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Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America (Technology, Education--Connections (Tec)) (Technology, Education-Connections, the Tec Series) 1st Edition

31 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807750025
ISBN-10: 0807750026
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Editorial Reviews

Review

A breakthrough book that goes well beyond the idea of adding technology to existing schools. This will be a must read for my students and research collaborators. --John Bransford, University of Washington, author of How People Learn and Preparing Teachers for a Changing World<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter<br \><br \>The most convincing account I've read about how education will change in the decades ahead the authors' analyses are impressive, fair-minded, and useful. --Howard Gardner, Harvard Graduate School of Education, author of Five Minds for the Future and Frames of Mind<br \><br \>A breakthrough book that goes well beyond the idea of adding technology to existing schools. This will be a must read for my students and research collaborators. --John Bransford, University of Washington, author of How People Learn and Preparing Teachers for a Changing World<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter<br \><br \>''Thoughtful and accessible...brings fresh insight into the question of what the implications of digital technologies are for education.'' --E-Learning and Digital Media<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter<br \><br \>''[The authors] make the case for a technology-based revolution in education that will redefine conceptions of how and where learning occurs.'' --CHOICE Magazine<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter<br \><br \>''A fascinating account of how schools are functioning within a technology driven world, and what can be done to bridge the gap between in-school and out-of-school learning.'' --Journal of Language and Literacy Education<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter<br \><br \>''A fascinating account of how schools are functioning within a technology driven world, and what can be done to bridge the gap between in-school and out-of-school learning.'' --Journal of Language and Literacy Education<br \><br \>If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter

''A fascinating account of how schools are functioning within a technology driven world, and what can be done to bridge the gap between in-school and out-of-school learning.'' --Journal of Language and Literacy Education

If you want to join today s conversation about the future of learning, start here. --Lauren Resnick, University of Pittsburgh, author of Education and Learning to Think and Making America Smarter

About the Author

Allan Collins is professor emeritus of education and social policy at Northwestern University and former co-director of the U.S. Department of Education s Center for Technology in Education. Richard Halverson is an associate professor of educational leadership and policy analysis at the University of Wisconsin Madison, where he is co-founder of the Games, Learning and Society group.

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Product Details

  • Series: Technology, Education-Connections, the Tec Series (Book 9)
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press; 1 edition (September 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807750026
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807750025
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #106,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A. Phonethibsavads on October 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Collins and Halverson raise many legitimate points in this book, but there are also some points of contention that remain unresolved. Although this book proposes few definite answers, it opens up lively discussion for rethinking education in the information age, and it is an essential read for future educators because it outlines very convincingly that schools are following an outdated model and should be reformed. However, the solutions that Collins and Halverson propose will remain points of contention for time to come, and many people will remain skeptical.

This book does an excellent job of outlining the problem in an easy-to-understand way: In short, the school system as we know it was formed during the Industrial Revolution, and it is designed to efficiently transmit information from the teacher to the students in large numbers. It is clear that the Industrial Age is over, and we are now well into the Information Age, and we see youth becoming a lot more involved in exchanging information and knowledge over the web than before. Consequently, we are finding that students are learning much more in these informal environments because they are voluntarily engaging in information which they find interesting, so Collins and Halverson propose that education should become less institutionalized and more personalized.

Essentially, Collins and Halverson propose that technology allows personalized instruction to large numbers of students, and education should look more like home-schooling or apprenticeship, in which students decide the terms and conditions of their learning rather than following a prescribed route. This will promote a higher degree of specialization, and "just-in-case" learning would no longer be relevant.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Foster on October 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Collins and Halverson have provided a timely and realistic perspective on educational technology that gets us past both the exuberant and the despairing views. There certainly is much more that can and should be said about the many topics they discuss, but I think they've successfully located the "core" of the matter, and with welcome brevity.

Being personally experienced in this field, I'd just offer two or three criticisms. The first is their assumption that interactive learning programs will play a large role in the future of education. I imagine that they eventually will, but after at least thirty years of research and experimentation with such environments, I am impressed by how limited their real-world success has been. The commercial successes have been in the teaching of math, but besides that there's still a surprising lack of good, usable programs.

Which leads to a more general comment about the way they characterize the "skeptics'" perspective. The authors stress the institutional obstacles, but I don't ever hear them acknowledge that making all these different ed tech ideas work "at scale" is much, much harder than it looks. We want to lament schools' intransigence, and cultural issues, and misguided policies about standards, and etc... but maybe most of what has been offered to schools is bad and unworkable. It doesn't _seem_ unworkable to most of us, but most of it really has been.

What may have been helpful in this book would have been an attempt, however speculative, at estimating the time frames likely to be involved in the proliferation of these new forms, i.e. learning centers, distance education, interactive simulations, certifications, etc. Are these changes 5 years away? 20? 100?
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Psotka on October 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent, thoughtful book about schooling and the changes in technologies: networks, cell phones, simulations and games; and their effects around the edges of school systems. The authors are a technologist and an educator and together they bring balance and insight into this formidable jungle of interwoven influences and possibilities. It is well worth reading if you too are a thoughtful parent or grandparent and want to prepare yourself and your children for the future. If you are a teacher or educational leader, you must read this book.

They are best at describing succinctly all the changes going on and the virtual absence of response by schools, who are "locked in place". Their short history of schooling in America is a glorious thumbnail of the important events that provides the dominant theme of transition between apprenticeship, didactic learning in the industrial age, and the beginnings of an information age that is in evolution. They think they discern the directions that are important, the changes nibbling at the edge of school systems, and they lay them out clearly under several headings such as home schooling, workplace learning, distance ed, adult ed, learning centers, internet cafes, interactive learning environments, technical certifications, and lifelong learning. Each of these are short and to the point, presenting just the main skeleton to sustain their arguments. Anything more and the reader would be bogged down in complexities.

For me, their main points are old hat. This is a history I have lived and am all too familiar with. I was surprised then to find a set of presecriptions that actually began to make sense of this morass and offered some hope for a real future.
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