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Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent Paperback – July 28, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-1420867428 ISBN-10: 1420867423

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Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent + The Myth of the Chemical Cure: A Critique of Psychiatric Drug Treatment + Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 420 pages
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse (July 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1420867423
  • ISBN-13: 978-1420867428
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #759,891 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Grace Jackson is a board certified psychiatrist who graduated summa cum laude from California Lutheran University with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a Bachelor of Science in Biology, as well as a Masters Degree in Public Administration. She earned her Medical Degree from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in 1996 and completed her internship and residency while in the U. S. Navy. Following her service as a staff psychiatrist at Bethesda Naval Hospital, she worked in the North Carolina prison system. Dr. Jackson has lectured widely in the United States and Europe, and has testified as an expert witness in forced medication trials. Her interests include philosophy, history, politics, and law.

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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This book should be standard equipment for every human being.
Vince Boehm
It is exceptionally well researched and written and does indeed provide a guide for informed consent.
Foucault
Dr. Jackson shows the potential downside of many psychotropic drugs.
James M. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 46 people found the following review helpful By carolyn moody on August 13, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A one-of-a-kind book that does not to presume to say "do or don't". Impeccably researched, it is a must read for anyone interested in the undisclosed facts about many psychiatric medications: namely, how they stress the brain and create life-long patients. Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent is presented succinctly, is easily read and broken down for the layman or professional. Lest the reader lose hope, the book also presents "evidence based" literature which demonstrates the existence of safe and effective alternatives to psychiatric drugs.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Shipko on March 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a brilliant and well referenced book. Dr. Jackson explores the scientific information involving psychiatric medication. Not the usual stuff from the sales oriented psychiatric establishment or from antidrug supplement salespeople. As a psychiatrist, I have read the book three times as the detail and complexity merit repeated readings. This should be a standard text for medical students and psychiatry trainees - psychiatrists should not be recertified for their boards unless they know the information in this splendid book. If you are a patient, looking for information upon which to make an informed decision about a potential drug therapy, 'Rethinking' has what you need. The book describes drugs in general and then goes into detail about specific classes of drugs. Information is both scientifically and technically appropriate for physicians and also readable and informative for the patient. Dr. Jackson has performed a major service to humanity in this book.
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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Medical School Professor on August 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
Very highly recommended. After obtaining data through the Freedom of Information Act from the FDA, Dr. Irving Kirsch did an analysis of the 6 most widely used antidepressant drugs. It found that on average they only have an 18% effect over and above placebo effects. Given the side effects, expense, and withdrawal syndrome, these kinds of findings should cause everyone to reevaluate reliance on medication treatment. There are similar findings with anxiety medications, and shockingly, the average ritalin follow-up study is only 3 weeks long. However, tne multi-billion dollar drug companies have tremendous influence on psychiatry and the FDA. The public must realize that FDA approval for a drug only requires 2 controlled studies showing a statistical significance over a placebo, and there is no limit on how many other studies have been done that found no positive effect. Although medications can certainly play a role in treatment, this book will inform the public and mental health professionals alike on how over-rated medication treatment is.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Foucault on March 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
The very best I have read on the subject of psychiatric drugs...Dr. Jackson does not merely describe the effects of the Rx as with most other text on the subject, but actually provides explainations for the effects. It is exceptionally well researched and written and does indeed provide a guide for informed consent. In fact it provides a very sound critque for NOT consenting to psychiatric drugs...Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs should be compulsory reading for all Health Professionals as part of their CME ( continiung medical education). It is written ineasy to understand language without the extreme academic medical jargon incomprehensible to the layman. It is an ideal book for those who have found themeselves having to care for someone who has been labelled as "mentally ill"...and being treated with these mind altering drugs. The book is a revelation that these Rx's do indeed prevent symptomatic recovery...ask any patient in a psychiatric ward.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Mary G. Madrigal on August 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
Dr. Grace Jackson has done an excellent job in engaging and capturing the reader's attention beginning with the Prologue and ending with the epilogue... Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent.... as Emeril would say.... BAM!!! Job well done.

The structure of the book is well organized; the headings are clearly defined with supporting data, statistics, and content. The size of font and spacing are excellent ... I appreciate that the paragraphs are not lengthy and made for easy reading.

The book is a worthy reference manual. literally... each line led me to want to read more. more .. faster and faster.. I did not find myself having to ask, what am I reading? What is this author trying to tell me?

Most of chapters are short (7,8,9-are longer chapters), concise, clearly outlined, digestible, revelant, not awkward or overly complicated, and they flow.

Beginning with chapters 4 to 9 Dr. Jackson provides a variety of scientific studies, visual aids, tables, and comparison studies, which substantiate the content of her book.

I appreciate that Dr. Jackson deciphers and explains the comprehensive data for the non-scientific mind in chapters

4 to 9

As a mental health professional, Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent has now equipped me with some vital information to be a more effective clinician.

A hundred thanks you, Dr. Jackson!!!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By worddancer VINE VOICE on February 21, 2011
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I have read several dozen of the (broadly) popular-market books that discuss psychoactive medications and the regulatory policies (and politics) that have got them embedded as the chosen form of treatment for psychiatric illness. (This falls squarely in the middle of my area of academic research.) Several of these books are excellent: Greenberg's and Moncrieff's books stand out, and Whitaker's, Watters' and some of Healy's critiques are also well worth reading. But Jackson's book is in a class by itself. There is a lot of technical medical and pharmacological detail in the book, but it is, in general, well presented and broadly comprehensible even to (attentive) readers who do NOT have specialist medical training. The narrative is also clear and well presented, and the overall argument is cogently framed. It is well worth reading.
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