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Resurrection: The Struggle for a New Russia Paperback – May 26, 1998


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Resurrection: The Struggle for a New Russia + Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (May 26, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375750231
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375750236
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #287,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In his first account of Russia, Lenin's Tomb, David Remnick wrote a history paced like a thriller that recast the common understanding of the last days of the Soviet Empire. While most reporters mouthed the standard lines about the "fall of communism," Remnick delivered a gripping account of how the old order in which gangsters ruled through brutal state power lost its hold on the Russian people. Remnick's stunning reportage cut away the myths of the Soviet system to provide the first account of how Eastern Europeans and former citizens of the Soviet Union had long viewed the Soviet regime. The book won the young author his first Pulitzer Prize.

In his new and equally superb book Resurrection, Remnick offers clear-eyed commentary on how the old order of gangsters has given way to a new order. Russia's power elite, he tells us, has embraced the tools and techniques of markets and electioneering to maintain power, while organized crime is fast becoming a major force in the economy. Remnick also describes how the changes in Russia have effected the people themselves. Heart-wrenching chapters on the war in Chechnya, the health and welfare of children (only 15 percent of school children are classified as healthy, and 50 percent are unfit for military service), and the diminished state of Russian letters and literature chronicle the suffering of a once proud nation as it attempts to rebuild itself. Resurrection makes good on Remnick's name and reputation as the best American writer on Russia today. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In this follow-up to Lenin's Tomb (LJ 6/15/93), which focused on the collapse of the USSR, Remnick concentrates on the post-Soviet scene and its prospects. We meet a rich variety of personalities, some familiar?like Alexander Solzhenitsyn and "retired czar" Mikhail Gorbachev? and some largely unknown?like Vladimir Gusinsky, the most powerful member of the new emerging Muscovite elite. Boris Yeltsin figures crucially in Remnick's narrative, which paints vignettes about the "new Russia." Chaotic uncertainty, massive corruption, and crime are notoriously present, yet the possibility of a different, better life also beckons. The past is not encouraging, but Remnick ends on a tentatively hopeful note. This is an interesting, highly informative portrait of a country struggling toward a fateful future. Strongly recommended.
-?Robert H. Johnston, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

David Remnick was a reporter for The Washington Post for ten years, including four in Moscow. He joined The New Yorker in 1992 and has been the magazine's editor since 1998. His book King of the World, a biography of Ali, was picked by Time Magazine as the top nonfiction book of 1998. Lenin's Tomb received the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1994.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Each conclusion or statement is backed up in the writing.
John G. Hilliard
I recommend this book to anyone who wants to know more about the characters who shaped the post-Soviet Russia, and about the character of Russia itself.
unraveler
The book is the sequel to Lenin's Tomb, Remnick's superbly written Pulitzer Prize winning account of the fall of the Soviet Union.
Paul Romita (evolk@earthlink.net)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By John G. Hilliard on April 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book bills itself as a history of the past 10 years after the fall of the Soviet Empire, and it does just that. There is no denying that the author, David Remnick is the king of current Russian society structure. The book not only focuses on who has power and what hey are doing with it, but it digs deeper down to the Joe everybody and what it is like to live in a country that continues to fall into lower and lower standards of living. As far as who has the power now, that is a mix of old political cronies and new upstart organized crime figures with a few brave capitalists thrown into the mix.
This is a well thought out and constructed book and keeps you interested. Just when you have had a good dose of heavy economic issues we go to the war in Chechnya, which keeps the pace up. He has peppered the book with interesting interviews and massive dose of good old fashion reporting. You can tell he worked very hard on this book, there is nothing left in the air. Each conclusion or statement is backed up in the writing. You also get the true love he has for the country and the people, the emotion comes through the writing and makes the book more then just a historical report. The writing is very good and challenging, this is not a book you can read and watch TV at the same time, you really need to and want to sink your teeth into it. If you are looking to learn something and enjoy it at the same time then this would be a very good buy.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Paul Romita (evolk@earthlink.net) on September 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
With the release of Resurrection: The Struggle for a New Russia, David Remnick further strengthens his reputation as one of America's premier journalists. The book is the sequel to Lenin's Tomb, Remnick's superbly written Pulitzer Prize winning account of the fall of the Soviet Union. Resurrection continues where Lenin's Tomb left off, brilliantly chronicling Russia's painful effort to emerge from under the rubble of a collapsed system and recreate itself.
Remnick lived and worked in Moscow between 1988 and 1991 as a Washington Post correspondent, witnessing and writing about the last days of the Soviet Empire. During his tenure at the Post and in more recent years, Remnick has traveled extensively throughout Russia and the former Soviet Republics, conducting countless interviews with key Russian political figures, businessmen, cultural icons, and ordinary citizens. Fluent in Russian, he possesses an impressive depth and breadth of knowledge of Russian and Soviet history, politics, and culture--tools he effectively employs to enhance the reader's understanding of events and personalities in modern-day Russia. In Resurrection, history, politics, and biography are skillfully woven together to create a beautiful, tightly knit journalistic tapestry.
Not merely content with recounting events, Remnick probes the deeper currents that underlie these events and give them their meaning. His writing is vivid and passionate, and his sharp journalistic instincts and keen understanding of human nature enable him to perceive and analyze crucial details.
Penetrating, insightful, and tragic, his account of the war in Chechnya is Remnick at his best.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jason Morris on October 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Your question is probably "is this book worth buying?" In my opinion, Yes, and here's why; This guy has done his homework. He not only researched those he wrote about; he has actually interviewed many of them personally. He's not much for summarizing or handing everything to you in a package; he presents the facts, the rumors, etc. and the reader is left to draw many of the conclusions - although he certainly helps guide the reader along w/ some issues. The one downside is that he deals primarily with the big city (i.e. Moscow) economic and political side of things; if you are looking for a peek at the day-to-day lives of ordinary Russians, you may be disappointed. This book deals primarily with the movers and shakers, and their lifestyles get the majority of the attention. This book gave me a much clearer picture of the political dynamics of both old and new Russia's government and economy. If you only half-listened to the news reports of political developments in the former USSR during the period of 1989-1998, then you will most likely find some surprises here. There are a lot of things we don't hear about here in America....
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gene Zafrin on March 15, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Compared to "Lenin's Tomb", this book is decidedly less thrilling. For the most part, it is not the author's fault: in "Lenin's Tomb" he got to talk about Lenin, Stalin and Gorbachev, about Sacharov and early Solzhenitsyn, about the Bolshevik coup of 1917 and military/KGB revolt of 1991. Russian history of that period was as rich and colorful as it was bloody and tragic. "Resurrection" is concerned with a much shorter period between 1991 and 1996, and has to deal with Yeltsin, Zhirinovsky, Zyuganov, Russian new rich and new poor, the bleak cultural scene: most subjects in focus dreadfully pathetic. On the other hand, the book itself fails to step up to the base. The numerous portraits of politicians almost completely lack any mention of their program, a surprising choice for a Washington Times correspondent. The fact that the president-parliament confrontation of 1993 was ostensibly provoked by Yeltsin, who unconstitutionally declared the dissolution of parliament, does not merit more than a mention in the book. The common perception of Yeltsin-the-hero-of-'91 is never questioned, even though after his gridlock on Chechnya his ousting of Gorbachev and ascension to Russia's throne looks more like a land grab.
The book's longer chapters betray a slower pace of events. The novelty of the rising curtain was gone and everyone expected the play to begin. The action proved to be underwhelming. 1991: the country is fascinated by Yeltsin, a drinking boor; 1993: a quarter of the country votes for the dimwit Zhirinovsky; 1996: a quarter of the country votes for the dull communist Zyuganov, a xenophobe and anti-Semite who "forgot" about the millions murdered under Stalin, and saw much positive in Stalinism.
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