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The Book of Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary) Hardcover – October, 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1309 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; First Edition edition (October 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080282174X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802821744
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.3 x 2.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #971,769 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

America
“Beale . . . is a master not only of the biblical text but also of the secondary literature. His work will serve primarily as a reference commentary to be consulted when the reader wants a comprehensive and fair presentation of the evidence regarding a disputed point coupled with a clear line of argumentation and the author’s own conclusion. . . . A reliable guide to the many literary, historical, and theological problems encountered in reading Revelation.”

Interpretation
“A strong contribution to scholarship and a valuable resource for a more general audience. . . . Beale has performed a distinctive service. His bold positions are thoroughly argued. His erudition and depth of research are admirable. And he displays strong skills in historical reconstruction and exegesis. His treatment of John’s work with the Hebrew scriptures alone make his commentary worth consulting.”

Journal of Biblical Literature
“A significant contribution to our understanding of Revelation. . . . This commentary will certainly provide considerable insight into John’s often perplexing vision. In particular, Beale’s grasp of the Greek grammar of Revelation is outstanding. Too few scholars today have the linguistic expertise to furnish the reader with such extensive and thoughtful notes. . . . A truly important work that should be consulted as a reference by serious scholars of the Apocalypse.”

The Bible Today
“A massive and thorough commentary on Revelation. . . . Takes its place as one of several important resources for interpreting this fascinating New Testament book.”

Grant Osborne
-- Trinity Evangelical Divinity Schools
“This is an incredibly learned study, a magisterial commentary on one of the most difficult books in the Bible. There has never been a deeper probing of the Old Testament allusions in the Apocalypse, nor a better presentation of the idealist interpretation. This work will be essential for all scholars and students of the book of Revelation for years to come.”

M. Eugene Boring
-- Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University“Beale has provided the academic community with an excellent contribution to the expanding library of reference works for interpreting the Apocalypse. . . . This volume will undoubtedly take its place as a standard work to be considered in responsible study of Revelation.”

Richard Bauckham
-- University of St. Andrews
“This long-awaited commentary is a magnificent achievement and will be an invaluable guide and resource for all future study of Revelation. Beale’s particular emphasis on interpreting the text by reference to the Old Testament Scriptures and Jewish exegetical traditions is one that the text itself invites, while the orientation to theological reflection is also very welcome in a commentary on this profoundly theological text.”

J. P. M. Sweet
-- Cambridge University
“Beale has an unrivaled knowledge of Revelation and its Jewish background. His work will be invaluable both to scholars and students who want a thorough treatment of the textual and critical problems and to pastors and laypeople who want to know what Revelation meant -- and means -- in its own terms.” --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Dr. Gregory K. Beale is Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia.

Customer Reviews

It is one of the finest commentaries I have ever read and I believe I am able to begin to grasp this difficult book for the first time.
M. Galishoff
The reader will come away with an appreciation of the major interpretive views of Reveltion as well as an excellently argued defense of Beale's idealist viewpoint.
Todd Grotenhuis
It seems to help the students catch the flow of the text and to connect ideas in a more complex and systematic way than a regular flow analysis.
David A. Bielby

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

157 of 162 people found the following review helpful By Chris Lee on December 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Bill Mounce (son of Dr. Robert Mounce, who wrote another Revelation commentary, also colleague of Dr. Beale at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary) once joked and said that "you know it's good when it's so thick."
I took a New Testament Interpretation class with Dr. Beale, and also have his Revelation class notes.
Indeed, this is a brilliantly written book, which is well-written and thoroughly done from an amillennial perspective. Although this camp is not particularly big within evangelicalism (the predominant view being premillennialism), this particular camp has some advantages of being supported by strong scholarship. Beale's book is one of the best in terms of applying interpretational methods.
Beale starts off with about 69 pages of background on symbolism of numbers and the symbolic nature of Revelation. His main premise is that the beginning of the book of Revelation (Rev. 1:1) begins with "he revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants what must soon take place; and he made it known by sending his angel to his servant John..." The word "made it known" (RSV) in greek is esemanen (aorist active indicative, 3rd singular for semaino ... which should be rendered "to be communicated in symbols"). Thus, Beale takes the view that the book of Revelation should be read primarily symbolically unless there is ample evidence that it should not be rendered symbolically. He would note some of those symbols include numbers, lampstands, sword, etc. Thus, because of the symbolic nature of the book, the "1000 years" of Rev. 20:4-6 is to be understood symbolically rather than a literal 1000 years, rendering his view as "amillennial".
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60 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Todd Grotenhuis on June 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is a scholar's dream on Revelation. Beale is to be commended for offering both the current scholarly range of interpretation on Revelation and for lucidly giving his own point of view -- many commentaries today only offer one or the other. The reader will come away with an appreciation of the major interpretive views of Reveltion as well as an excellently argued defense of Beale's idealist viewpoint. Those who do not share the Idealist bias should still be able to benefit from the wide range of differing viewpoints that Beale mentions, although any serious study of Revelation in the future will have to account for Beale's scholarship. Beale uses the Old Testament as his primary (although not only) key for interpreting the myriad puzzling passages in Revelation, and what results is a convincing analysis of a very confusing book. The only problem I could find with this commentary was its length: it is so exhaustive that its length is somewhat prohibitive against frequent usage (researching any passage is a major undertaking). However, this is a small criticism, as a shorter treatment of the subject matter would have prevented Beale from analyzing the text with such impressive depth. If you can afford the expensive cover price you will get all of your money's worth, and more, with this brilliant work.
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48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By David A. Bielby VINE VOICE on September 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I pastor a church (10+ yrs now) about 2 hours from Wheaton College where Beale currently teaches. I audited his Spring 2006 course on Revelation in Greek. I have to say that the man is on fire for God's word. He's got a contagious zeal for the book of Revelation. We had a Greek student (from Greece) in class and visitors from Greece. Apparently they like him a lot.

His exegetical method weighs heavily on a unique approach that includes a relatively rare Discourse Analysis process that Wheaton and about 6 other schools now teach in their Biblical Interpretations Courses. I think someone at Fuller developed it. The Discourse Analysis process is a nice addition to the regular NT Exegesis that Gordon Fee has outlined for everyone in "NT Exegesis". It seems to help the students catch the flow of the text and to connect ideas in a more complex and systematic way than a regular flow analysis.

The linkages to the OT Prophetic books are overwhelming. Beale literally drips with quotations...his live course is about the same as the book. Just compare the quotes on one of his pages to any other commentary and you get way more for your money with Beale.

If you are preaching through Revelation, get Beale and Poythress (The Returning King). I recommend Poythress' outline for a sermon series...and Beale for more exegetical tips and references than you could possibly study for a typical sermon in a week. If you don't know Greek, then Poythress will really help you. His outlines preach well. My main criticism of Beale's work is that his Exegetical Summaries for each section sound very much like a summary that a scholar who does not have to speak to regular folks very often would give. It's not preachable...
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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marc Axelrod VINE VOICE on January 31, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There are a lot of great things to say about this commentary. First of all, from reading it, it is easy to see that there are few things to do with the book of Revelation that Beale has not thought long and hard about. He is especially helpful at elucidating how much John utilizes Old Testament imagery in describing his revelatory visions. The commentary's introduction is 180 pages long and deals with the symbolism in the book of Revelation as well as the grammar and the theology and the political and cultural life setting.
But there are a number of points where the reader will definitely want to question some of Beale's conclusions. Not everyone will follow him in his interpretation of the word 'show' in Rev 1:1, or follow him in his idealistic amillennial understanding of Revelation. The reader may question Beale's reluctance to interpret literally at certain points in the commentary as well. But you can't possibly come away from a careful reading of this volume without learning something. For the educated clergyman, this is a great commentary to get, alongside the more accessible volumes of Craig Koester and Robert Mounce.
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More About the Author

G. K. Beale is professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. In recent years he has served as President and as a member of the executive committee of the Evangelical Theological Society. He has written several books and articles on biblical studies and was the editor of Right Doctrine from Wrong Texts?

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