentric co-workers at Ralph's One-Day Resumes and the Pelidyne Corporation, easy cracks about data entry and some ingenious narrative tricks (a flashback related as an out-of-body experience, for example). Although this oddball work is often appealing, Spencer (The Return of Count Electric) ultimately fails to unite satisfactorily the workplace comedy and Philip's deranged imagination.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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In its own nutty way, this is a very important book.
Elizabeth A. Stack
If your lucky enough to stumble accross one of his books, grab it up quickly and begin the reading feast.
james m. hall
The result is a book loaded with hilarious dialogue, humorous scenes, and a good deal of light horror.
Jeffrey Leach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on March 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
H.P. Lovecraft always intended his Cthulu mythos to live through other authors' pens. If Lovecraft were alive today he would certainly find William Spencer Browning's treatment most entertaining. In "Resume with Monsters," Browning artfully welds together the infinite horrors of Lovecraft's Old Ones with the modern banalities of life in the corporate world. The result is a book loaded with hilarious dialogue, humorous scenes, and a good deal of light horror.
Philip has a big problem. He sees monsters at work, behind every filing cabinet, around every corner, in the eyes of his fellow co-workers, and in motivational pamphlets handed out in his paycheck envelope. In order to maintain his slipping sanity, Philip spends his free time constantly rewriting his sprawling 2000 page book called "The Despicable Quest," a Lovecraftian tome full of references to Azathoth, Yog-Sathoth, and other unpleasant beings from beyond space and time. Philip is aware that spouting off about monsters from dimensions beyond our own tends to alarm people, which brings in Lily, an aging psychologist who promises Philip she can help him through his troubles.
Philip probably would not have many problems with his demons if he gave up trying to save his ex-girlfriend Amelia. Philip's relentless quest to expose the monsters coupled with the undying devotion to his book infuriated Amelia, spurring a rancorous split. When she moves to Texas Philip follows her, desperate to convince Amelia that he once saved her from eternal doom when the two worked at MicroMeg, a giant international corporation (the details of which can be found in the section of the book hilariously entitled, "The Doom that Came to MicroMeg). Philip drifts from one low paying job to another, always on the lookout for the reemergence of the evil ones.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By james m. hall on February 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
William Browning Spencer is one of names I constantly look for at bookstores. If your lucky enough to stumble accross one of his books, grab it up quickly and begin the reading feast. With RESUME WITH MONSTERS, you will find yourself swept away in a fantasticly clever story. Its such a good read you will have it done in one or two nights. He writes the type of books where you think "Oh I'll read just a few pages before bed", and you end up reading till 4a.m. I strongly recommend all of his books.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth A. Stack on April 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
This achingly funny book introduces the idea that America's corporations are actually run by H.P. Lovecraft monsters...it makes perfect sense to me. The author's view of corporate culture is dead-on accurate, and behind the laughs, there is real anger at the utter dehumanization of the contemporary workplace, and at the weakness of American workers who have allowed themselves to be turned into corporate fodder. In its own nutty way, this is a very important book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
This wry satire is definately worth a read. Throughout the story you're strung along a surreal journey that has you wondering if the main character is insane or enlightened, and keeps you laughing all the delightful way to an astonishing and funny conclusion. If you haven't, reading Lovecraft and becoming familiar with the Cthulhu mythos will enhance this book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By sethteroth@hotmail.com on September 26, 1997
Format: Paperback
Anyone who has read much of Lovecraft and his "family" of writers (August Derleth, Lin CArter, Henry Kuttner, Robert Bloch, etc.) is very familiar with the formulaic plot of "inherit/discover something, cross-reference with Abbie Hazred's 'Who's Who of Bad-Moods-With-Tentacles', and end by going mad and die gibbering in an asylum or becoming 'liquiescent horror,'" to the point that it becomes very difficult to surprise the reader any more with the denoument. Mr Spencer, though, has taken the familiar concepts and beasties of the vaunted Cthulhu mythos and woven them into an engaging, truly enjoyable tale. And he does an excellant job of utilizing the old mainstays, such as Yog-Sothoth and ghouls among others, in a way that re-introduces them, rather than re-hashes them. He also does quite well in showing interaction between society at large and one who has come to accept the "truth" of the Old Ones. And while the reading is light, even campy at times (especially the epilogue), it is one of the most intriguing mythos tales I have read. It is this type of writing that is going to keep the mythos fresh and alive.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By james m. hall on February 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
William Browning Spencer writes the type of book, that you pick up for some "light reading before you go to bed" and end up reading till 4a.m. Much like its predecessor Zod Wallop it is a very easy read. I found myself dissapointed when I finished because its so hard to find a writer that is so hypnotic so enjoyable. I swear you will read this book in one or two nights. I just wish there were more works by Specer. If your looking for a new author, look no further. Enjoy!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Frazer on July 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
I appreciate the Lovecraft references, being a fan, but "Resume with Monsters" transcends the usual Ia! Ia! pastiche...Spencer's use of the Lovecraft mythology, and the humor is fine (if occasionally forced). But what drew me in was the sadness, the poignance, the sense of yearning and loss. The writing veers from silly to suspenseful to flat-out lovely; Philip's recollection of his wedding and married life is especially heartbreaking, for reasons wholly unrelated to Cthulhu or Azathoth. (You could, in fact, argue that all of the monsters are in the narrator's mind, which is a common thread through Spencer's fiction.) I have recommended it to several non-Lovecraft fans, and their uniform response has been, Wow, what else has he written?
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