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Revenge of the Latchkey Kids: An Illustrated Guide to Surviving the 90's and Beyond Paperback – January 3, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company (January 3, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761107452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761107453
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,132,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Ted Rall is pissed off. He has issues. He will never succeed with such a bad attitude--or maybe he already has. Revenge of the Latchkey Kids distills Rall's vast torrent of negative emotions into a passionate litany of what's screwed up in America today. If you're a Gen-Xer who suffered through the parental experiments of the 1970s, or ever slaved for meager pay and no benefits as a temp, or wondered when you'd ever pay off your student loans, Rall will hit a nerve. And then hit it again. And keep hitting it.

It would be simple to dismiss Rall as a whiner if he weren't so right all the time. Furthermore, at the risk of sounding like one of his cartoons, Rall performs a vital social function: he presents a point of view other than that of the demographic 800-pound gorilla, the baby boomer. Rall has no pity for that generation, which he sees as self-indulgent, hypocritical, and well, evil. But the cartoonist is an evenhanded demonizer: Gen-X fares little better; it's clear Rall has no illusions as to what nightmares would ensue if he and his compatriots ran things.

Revenge of the Latchkey Kids is a howl of anger--in perfect pitch. Ted Rall serves up an opinion you won't get anywhere else. Get some before he gives up.

Review

"(Revenge) plants well-aimed kicks on deserving corporate and baby-boomer behinds." (Entertainment Weekly)

"REVENGE features Rall's withering prose and angry, angular cartoons. He's funny. He's honest. He's onto something." (Arthur Salm, San Diego Tribune)

"Clever, biting, and all too true." (Elaine Beebe, The Salem Register Guard)

"More than an essayist and cartoonist, Rall is anthropologist, psychologist, and perhaps revolutionary." (Chris Davis, The Memphis Flyer)

"Rall is one of the fiercest, most unusual satirists producing cartoons for American newspapers today." -- Reviews

The sporadically funny result plants well-aimed kicks on deserving corporate and baby-boomer behinds. But in the end, his seething social observations resolve themselves into a one-note whine. -- Entertainment Weekly, L.S. Klepp


More About the Author

Ted Rall is a nationally syndicated political cartoonist, columnist, graphic novelist, editor, author and occasional war correspondent.

Twice the winner of the RFK Journalism Award and a Pulitzer Prize finalist, Rall's important books include "Revenge of the Latchkey Kids," about the travails of Generation X, and "Silk Road to Ruin," a survey of ex-Soviet Central Asia. He traveled to Afghanistan during the fall 2001 U.S. invasion, where he drew and wrote "To Afghanistan and Back," the first book of any kind about the war. He was also one of the first journalists to declare the war effort doomed, writing in The Village Voice in December 2001 that the occupation had already been lost.

Rall's latest book is "The Book of Obama: How We Went From Hope and Change to the Age of Revolt." His next book, "After We Kill You, We Will Welcome You Back As Honored Guests: Unembedded in Afghanistan," comes out in November 2013.

Inspired after meeting pop artist Keith Haring in a Manhattan subway station in 1986, Rall began posting his cartoons on New York City streets. He eventually picked up 12 small clients, including NY Weekly and a poetry review in Halifax, Nova Scotia, through self-syndication. In 1990, he returned to Columbia University to resume his studies, from which he graduated with a bachelor of arts with honors in history in 1991. (His honors thesis was about American plans to occupy France as an enemy power at the end of World War II.) Later that year, Rall's cartoons were signed for national syndication by San Francisco Chronicle Features, which is no longer in business. He moved to Universal Press Syndicate in 1996.

His cartoons now appear in more than 100 publications around the United States, including the Los Angeles Times, Tucson Weekly, the Harrisburg Patriot-News, Pasadena Weekly and MAD Magazine.

Rall considers himself a neo-traditionalist who uses a unique drawing style to revive the aggressive approach of Thomas Nast, who viewed editorial cartoons as a vehicle for change. His focus is on issues important to ordinary working people--he keeps a sign asking "What do actual people care about?" above his drafting table--such as un- and underemployment, the environment and popular culture, but also comments on political and social trends.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christian on May 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Ted Rall is a great guy who just happens to be a little angry. Fortunately he's learned to funnel this into a fantastic book which I highly recommend. If you've ever in any way found yourself disgruntled with a terrible workplace or happen to be a latch key kid yourself, this book will speak a lot of truth to you. It's clever and funny and I can't wait for Ted Rall's next tome.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Although there were some items of amusement, for the most part, this book is rather cliche and the artwork lacks clarity. As a relative newcomer to the scene, however, this young man (I assume he is in his 20s) may have a bright future in the world of satire once he develops a unique outlook of his own and a bit more life experience from which to "draw" on.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alan Char on March 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Ted Rall succeeds where Scott Adams fails. These cartoons are the biting real-life social commentary that Dilbert likes to think it is. Burn those Dilbert books and buy more Ted Rall.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
I must admit, I can relate to a lot of what Rall has seen and has to say, so naturally I'd end up reading this book. "Kids" is a deeply analytical book compared to some of the drivel I've had to read by "experts" before, and it's eerily correct in most cases. An article in July's "George" about pro wrestling being a populist assault on America immediately reminded me of the section on talk shows in this book. By God, people are going to be heard one way or another; be it Montel Williams or "Raw". I love this book, and I wish I could read it again if it weren't packed away in some box. As for Littleton, if people actually listened to him and others like him in the first place (especially those involved on both sides) it would have at least been less of a surprise. Hell, I anticipated something like that at my or another local high school until the day I graduated because things don't seem to have changed since he was in high school except that they have provoked even worse results- something that was to be expected if no one cared until it was too late.
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