Retire on Less Than You Think, Revised Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.59
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Retire on Less Than You Think: The New York Times Guide to Planning Your Financial Future Paperback – February 4, 2004


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February 4, 2004
$0.01 $0.01

Special Offers and Product Promotions


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Times Books; 1st edition (February 4, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805073744
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805073744
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,802,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The aging of the baby boomers heralds in its own way a rush to proffer advice and counsel on all topics, from reinventing lives to investing wisely for the short and longer terms. This experienced financial professional jumps at the opportunity of focusing on the latter. By no means a self-acclaimed money wizard, New York Times "Seniority" columnist Brock has, quite literally, learned on the job--and applies his knowledge frankly and pragmatically. What's more, his main message may shock many who have long believed that 70 to 80 percent of final salary is a mandatory number to accumulate for retirement. His recommendation? Based on current and projected savings, it may be just as easy to cut back and simplify lifestyles, whether that means moving to a less expensive area or streamlining postretirement activities or both. Plenty of research and resources support his contention, including Web sites like BestPlaces.net and actual great-to-hear reader stories. There's 81-year-old Elton Pasea of Nederland, Texas, who enjoys his passion of bicycling and an active lifestyle on less than $2,000 a month. Energizing--and extraordinarily enlightening. Barbara Jacobs
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

Fred Brock is a business editor and writes the “Seniority” column for The
New York Times. He has also covered business and finance issues for The Wall Street Journal, the Houston Chronicle, and the Louisville Courier-Journal. He lives in New Jersey.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This is a great beginners book for people looking to begin there plans for retirement.
Steve Burns
I gave the book two stars because there is some useful information here and there, but nothing you could not find in the web in a few minutes.
Amazon Customer
The author advises things like buying a used car and driving it for many years; haven't most people figured this out on their own?
missouri reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

112 of 115 people found the following review helpful By Steven Lee on October 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
The basic premise of the book is that you don't need a retirement nest egg large enough to provide you with 70-80% of your present income to retire comfortably. This is contrary to the common advice found in the marketplace and the author attacks this as hype. I found his commentary insightful and thought provoking as I had bought into the believe that you needed at least 70% of your present income otherwise you would be stuck eating Alpo. I agree with the author's basic point that if you live in an expensive metropolitan area (e.g. Manhattan, Chicago, SF) and are willing to relocate to a less expensive area you can retire comfortably on a modest income. I agree with some commentators' criticism that the author spends time making his own political commentary on Social Security and healthcare, but this does not detract from the rest of the book. I wish the book had gone into more detail on some of the subjects covered, but a reader can continue researching various topics by looking at the websites recommended in the book. Unless you are "set for life," I would recommend that you take a look at this book. After reading it, I am rethinking my retirement plans and am not nearly as nervous of making my retirement work as I was before.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
82 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Joseph S. Maresca HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on January 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
This work focuses your attention on the amount of money needed
during retirement-taking into consideration the
best places to retire and control of unnecessary expenditures.
Bellington, Washington, Iowa City and Sarasota, Florida are
cited as preferred retirement communities. Strategies to retire
slightly later can yield significant benefits in the size of
the monthly income resulting from social security. In some cases,
a delay of even 3-4 years in retirement can result in getting
a 50% increase in the monthly allotment. The author recommends
to simplify life in order to maximize the benefit from your
monthly income. This book is an excellent supplemental reference
for your retirement planning. As such, it is well worth the price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is truly a new perspective than the one you hear from the financial community. Fred Brock debunks the myths that it takes millions of dollars to retire. Every financial website has a calculator to tell you how much you have to save and invest to have millions to retire. This just isn't practical for most people. He shows that if you own a home with a 30-yr. mortgage, by the time you retire it should be paid off. So, there is no longer a mortgage payment which is usually your greatest expense. Also, if you move to a city that is one of the best places to retire (he gives the web address to find these cities), the money you have will go much further while maintaining the same or better standard of living. Also, healthcare is a concern for retirees. He directs you to ehealthinsurance.com to compare rates. I did this and changed my insurance plan and am saving $50/month. This book is an eye-opener for anyone planning to retire but after reading the book you should feel relieved that you can really can retire on less than you think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 43 people found the following review helpful By missouri reader on March 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
There is a little useful information in this book, but the main advice is to sell your home in an area where property values are very high and relocate to a less expensive area. This is repeated throughout the sections of the book. If you already live in one of the less-expensive areas and do not have a large house to sell,this advice is little help to you. The author advises things like buying a used car and driving it for many years; haven't most people figured this out on their own? There is a lot of filler in the form of stories about people who illustrate the author's view, many of whom are "indulging their passion for bicycling" in retirement.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
What a refreshing take on retirement! Instead of retirement plans that make life wonderful for Wall Street brokers and mutual fund companies, Mr. Brock, gasp, has some serious ideas here for potential retirees. He shows how you don't need as much to retire as the fund companies would like you to think you need. And why would they like you to think that? Because they make money off of your investments. This book also puts the so-called Social Security crisis in perspective, showing how there really isn't a crisis at all. The system is rock solid for years to come. (Who would gain from privatizing Social Security? Wall Street.) One of the amazing things about this book, with all these "radical" notions, is that it is written by a columnist for the establishment - The New York Times. Buy this book and learn how to get out of the rat race a little bit earlier.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By James T. Hammond on January 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
Fred Brock's book is essential reading for babyboomers who want to retire early. It challenges conventional thinking about how much money is required for a comfortable retirement. The chapter on coping with health insurance is especially helpful.
Many people fail to anticipate that their living costs are going to shrink as their children become independent, their mortgages are paid off and work related expenses go away. That's the message of the book: That you don't need as much as financial services advisers often suggest you will need.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 49 people found the following review helpful By David Savageau on April 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
This isn't a coherent book for overcoming your fears of retiring without enough money. Its a hasty and crude assemblage of Brock's "Seniority" columns from the New York Times. Indeed, the copyright is in the name of the newspaper instead of the author's.

Look at the book's cover. It pushes the image that we're all timid little sparrows nervously watching eggs in our nests. If I read "nestegg" and "golden years" one more time, I'll need to excuse myself to retch in the hedges.

I believe healthcare is a mess and "private accounts" won't solve Social Security's future troubles. But like other readers, I object to material that supports one side of these issues in a general book on retirement planning.

For all that, the book's premise is absolutely correct: You don't really need 70 to 80 percent of preretirement income investments advisors say you do. Keep looking; there must be a better book than this out there.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0x9f1fad74)