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Rev Import


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Audio CD, Import, February 20, 2007
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 20, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: 4ad
  • ASIN: B0000251KV
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #789,555 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Candida
2. Cut-Throat
3. Mirror To Mirror
4. Thr Portion Of Delight
5. Thief's Love Song
6. How Sweet
7. Medicating Angels
8. Blood And Thunder
9. This Is The Way

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
Every time I listened to the song, it gave me a different feeling.
MaddKhameleon
Suffice it to say that Ralske and company have here generated a masterpiece of 90s rock, albeit an obscure one.
Ludwig J. Pluralist
It's the most varied in mood and pace, and has a wider range of mood and tempo.
mike jones

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By MaddKhameleon on October 1, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Who is Ultra Vivid Scene? Nobody cares and nobody knows. I know everyone is going to disagree but Kurt Ralske is more of a genius than Kurt Cobain. He is simply the better Kurt, the most important Kurt in the 90s. Both 'Nevermind' and 'Rev' were released in 1991, the former became the touchstone of all 90s' rock albums, well, it is good, but in no way greater than any of the UVS album. While the latter is a classic that is simply unheard of, even to those 4AD fanatics, the UVS sound faded away after 'Rev' was released. For a long 9 years, nothing from UVS has been released. I guess even the decaying 4AD label is not interested in releasing anything by UVS. Kurt's one-man show is uncategorizale, the music just cannot sell, they are not as melancholic as Radiohead and Red House Painter, not as angry as every punk band, not as cutting-edge as MBV, not as etheral as Cocteau Twins, not as pop as most pop bands. An outcast in the music industry. Nobody cares. Everyone keeps on dismissing the band because no major media have covered them. I really feel sorry for Kurt, but I am even more regretful for the general public, for not having a chance to be exposed to this. Just listen to the album: The first track sounds quite accessible actually, Kurt seems to be quite cheerful, he doesn't seem to have the angst that possessed the other Kurt. These are just superficies. Take note of the lyrics: It talks about blood, talks about suicide, talks about 'She comes, she comes...'. Get the idea? No? OK, just move on to the second track 'Cut-Throat', from the title of the track, it isn't hard to tell that this track, again talks about suicide. The guy talks about suicide as a joy, as if he is he enjoys it. He may, who knows?Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By mike jones on February 27, 2003
Format: Audio CD
UVS's albums have sent shivers down my spine for the last twelve years. Of all of them, Rev seems to best stand the test of time. (Don't get me wrong, the others are fantastic too, but are perhaps more of their period). It's the most varied in mood and pace, and has a wider range of mood and tempo. Decadent, dispassionate - yet intense - vocals; soaring, sliding guitars; tension meticulously built up and relieved. A criminally under-rated artist. Kurt, there's an 80's/90,s revival. Do us all a favour and get down to that recording studio.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Hartley on July 5, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Virtual one-man band Kurt Ralske (aka "Ultra Vivid Scene") has definitely worn out his early Pink Floyd albums. This album of textured dream-pop (with a rough edge tossed in here and there) should please you if you enjoy a little psychedelia mixed in with your alternative. Standout track: "Mirror To Mirror",an atomospheric and insidiously hypnotic number. This is definitely one for the headphones!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John L Murphy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 4, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Excellent 1991 album, deserving of top rank for the 90's. I suppose grunge wiped this comparatively sophisticated album off the charts into oblivion, but, like Roxy Music's "Avalon" of nearly a decade earlier, it endures as a crooner's meditation and confrontation with evocative but evanescent beauty. Sexual obsession permeates many of the tracks, which have overlays ranging from the Velvets, The Who, Led Zep, and classic rock from the early 70s. This may seem surprising to those who had heard his one-man UVS (too tinny sounding, but not bad) and "Joy" efforts, but this surpasses even "Joy," which holds up well as a catchy, solid DIY album. It's a pity that Kurt Ralske, who seems to have moved into production (Lotion, Lilys) later in the decade, no longer issues his own promising music.

"Rev" takes the sheen of its predecessor and dips it into a darker, bloodier taint. The lyrical fascination with seduction, secretion, and submission makes this a modern take on Severin or even a younger John Cale. Kurt Ralske, working with other musicians here to round out a luxuriantly cushioned bed of sound, thickens his previous songcraft by stirring in more menace. His crooning style does lack necessary range, and makes the tracks more samey than they are musically, yet this consistency does weave its power well.

The Middle Eastern influences merged with a Keith Moon-type drum assault, for instance, make marvelously hypnotic soundtracks for erotic reverie, headphone introspection, and/or late-night accompaniment. The addition of other musicians here warms up what had been a rather too-clinical detachment on the first two UVS albums. Ralske's choice here is the right one. This album cradles you and pushes you away, and it contains a magnetic personality within that few records create, sustain, and beckon again a listener to return to when its mood invites.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By southpaw68 VINE VOICE on September 13, 2001
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I remember listening to Blood and Thunder once on the radio and getting the name of the band. I really thought it was a great song with it's droning sounds and great drums and it stayed in my memory for a long time. I suppose the song is religious in a strange sort of way. Is it a psychotic hymn to Jesus and communion? One can only speculate. I was pretty poor at the time though and I didn't want to pay the price for the album. Years later, I finally picked it up dirt cheap. Fortunately, I found the other songs equal to or about as good as Blood and Thunder. Portion of Delight seems to about making love to a virgin and Thief's Love Song uses high-pitched female vocals; these songs border on the erotic without being obvious. How Sweet has a nice slinky feel with its growling rhythm guitar chords. Mirror to Mirror is haunting. The CD sustains its dreamy floating feel throughout. The singer has a low-key, nasal, almost whispery voice. He's not very emotional and his lyrics are vague, but it's mainly the music that's the star here with its great guitar and drum work. Another guitar fanatic, Matthew Sweet, plays bass on some tracks. I like him too. UVS is not as sentimental or emotional as Sweet is with his down-to-earth lyrics though. They both have mild-mannered vocal styles, but UVS does not use a whole lot of background vocals or vocals that emphasize melody as much. I would give it five stars but I can't relate to the opaque lyrics much emotionally, although I can't say they're annoying. They sort of float over your head like that ghost. I thought this CD was better than similar CDs, like Urban Hymns or OK Computer--by a long shot.
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