Reunion Tour

September 25, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:17
30
2
3:08
30
3
2:37
30
4
3:34
30
5
4:08
30
6
2:43
30
7
4:00
30
8
4:35
30
9
2:23
30
10
2:07
30
11
4:34
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 25, 2007
  • Release Date: September 25, 2007
  • Label: Epitaph
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 37:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000X6X9K4
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,538 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Bonsai Hero on October 15, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Canadian indie outfit The Weakerthans has released just four albums in the 10 years of their existence, which has been just enough to barely keep their heads above the waters of obscurity. Nevertheless, the songwriting prowess of frontman John K Samson is such that the band maintains a modestly healthy fanbase; the two shows I've attended have been tiny venues (200-300 seaters), but both have sold out. The Weakerthans even surface occasionally in the pop mainstream (their song "Aside" was the end-credits track in the 2005 comedy "The Wedding Crashers"). All of the band's members have various arts-related day jobs, and this down-to-earth aesthetic is embodied in their music.

The best and the worst thing about "Reunion Tour", which was 4 years in the making, is that it has an insurmountable air of familiarity. As a fan with only marginal interest in The Weakerthans, I found myself confusing the new songs for the old songs at a recent show. Samson is a singularly impressive songwriter, and his command of language in particular makes some of his indie peers look like simpletons. The opening track, "Civil Twilight", is an eloquent fiction narrated by an imaginary, lovelorn bus driver, and the manner in which Samson tosses off the song's first lines is nothing short of masterful: "My confusion-cornered commuters are cursing the cold away / As December tries to dissemble the length of their working day / And they bite their mitts off to show me transfers, deposit change / And I can't stop finding your face in their faces, all rearranged." But Samson seems to be stuck in a melodic rut, repeating many of the same musical patterns over and over again, both here and on previous albums.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. FINK on November 11, 2007
Format: MP3 Music
At best, I might be described as a casual fan of the Weakerthans. Usually I need my music to have some more punch to it, but when I am feeling introspective or low, this is the soundtrack to my mood. So, when I saw a new album had come out, I was not sure if I wanted to fork up the money for something that was so melancholy. Luckily, I did.

The first track starts off with a bit of energy, but it ultimately is not as satisfying as some of the other songs on the album. The Weakerthans shine not when they are full of vigor, but when they are brooding over loss. There are three songs on this album that have just stuck into my mental tape recorder and continue to replay over and over: Virtute the Cat, Sun in an Empty Room, and Night Windows.

On all three of these songs, the Weakerthans show amazing song writing abilities. On Virtute the Cat, the song breaks into what feels like it is going to be a heart breaking chorus and half finishes on the third line making it imperative to listen to it again to satisfy the music itch. Sun in an Empty Room, the number one song for me on the album, defies normal song structure with the reoccurring title phrase bleeding from the verse, to the chorus, and ultimately into the extremely sad conclusion in the bridge. Night Windows has an excellent round of stack vocals, each filled with emotional sincerity.

The Elegy of Gump Worsley is an instant skip whenever I come to it. Some of the other songs are brooding, but they feel more throwaway without a hook to ground them. The lyrics throughout the album, though, are some of the best ever put to music.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alex on November 4, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Weakerthans are putting out music at a consistent musical quality with ever increasing songwriting strength. "Virtute the Cat..." has the be the saddest song written by a human being. The only new album I've heard this year that is firmly in the "great" category.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John M. Callaway on December 24, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Smitsom means "infectious" or "catching" in the danish laguage and that's how I feel about this album. I rated it so hghly because the more I play it, the more I play it. There are two forces at war on this album: the ineloquently nasal indie style whining voice of the lead singer (is it John Samson?) and his lyrical use of the english language (I am just assuming he writes the songs). Alas, the sum of the two is far greater than the addition of the parts and for this reason I have become infected, destined to play it over and over again until the tray on my 10-year old Marantz CD player finally falls off.

Were you a Rangers fan? Did you follow "the Gumper"? Do you remember him endlessly sliding back and forth in front of the cage when the play was at the other end of the rink cleaning the crease as he relentlessly if not pathologically tried to tuck his jersey into his pants?

You do?

Then listen to this album. It doesn't hurt if you grew up in Flin Flon!
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