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The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations) Paperback – January 13, 2005

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Here undoubtedly is a book that is both helpful and insightful for those of us who feel there has got to be a better way to promote global security and global welfare,"
--from the foreword by Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, Nobel
Peace Laureate

"Scott Thomas' work should be read not only by scholars interested in international relations and development, but also by leaders in civil society - in the NGO's, in the corporations, and in the churches. We neglect religious factors in contemporary history to our great peril. One may quibble with his treatment of certain theorists of "modernity," but he sees key global trends clearly, and argues artfully for policies could correct today's intellectual and moral blinders."
--Max L. Stackhouse, Rimmer and Ruth DeVries Professor of Theology and Public Life, Princeton Theological Seminary, Author/editor of the series, God and Globalization

"Post Cold War and post 9/11 politics have witnessed the global resurgence of religion, nationalism and ethnic identity and underscored the failure of international relations theory to anticipate and adequately address the role of religion and culture. Scott Thomas' The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations is a powerful corrective, demonstrating how and why religion and culture are significant forces world politics that have transformed our understanding of IR theory."
--John L. Esposito, University Professor, Georgetown University and author of Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam

"The Global Resurgence of Religion is a vital topic on which mainstream international relations research has been oddly silent. In clear and measured prose Scott Thomas explicates the reason for our intellectual failures and develops an original, eclectic perspective that gives new relevance to the constructivist turn in international relations theory. More importantly, Thomas succeeds in illustrating empirically how and why religion matters in world politics. For those interested in regaining their voice on a crucial topic in world politics this book is essential reading."
--Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter Professor, Jr. of International Studies, Cornell University

"To the surprise of most academics and many politicians, religion has become one of the most dynamic forces in 21st century world politics. Scott Thomas's insightful analysis of this phenomenon fills a gaping hole in international relations theory and should help policy-makers and thoughtful citizens alike think more clearly about the ways in which profound religious and moral convictions can help build a measure of order in world affairs."
--George Weigel, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

From the Inside Flap

“Here undoubtedly is a book that is both helpful and insightful for those of us who feel there has got to be a better way to promote global security and global welfare,“
--from the foreword by Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, Nobel
Peace Laureate

“Scott Thomas’ work should be read not only by scholars interested in international relations and development, but also by leaders in civil society - in the NGO’s, in the corporations, and in the churches. We neglect religious factors in contemporary history to our great peril. One may quibble with his treatment of certain theorists of “modernity,“ but he sees key global trends clearly, and argues artfully for policies could correct today’s intellectual and moral blinders.”
--Max L. Stackhouse, Rimmer and Ruth DeVries Professor of Theology and Public Life, Princeton Theological Seminary, Author/editor of the series, God and Globalization

“Post Cold War and post 9/11 politics have witnessed the global resurgence of religion, nationalism and ethnic identity and underscored the failure of international relations theory to anticipate and adequately address the role of religion and culture. Scott Thomas’ The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations is a powerful corrective, demonstrating how and why religion and culture are significant forces world politics that have transformed our understanding of IR theory.”
--John L. Esposito, University Professor, Georgetown University and author of Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam

“The Global Resurgence of Religion is a vital topic on which mainstream international relations research has been oddly silent. In clear and measured prose Scott Thomas explicates the reason for our intellectual failures and develops an original, eclectic perspective that gives new relevance to the constructivist turn in international relations theory. More importantly, Thomas succeeds in illustrating empirically how and why religion matters in world politics. For those interested in regaining their voice on a crucial topic in world politics this book is essential reading.”
--Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter Professor, Jr. of International Studies, Cornell University

“To the surprise of most academics and many politicians, religion has become one of the most dynamic forces in 21st century world politics. Scott Thomas’s insightful analysis of this phenomenon fills a gaping hole in international relations theory and should help policy-makers and thoughtful citizens alike think more clearly about the ways in which profound religious and moral convictions can help build a measure of order in world affairs.”
--George Weigel, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

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Product Details

  • Series: Culture and Religion in International Relations
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (February 5, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403961573
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403961570
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,132,648 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Larry Baker on August 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
"The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations" not only counts the global resurgence of faith to be authentic but also counts it as integral to public life. Instead of buying into a whole-sale rejection of faith, this book suggests that we need to rethink religion on the basis of the empirical evidence presented to us in globalization. This question actually challenges a great deal of liberal theories of religion that would have us believe the faith is something that stops-up the political process rather than promotes it. I think that Thomas's insight into how religion has offered transnational identities to those marginalized peoples of the world is important and begs for more attention. In response to the first review given of this book I would also add that 'faith identities' are far from static, but are living traditions in which people participate and transform. It is not as though faith only transforms politics but politics has also transformed faith--they inform each other. This view would suggest that the influence of faith in global politics might open up new areas of conversation and promote better relationships, relationships that are built on respect for each other's faith/political situation. I highly doubt that this is an unpromising investigation!
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9 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Mr. N. Coombs on February 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
I am going to take a liberty in this review that is only justified in the absense of any other reviews yet posted; I admit, I have not read the book. But - having taken a series of Scott's courses and read many of his articles I am fairly confident that the content will conform to his long standing positions on the issue of religion in IR, which he has been teaching for years.

The first most obvious point is that Scott believes that the 'global resurgence of religion' is not merely a postmodern political phenomena in the wake of dwindling Third World nationalism and ruthless right wing american politiking, but a genuine revival in faith across the theological spectrum. Epistemological issues aside, and this contention particularly raises many, what are the ethical implications of a subjective as well as objective political manifestation of belief? Scott seeks guidance and puts faith, quite literally in faith, to guide us out of war and conflict in the twenty first century.

The idea, however, of intercultural faith based discourse is on shaky ground. Like Huntington he shares essentialised notions of national and religious cultures, that are temporally static and proceed from a starting point of mutual exclusivity. Using eisenstadt's notion of multiple modernities he clarifies how this process can lead to multiply differentiated modern states conforming to different standards around various religious practices. The ontological question of modernity's relationship to faith is never raised and subsumed by the rhetorical gesture of 'multiple modernities' that seeks to locate modernity merely in the institutional apparatus of technology, commerce and consumerism and not within the life-world of the individual.
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The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations)
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