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Retro Food Fiascos: A Collection of Curious Concoctions Hardcover – March, 2004

7 customer reviews

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From the Publisher

* Recipes include Fiesta Peach-Spam Loaf, Hot Turkey Surprise, Tomato Soup Cake, and Lime and Cottage Cheese Loaf. With 125 photos and illustrations of wacky and wonderful foods.

About the Author

KATHY CASEY has been credited with elevating Northwest cuisine to a national level. She and her cuisine have been featured in numerous national publications including Food & Wine and the New York Times as well as on television shows like Good Morning America and CBS This Morning. An accomplished food writer, she authored Pacific Northwest: The Beautiful Cookbook and Dishing with Kathy Casey, among others, and is a Julia Child Cookbook Award nominee. She and her husband, John, are co-owners of Dish D’Lish at Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington.


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Product Details

  • Series: Retro
  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Collectors Press (March 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1888054883
  • ISBN-13: 978-1888054880
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 8.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,725,171 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Kathy Casey is a celebrity chef, mixologist and pioneer in the bar-chef movement.

She played a key role in bringing Northwest cuisine and women chefs to national prominence and, as one of the first female executive chefs in the United States, she was named one of Food & Wine's "hot new American chefs." She has also been touted as being the original Bar Chef and was named one of the top 10 most influential bar people of the past 25 years by Cheers Magazine.

Kathy is the owner of Kathy Casey Food Studios® - Liquid Kitchen®, a global food, beverage, and concept development and innovation agency specializing in all things delicious. Clients such as Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, Ritz Carlton, Mandarin Oriental Hotels, Marriott International, The Cheesecake Factory, California Pizza Kitchen, Applebee's, Sunkist, Alaska Seafood Marketing, Costco, Holland America Line, Unilever, Odyssey Seafood, Darden Restaurant Group, IHOP, TGI Friday's, Landry's, Inc., HMS Host, Monin Gourmet, and Sun Orchard as well as spirit companies such as Bacardi USA, Beam Suntory., Anheuser-Busch, and Moët Hennessy have sought her development skills, advice, and expertise.

Kathy also owns Dish D'Lish® "Food to Go-Go" ® cafes as well as Dish D'Lish branded retail and food-service specialty food products and cocktail mixers.

A savvy spotter of what's hot in the culinary and cocktail scene, Kathy is a frequent TV and radio guest and speaker on trends. She has been featured in numerous national publications, including Esquire, USA Today, Fortune, People Magazine, Cheers, Food Arts, Food & Wine, Gourmet, Time Out, the San Francisco Chronicle, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. She has appeared on such shows as CNN, Good Morning America, Food Network's Unwrapped, the Travel Channel's Cooking Across America, the Larry King Show, Fine Living's Great Cocktails, CBS This Morning and Northern Exposure. You can often catch her on television as a frequent guest chef, mixologist, and entertaining expert. Her cocktail show Kathy Casey's Liquid Kitchen® on Small Screen Network mixes her talent behind the bar and experience as a chef into a creative journey through great drinks inspired by the kitchen. Her radio segment Dishing with Kathy Casey airs weekends on KOMO news radio.

An accomplished writer, she is the author of ten cookbooks, including the James Beard Award-nominated Kathy Casey's Northwest Table and Sips & Apps. Her newest book is D'Lish Deviled Eggs. You can catch her latest Dishing adventures on her blog. Casey also pens the feature column "Shake Swizzle & Stir" for Sip Northwest magazine and "Spiked Cider Cocktails" for CIDERCRAFT magazine as well as blogs for "Ask the Expert Mixologist" for Food Network Canada. She is also a yearly contributor for the Food & Wine Cocktails annual recipe book.

Her blog Dishing with Kathy Casey was included in's Sites We Love. Kathy is an avid social media enthusiast and, when not dreaming up "the next big thing," Kathy can be found foraging for wild mushrooms, shaking up cocktails with ingredients from her urban garden ... or Twitter-ing way too much.

Twitter: @KathyCaseyChef and @LiquidKitchenTV
Facebook: Liquid Kitchen, Drink Nation Experiment
Kathy Casey's Liquid Kitchen Cocktail Show:

For more information, contact Erwin C. Santiago at

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Andrew S. Rogers VINE VOICE on September 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I was prepared not to like this book, because it is very similar in theme, approach, appearance, and even some of the specific recipes featured, to James Lileks' The Gallery of Regrettable Food. Very similar.


Two things set this title apart, however. One is that there is generally less commentary on the recipes here, and I tended to find Lileks' ironic tone a little tiresome when taken in large doses. Here, though, it was much easier to sit down and digest, so to speak, much of this book all at once. A second difference is that author and chef Kathy Casey (go Seattle!) apparently actually gave some of these recipes a try, which I'm not sure, or can't remember whether, Lileks ever did. That bravery on her part gives her commentary a bit more personal insight.

As with Lileks' book, the overwhelming conclusion the reader comes to after flinching his way through these cringe-inducing recipes, is, "How in the world could they eat this stuff?" Also: What was the deal with all the gelatin? I do, however, have to call B.S. (as the saying goes) on a couple of the recipes here. Short of seeing primary documentation, I absolutely refuse to believe that Jellied Moose Nose (p. 67) is a real period recipe [edit: I've since been informed that yes, it is]. And I have my doubts about Gingersnap Tongue (p. 80) and Heart With Apple-Raisin Stuffing (p. 88) too. But apart from them, I mostly marvel at the twisted and/or desperate minds that could come up with things like Veal-Oyster Loaf (p. 70), three words that should NEVER appear in sequence, or the magnificent Crown Roast of Frankfurters (p. 75), which I believe, again, is in Lileks' book too.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Charlene Vickers on August 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I thought Retro Food Fiascos was nothing more than a blatant ripoff of James Lileks's "Gallery of Regrettable Food". The cover art, the typeface, even the design of the book, are very reminiscent of Lileks's oeuvre, and I expected it to be nothing more than a tired retread of the Lileks book with the same dull wit and the same snide, sardonic comments.

I was wrong.

This book is so much better! The comedy of the food itself far surpasses Mr. Lileks's sarcastic comments. What's more, this book includes recipes and even tips on preparing the food. I mean, what do you do with dried beef, canned potatoes, or pressed lamb if by some strange course of events you are presented with such? Retro Food Fiascos has the answer.

As for Jellied Moose Nose: that recipe comes from the very useful and humorous "Northern Cookbook", and has been made a number of times by cooks in northern Canada, although with mixed results. But, God forbid, should you be left with nothing in the kitchen but a moose nose, isn't it useful to know what to do?
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By T. Jackson on June 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
After reading this book I realized that one of my favorite sandwiches is tame by far (peanut butter toast with taco meat and cheese). I'm not brave enough to try some of the recipes but there are a few that I want to give a go.
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By Josie James on September 21, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wow, hard to believe these are actual recipes that people used to actually make and eat. Funny, but yuk!
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