Buy Used
$7.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shelf and edge wear, bumping at corners, dust jacket has been repaired with clear tape. Pages are clean, clear and tight. Cover is shiny and bright.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Return to Midway Hardcover – October 1, 1999


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.19 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic; First Edition edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0792275004
  • ISBN-13: 978-0792275008
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.8 x 11.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #912,245 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

On the morning of June 7, 1942, six months to the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the USS Yorktown "turned over on her port side and sank in about 3,000 fathoms of water with all battle flags flying." Many of her men watched from the decks of the Vireo, the Benham, the Hughes, and the Hammann, weeping as the Old Lady went down. The Battle of Midway was finally over. Though the Yorktown was lost, the battle was won--what John Keegan has called "as great a reversal of strategic fortune as the naval world has ever seen." From that point on, the Japanese remained primarily on the defensive at sea.

On the morning of May 19, 1998, Robert D. Ballard stared into a video monitor hoping for a glimpse of metal on the bottom of the sea. "Thar she blows! Bingo!" After almost three weeks out, painstakingly scanning the ocean floor with high-altitude sonar, and many months of research and planning, Ballard and his crew had spotted the Yorktown some three miles down. The wreck was in remarkably good condition: "It was as if we had stumbled on the ship a few minutes after it made its death plunge."

In Return to Midway, Ballard weaves a compelling narrative, blending the story of the famous battle with his battle to find the sunken ships--the Yorktown and the USS Hammann, as well as four Japanese aircraft carriers. First-hand accounts by the men who were there, including two Japanese and two American servicemen who joined Ballard and his crew for the hunt, as well as paintings and archival photographs, detail the battle in all its horror, while capturing the honor of the men who fought on both sides. Military-history buffs will find this book--the first in decades specifically about the Battle of Midway--especially valuable, though fans of Ballard's work as an oceanographer will be equally captivated. --Sunny Delaney

From Library Journal

Midway--the name evokes images of insurmountable odds and heroic sacrifice on the part of the U.S. Navy in 1942, for it was this battle (and those of the Coral Sea and Guadalcanal) that stemmed the tide of Japanese aggression in the Pacific and began the march to victory that would end in Tokyo harbor in August 1945. In this rich visual and narrative account, Ballard deftly intersperses chapters on the Battle of Midway with a fascinating account of his search for the U.S.S. Yorktown, which was sunk by a Japanese destroyer on June 7, 1942. Period photographs from the battle are combined with those of the Yorktown as she rests today, and paintings by marine artist Ken Marschall add detail to complete the record. The lively narrative is punctuated with two Japanese and two American oral history accounts of the battle. As with his books on the Titanic, the Bismarck, and the ships of Guadalcanal, Ballard has once again produced a visual tour de force that will evoke memories in those remaining veterans of what the late Gordon W. Prange termed the "miracle at Midway" while firing the imaginations of a younger generation. Highly recommended.
-Harold N. Boyer, Springfield Twp. Lib., Aston, PA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

A nice addition to my WW2 collection!
D. Roberts
This book is a very good read and is written exceptionally well.
Iain Williams
I now have a signed copy of this wonderful book.
ford77

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Bernice E. Ward on December 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This was an excellent overview of both the battle and the expedition to find the 5 carriers. Well illustrated. The only thing I would like to have seen more of was the details of the Yorktown wreck. Only a few photos of the wreck are included, although the text mentions that they took hundreds of detailed photos. Get the companion video, too!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book falls into the same grade as Dr. Ballards other excellent books such as on the Titanic and the Bismark.
To most WWII Navy History buffs, the story of Midway is both great and a little over told. The dumb fact is America won the battle because the IJNS Cruiser Tone couldn't launch a recon aircraft. I don't think the American dumb luck factor was stressed enough in the book. However, luck makes a huge amount of difference in war. Right now the CSA would be alive and well had General Robert E. Lee had not made an extra copy of his orders of attack prior to the Battle of Antitiam.
I can't fault the fantastic pictures of the USS Yorktown. The book is worth the price of that alone. Seeing the 1.1 inch machine guns pointing skyward is like seeing a moment frozen in time. There are few things like this in American history.
The cold fact is Midway was THAT important of a battle. Had the three American carriers been sunk then the USA could not have gone on the offensive until 1944 or later.
The stories of veterans of the battle were quite insightful. However, you can't get over this weird feeling that both groups of veterans still really don't like one another over the war. Strange, old hatred dies hard.
I look forward to Dr. Ballard getting funding from Japan to find the Japanise carriers. If the Akagi or any of her sister ships are in this good condition then we could look forward to a small salvage operation being done to raise a small part of the ship in the future.
Now, all readers should know that National Geographic ran a shorter version of this book in just the last year. You can read it for free if you just go to your local library.
This is a great coffee table book and would make a great history present to any Navy buff.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Pardus Amicus on November 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most of Ballard's books are large, well illustrated, and to the point. This one however spends most of the page count on his thoughts about the veterans aboard Ballard's research vessel, the battle itself, and WW2. I wouldn't mind reading about his thoughts in another book as he is usually very insightful but it wasn't what I bought this particular book for.

After Ballard's commentaries and the history sections we see only very little relating to the Yorktown and underwater archeology which is rather disappointing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The above reviews address the factual and textual quality of the book. While these are fine, I wish to draw attention to those who may be hoping for a similar quality of book to Bob Ballard's previous works. Alas, a quick flick through the book reveals a significant lack of photographic and illustrative imagery, certainly bare bones stuff to other excellent works such as Lusitania, Bismarck etc...
What this has to do with National Geographic as publisher I don't know, but I was a little disappointed over all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Iain Williams on January 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is a very good read and is written exceptionally well. The historical information on the Battle of Midway is very easy to read, interesting and thought provocative. The author attempts, and succeeds, to involve the reader in the actual battle by introducing personal accounts from a number of American and Japanese veterans. The images within the book are very impressive and the artwork is very detailed and realistic. The discovery of the Yorktown is written concisely and the technical information is well described, yet not out of the understanding of any educated person. The only down side of the book is the poor renditions of tactical maps and lack of photographs of the actual Yorktown as it is today, despite the author noting that hundreds of images were taken. Well worth the effort to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nagato on February 15, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Bob Ballard again uses his expertise and access to cutting-edge technology to explore an underwater historical treasure. There are few moments in the 20th Century as critical as the Battle of Midway, yet prior to this expedition little or no attention has been paid to the lasting physical artifacts of that battle scattered on the sea floor. As always seems to be the case with Ballard's expeditions, the only regret is that he was not able to search the area longer and find more of the carriers ... but hopefully there's another expedition in the works!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey T. Munson on March 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In June, 1942, the Japanese and American navies clashed near a small island in the central Pacific; Midway. This battle turned out to be the turning point of the war for both sides. For the Americans, they finally managed to stop the Japanese advance, while the Japanese suffered a crushing defeat and were put on the defensive, never to regain the offensive again. One of the ships sunk in this momentous battle was the American aircraft carrier Yorktown. This ship, the "fighting lady" as she was known to her crew, became the objective of undersea explorer Robert Ballard.
Ballard, who discovered the Titanic, Bismarck, and the lost fleet of Guadalcanal, journeyed to Midway to locate the sunken Yorktown. What he managed to find was a ship in almost pristine condition. The excellent photographs and drawings of the Yorktown contained in the book bring her back to life. Resting in several thousand feet of water, the Yorktown looks in remarkably good condition. The torpedo holes on her side are visible, but the flight deck and island are in very good condition. Also included in the expedition were several Japanese survivors of the battle. Ballard had hoped to locate the four Japanese carriers sunk during the battle, but he unfortunately could not locate them.
The book also describes in great detail the battle itself, and there are many actual photos from the battle contained in the book as well. I have the video of the expedition entitled The Battle For Midway, and this book makes a fine companion to the video. I highly recommend both the video and the book. They do an excellent job describing one of the most important battles of the 20th century as well as bringing a "fighting lady" back to life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews