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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting scenario
Let's start with the basics: Buy it. Read it. It is a very good story. Here is the why:
In general, what separates the great stories from the avarage ones? Some might say that its the ability of some part of the story to remain with you long after you have finished reading it. In this respect, "Ressurection Day" deserves to be classified as a classic of...
Published on September 8, 2003 by Mr. O. Farhi

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92 of 115 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good novel; weak background
One thing that ticks me off about after-the-bomb books is weak research on the effects of nuclear weapons, or on operational plans and capacities. This book suffers from that fault, despite good writing and a nice plot.
Apparently the "Cuban War" of 1962 results in the US getting hit by something on the order of 10-12 Soviet nukes. This is reasonable, if...
Published on December 16, 2000 by S. M Stirling


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding and frightening, December 9, 2002
By A Customer
I'm an avid reader of thrillers and mysteries but rarely opt for those set in history, or, in this case, alternative history. I happened to grab it off our shared bookshelf at work when I had nothing else to read one day at lunch. I could hardly put it down. I was mesmerized by the imagined post-nuclear world that Dubois describes. It's a book I might have found fantastical prior to this last year post Sept. 11. But having watched our government seize more and more control, I think the portrait the author paints is extremely believable and truly terrifying. The story line was entertaining, but I was far more interested in the descriptions of everyday life, the thoughts of survivors, the crush of civil liberties and all else that would (inevitably?) follow in the months and years after nuclear war. I intend to buy this book for some of my good friends and highly recommend it to others. I hope the publisher decides to re-issue it. It was published in 1999, but that's another world ago since Sept. 11, 2001, and I think there'd be a huge market for it given the right promotional campaign. It would also be one heck of a movie.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good Airplane Read, but not as shattering as expected, November 28, 2000
"Resurrection Day" kept me interested throughout, but I must admit that it's depiction of America in 1972 post WW III didn't ring quite true to me. If you're an alternate history fan, or interested in the Cuban Missle Crisis, then this is a worthy read, but that's not to say that it was ~completely~ satisfying (but then few books are).

Although "devastated America" kept being alluded to, it never quite came to life for me. Carl's daily life seems fairly ordinary, and affected only in small ways. This might indeed have been the case if the war happened in '62, since the world wasn't as wired and thus as fragile at that time, but even so, I expected more ~"Alternativeness"~ in his world than I found.

For those that might feel similarly, I recommend the book "Warday", which was published back in about 83-84. "Postman" by David Brin, a great book and not-so-great movie also explores the same genre in a surprisingly effective (and affecting) way.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Camelot in ruins?, December 21, 2000
By 
J. Surowiecki (Hanover Park, Illinois) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Perhaps "Resurrection Day" by Brendan Dubois would have been a more intriguing read had the story taken place directly after the missiles started falling on America and Russia; rather than ten years after the fact. The story itself is fairly crafted, but there's very little actual thrill to any of it.
The greatest nation on the face on the planet reduced to less than second world status? Highly improbable. The strategic retaliations that Mr. Dubois proposes are somewhat far fetched. I would think that the entire European community would have been brought into the war in 1962 had the events unfolded as the story would have you believe.
Carl Landry is a so-so protagonist. He has mixed emotions over both aspects of his life. Which is he truly? A former army sergeant or a Boston newspaper reporter? Mr. Landry himself doesn't seem to know. He can't have it both ways. Several times throughout the novel he detests the work he's done for his country, and equally loathes being called a "quota baby". It's either one or the other, Mr. Landry.
Hot zones, relief-aid from Great Britain, decon camps, poor electricity and food shortages. All are very possible, but a decade after the war? Yet more improbabilities. America's farmland was providing for quite a bit of the world and then some at that time. So, why wouldn't they have done so for their own countrymen? According to Mr. Dubois, none of the Midwest states were even touched. It's details like this that made portions of the story tepid.
The supporting cast is lightweight and all too common in these sorts of novels. Suspicious editors and co-workers, homeless veterans with more knowledge of what actually happened during the war than most citizens, and British consulate workers and military-types with nefarious plans all their own.
As far as "what-if" novels go, it's not too bad. Some of the inner-storylines could have been re-worked or removed altogether. It's a very light read for those people interested in a filler novel before your next big read.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This time, cooler heads didn't prevail, August 9, 2000
This review is from: Resurrection Day (Hardcover)
Alternate history enthusiasts familiar with "Fatherland" will be delighted to get their hands on this romp through the post-World War III United States, devastated emotionally to a much greater degree than physically. For those who like fast, easy reads, a warning: you will have to slosh through some more or less tedious preliminary scenes that are nevertheless essential for the overall plot setup before you get to the fast-paced, page-turning stuff in the second part of the story. Personally, however, I've enjoyed the "preliminaries" as much, if not more, than the thrilling unwinding of the plot and a breathtaking, head-spinning ending. A very old adage came into my head reading about media censorship, peaceful demonstrations broken up violently and without provocation, work camps, orphan street gangs, and more: In conquering, we become the conquered. In the world where the largest communist power is covered with radioactive sludge, its worst traits - civil rights and freedoms infringement - are continued by those who seemingly fought to eliminate them. It is very appropriate that the main protagonist of the book is a reporter - defender of the First Amendment, representative of the most cherished freedom in America, which is the freedom of speech and expression. Despite an optimistic ending, "Resurrection Day" once again stresses the point that there can be no winners in the nuclear war, even if the survivors remain.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and entertaining thriller for AH-addicts, February 17, 2001
By 
Ian Fowler (Denver, CO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Having just read "Resurrection Day", I thought i'd share briefly my opinions, which are mostly favorable. On the whole it makes for an entertaining book, using a a cross-pollenation of genres and sub-genres, beginning as murder myster set in an America 10 years after the Cubam Missle Crisis became a nuclear Cuban War, which crippled the US and annhilated the USSR. It then procedes to turn into a political thriller, as our hero, Boston Globe reporter Carl Landry, delved deeper into the murdered vet and finds all manner of intrigue and danger involving the US and UK governments, military personel, and the truth about what happened in 1962. Elements of post-apocalypse sc-fi also are present in visits to a bombed Manahattan populated by gangs and people fighting for survival. And there is even the dystopic element, represented by a US under ten years of marshal law.
Carl Landry makes for an interesting and mostly sympathetic hero, and the world Brendan DuBois has created is on the whole plausible. Certainly, it does become predictable about page 300; I had pretty well figured out the whole murder mystery by then. And there is a certain whistful nostalgia about the nobility of JFK, and a very cynical view of Curits LeMay (renamed here as Ramsey Curtis) which seem a little simplistic, but it makes for overall an entertaining yarn, particularly for AH-addicts who might need a quick fix.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the better alternate history books, March 13, 2001
By 
Jamie Jamison (Burien, Washington United States) - See all my reviews
What would America be like if the Cuban Missile Crisis had heated up? Brendan DuBois asks this question in Resurrection Day and the answers are frightening. The protagonist is Carl Landry, an Army vet who now works as a reporter for the Boston Globe. Like many other people in this post apocalyptic America Landry just goes through the motions of living, marching on as his life descends into a grey twilight in an American police state. It is only after a military censor spikes one of his stories, a seemingly innocuous one about the murder of a fellow veteran, that Landry begins to ask questions. Who was Merl Sawson? What was the significance of the list of names that he gave Landry in an earlier meeting and why is the military so concerned with his death? Landry begins to ask these questions and the answers lead him to bombed out Manhattan, the remains of Hyannisport, destroyed by anti-Kennedy mobs and into a liaason with a reporter from the London Times who is not all that she seems.
All in all this is an excellent book, more plausible than Robert Harris's Fatherland as this really could have happened and almost did.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Great Idea..., January 19, 2000
This review is from: Resurrection Day (Hardcover)
Like all good creative ideas it leaves one wondering 'why didn't I think of that ?' Unfortunately the book that's hung around the idea is no more than a mildly entertaining potboiler that parallels the spirit of 'Fatherland' (a far better book) perhaps a little too closely. I'm sure it will capture the popular imagination on both sides of the Atlantic, but sadly for me, to my mind a lot of the plot premises don't hang together or aren't explained. Europe is untouched by the war, yet what of the SAC bases in the UK, France & Germany at the time. The dual key Thor missiles in the UK ? The Jupiter missiles in Turkey. With the Nukes flying the USSR would not have ignored them. We were in reach of their medium range missiles don't forget.
As has been discussed, the US would not be as politically and economically damaged by the loss of 5 large conurbations, 10 million souls and a handful (never quantified) of military bases, terrible as that would have been. Transpose that damage to a country the size of the UK and you may have a situation comparable to that described for the US in the book. For a continental Superpower with a highly developed infastructure you would have to multiply the damage by at least a factor of 10.
Another thing never quite explained is how, in a world where the empire is still unravelling (Idi Amin in Uganda gets a mention) Britain has managed to get itself in a position of such economic and military strength that it can not only provide a huge relief effort to the US but also threaten it militarily (while still buying C-130 transport planes from it), especially under a Ted Heath government - he would have been too busy trying to join the Franco-German alliance !
There are other things; the US abandonment of the Pacific (how does Britain hang onto Hong Kong ?), or the angst that British troops feel at the prospect of wresting the last Nukes in the world from the grip of General Curtis (why ! ), but lastly, I afraid I have to say the British characters are absurd caricatures. Joan Collins and Stephanie Beecham were obviously wasting their talents in all those episodes of Dynasty. Have you people learnt nothing from Hugh Grant & Austin Powers ?
Seriously, for those of you intrigued by the question, 'What-If ?' you can't do better than to read Harry Turtledoves 'Great War - American Front' series. Starting with 'How Few Remain'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Incredible--kept me up nights!, August 12, 2002
By 
Tim Edmonson (Pittsburgh, PA) - See all my reviews
One of the best alternate history books I've ever read, quite frankly. It sits up on my shelf up next to "Fatherland". While there may have been a few weak points (the motivation behind the US Government inviting British troops in to do its own dirty work
really was not expressed that strongly, or convincingly) the world DuBois paints is strong enough to sweep you along with the narrative, so weak points are easily forgiven and accepted.
Perhaps if I had read this book pre-9/11 I would not have been struck quite so strongly by it: but as is, reading it now as our own government considers having its own citizens inform on each other, and fearful of civil liberties being trampled in the name of security...it chills the blood, to see in fiction, where such actions could lead. Highly reccommended, this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Disappear Into A Fascinating Read!, November 25, 2000
So you've never been attracted to historical fiction. Me neither. But don't miss this fabulously entertaining read!
If you want to disappear into a story and get totally immersed in another world, you'll love this book. While the story works well as a thriller, it is so unlike anything else out there, you'll find it as refreshing as fascinating.
The alternate history is told so plausibly, you will get caught up in the post-nuclear world that has relegated America to third rate status. As a result, you'll find yourself putting the book down, looking around and truly appreciating the freedom and wealth we enjoy in America, as well as recognizing the fragility of our largesse.
For quality escapist reading, I highly recommend "Resurrection Day." Now duck and cover!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Adequate Story Dwarfed by Unfulfilled Potential, March 28, 2001
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I found it ironic that this book dealt with a scenario which "might have been", because that was exactly my feeling when I finished the book. While I didn't detest Resurrection Day, I was left disappointed that the book's potential that was never realized.
This unfulfilled feeling extended to all parts of the book. The characters, while adequate, were never developed to the point of being memorable. The dialogue, while not entirely detracting from the book, also didn't give the reader anything worth remembering. Finally, the narrative itself suffered from that most dreaded of maladies: the tidy ending. For instance, the "Resurrection Day" of the story got a great deal of buildup, but then was barely mentioned at the end. I had imagined a lot of possibilities for that aspect of the story. Instead, it got just a few sentences in the last chapter. Other facets of the story suffered a similar fate. A more thorough development of the narrative would have resulted in a more memorable book.
Some of the hype would have one believe that Resurrection Day is as good as Fatherland by Robert Harris. I'd actually put it on a level with Harris' Archangel. Both are stories that have great premises, but are not developed to a level that sufficiently explores those premises. As with Archangel, Resurrection Day is not a bad book. However, the promise does not equal the actual product. Consequently, the result is a book that is instantly forgettable after one finishes it.
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Resurrection Day
Resurrection Day by Brendan DuBois (Hardcover - May 31, 1999)
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