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Resurrection Row Mass Market Paperback – May 12, 1986

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This 1981 mystery, the fourth in the long-running series featuring Inspector Thomas Pitt and his well-born wife, Charlotte, is one of the best for its balance between the mystery itself and Perry's scathing portrait of Victorian society. It is bad enough that the recently deceased Lord Fitzroy-Hammond has been removed from his grave, but when it happens a second time and then other buried corpses start popping up, the normally unflappable Pitt is puzzled indeed. Is the perpetrator trying to hide a murder or call attention to one? The answer lies in a convoluted but perfectly logical merging of art, blackmail, politics, pornography, and prostitution. Perry (Paragon Walk) delights in showing how much of London, except for a handful of influential citizens, chose to ignore the shameful poverty surrounding them. This provocative tale, extremely well read by Davina Porter, is highly recommended for popular collections. Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Few mystery writers this side of Arthur Conan Doyle can evoke Victorian London with such relish for detail and mood.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“Anne Perry has made the Victorian era her own literary preserve. . . . Perry’s work is consistently top-notch.”—San Diego Union

“Perry is my choice for today’s best mystery writer of Victoriana.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“When Anne Perry puts Thomas and Charlotte Pitt on the case, we are in exemplary Victorian company.”—New York Times



From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Fawcett (May 12, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449210677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449210673
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,296,618 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Anne Perry is the bestselling author of two acclaimed series set in Victorian England: the William Monk novels, including Dark Assassin and The Shifting Tide, and the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novels, including The Cater Street Hangman, Calandar Square, Buckingham Palace Gardens and Long Spoon Lane. She is also the author of the World War I novels No Graves As Yet, Shoulder the Sky, Angels in the Gloom, At Some Disputed Barricade, and We Shall Not Sleep, as well as six holiday novels, most recently A Christmas Grace. Anne Perry lives in Scotland.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By MLPlayfair on February 11, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
RESURRECTION ROW is the fourth in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series that begins with "The Cater Street Hangman." Once again, Perry creates a fairly strong sense of place with very few details. She uses interesting twists and turns and colorful characters, and once again there's a certain amount of -- let's call it "unpleasantness." Her books aren't pretty. This time we get more insight into Thomas's character, because Charlotte isn't involved as much in this one. And, as with Perry's others, we get a good look at all levels of the class system in place in London at the time. The plot is fascinating and the conclusion is very satisfying.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 10, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the fourth novel in the Charlotte and Inspector Thomas Pitt series of high Victorian mysteries, though I've read several others out of order. All of them seem to be a mix of police procedural and social commentary, in which Pitt has to delve into the depths of London's underclass while Charlotte wades through the unpleasantnesses of Society's drawing rooms. Sometimes the latter is better written and more interesting than the former, but in this case the mystery is interesting and also funny in an oddball way. The recently buried keep turning up out of their coffins -- sitting in hansom cabs, or in church pews, or leaning against their own tombstones. All were apparently natural deaths, so Thomas isn't even quite sure for much of the book whether any serious crime actually has been committed. Meanwhile, Mr. Carlisle, an avid and politically astute social reformer, is making converts to his cause of reforming the workhouses by dragooning his social acquaintances into visiting the slums and rookeries. Charlotte (who married down) is a likeable enough character, and her sister, Lady Ashworth (who married up), is well done, but Thomas himself seems to emote too much. Aunt Vespasia, on the other hand, is a marvelous depiction of a grand and starchy old lady who's smarter and more socially aware than most of her contemporaries. Although Perry repeats her bad habit of nearly blowing off the solution to the mystery in favor of sociological commentary, this is a pretty good read.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 6, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Exceptional. All of the Pitt series is good, but this may be one of the best. As an avid reader of mysteries, I found it wonderfully frustrating to get into the last chapter without actually knowing who the killer was. Better, Perry did it without cheating. Once you get to the solution, you realize that ever clue you needed was right there all along, and each false trail was masterfully done.
My only complaint in this book is that Perry padded large sections with irrelevant musings, and several were actually out of character for the person musing. There is a section with Thomas mulling all of the dead ends in a dispassionate mental voice that is completely different than in any other part of the series, and another with Charlotte using the same cadence, rehashing discarded leads. It feels as if her publisher came back and demanded about twenty more pages, and she scrambled to cram them into an otherwise tight and well-crafted book.
On the other hand, her mastery of the period is incomparable, tossing the assumptions and mundane details of the day into the story in a way that draws you fully into a remarkable and fascinating point in history. The characters are perfect and well-realized, as always, and this book introduces one of my favourite bit players--Aunt Vespasia, the Lady Cumming-Gould. Delightful, insightful, intriguing and unconventional, just like this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By jrc on January 31, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Anne Perry can write some pretty decent mysteries but this isn't one. At the denoument of the best Agatha Christie mysteries, with a gasp of epiphany we suddenly see all the pieces fall into place - the psychological clues we had dismissed, the ironies we underestimated, the character interrelationships that had been only hinted at - and it all makes sense; we are embarassed when we realize the solution was unique. In Resurrection Row, the disinterment of the bodies is a very brilliant and daring introduction to the mystery, but the relationship to the murder could have been much more cogent and psychologically compelling (vengeful intent to embarass,religious zeal, etc), rather than almost an afterthought. Moreover, the rationale for the disinterments was flimsy and the murder could have been concealed much more easily and intelligently other than by this particular conceit.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the fourth in the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt series and is well up to Anne Perry's usual high standard! This one has a particularly ingenious plot and I was delighted to see that the interesting and mildly eccentric Aunt Vespasia is back again. She figured in the previous book, Paragon Walk. Charlotte's brother-in-law, Dominic, figures prominently in this book also.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Lesley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 4, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I am reading all the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mysteries written by Anne Perry in order. It has been quite a while since I read book number three in the series. The books don't have to be read in order to enjoy them but there does seem to be a progression in the growth and depth of the two main characters which is best noted if you start at the beginning and read them cronologically. If nothing else, try to read the first book(The Cater Street Hangman) before venturing off into others of the series. Book number one sets up the relationship between Charlotte and Thomas and gives you the social background so very necessary to understand their characters.

This was my least favorite of the four books I've read. Anne Perry makes a point of presenting her stories by crossing over into all levels of Victorian London. This one concentrates on the inequities between those of the upper class and those who are the very poorest of the poor. We are given a thorough understanding of the sweatshops and workhouses which existed and how they impacted the lives of those who were forced to live in them. This book is 216 pages long. The discovering of the murder took place on page 141. That was much too long for me. I became disenchanted with the whole thing long before that. In this book, for me, the mystery took a back seat to the discussion of social conditions for the poor in Victorian London. I expect some social commentary from Anne Perry, that is one of the things I like so much about her books. This time, that is what took center stage.

When the book first began I had nothing but admiration for this authors creativity in having the "death" of the driver of the hansom cab turn into a riddle with no apparent solution.
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