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Revenge of the Lawn: Stories 1962-1970 Paperback – September 1, 1972


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 173 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket; 173 edition (September 1, 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671782096
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671782092
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

* Charming ... the stories have memorable or beautifully handled moments of observation London Review of Books * His writing manages to conjure up a feeling of relaxation and well-being, somehow existing in our reality without being touched by it - easy to fall into and over far too soon. After reading this you'll feel like you've been on holiday with a friend. Time Out * The verbal humour and zany charm of the book remain quite irresistible. Daily Telegraph * He was an absolute original who found cause for celebration in the most unlikely places. Guardian --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Richard Brautigan was born in Tacoma, Washington where he spent much of his youth, before moving to San Francisco where he became involved with other writers in the Beat Movement. During the Sixties he became one of the most prolific and prominent members of the conter-cultural movement, and wrote some of his most famous novels including Trout Fishing in America, Sombrero Fallout and A Confederate General from Big Sur. He was found dead in 1984, aged 49, beside a bottle of alcohol and a .44 calibre gun. His daughter, Ianthe Brautigan, has written a biography of her father, You Can't Catch Death . --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lee Armstrong HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
Richard Brautigan is one of the most original voices in American fiction that we have had. Easily dismissed as lightweight by those who think tediously long sentences betoken great intellectual acumen, he is the antidote to Hemingway. In fact, one story is titled "Ernest Hemingway's Typist." Often whimsical, his wry wit cuts sharply. His images are intensely original & creative as demonstrated by this brief quote from "A Short History of Religion in California," "...so I hugged my arms around a tree and my cheek sailed to the sweet bark & floated there for a few gentle moments in the calm." This collection of short stories from 1962-1970 is a mix of the unusual, the humorous, the profound & the nutty. One of my favorites is what must be the shortest short story I've ever read, "The Scarlatti Tilt." Like a prose poem, in two quick sentences he paints an entire relationship. "The Betrayed Kingdom" is another jewel about a woman who invites guys home & then makes them sleep on the floor. The story has great momentum until Brautigan gets serious in the last paragraph and pulls the plug. "Halloween In Denver" is another hilarious nugget about a couple who prepares for trick-or-treaters and waits all night for some to show up; then as soon as they go to bed comes the knock at the door. I'm not sure what the point of "A Short Story About Contemporary Life In California" is, but it builds to a tremendous climax and is a great demonstration of control of rhythm. The title story about the still & the ducks had me in stitches.

(Reviewer's note: I was reading this book last week when my father passed away. I wondered if I'd remember that this was the book that I was reading when Dad took leave of this world.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Werner on February 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
Even though it's important to revise work and emphasize the "craft" part of narrative craft, there's something to be said of first drafts. I guess I could say "raw" or "perfectly flawed" or something like that, but that doesn't really do the stories here justice. Most of these pieces are bizarre, weird tales that twist within themselves and then back out--like literary dreams and money working dirty-handedly together in "1/3, 1/3, 1/3" or the light-humor of "Ernest Hemingway's Typist"--as the form seems to follow no rules at one point of another.

The same could be said for the rest of the collection, as nearly half of it is either boring ("The Post Offices of Eastern Oregon") or too cryptic ("A Need For Gardens") or both ("1692 Cotton Mather Newsreel"). Half of it isn't, though, and there's a sweet sweet poetry to short pieces like "An Unlimited Supply of 35 Millimetre Film" and "Coffee."

I don't suspect that anyone goes back and revises his or her journal or anything like that, and I don't expect it from a collection such as this, either. The stories have a sort of tossed-off quality to them. It's the same sort of feeling I get from the Melvins, in that they work very hard at sounding like they don't work hard at all. It's called genius, I think. Brautigan is no different, as these sixty-two stories don't necessarily come off like crafted masterworks as much as a series of fictional journal entries.

I've been simultaneously reading Bukowski's collected letter from 1965-1970, and it's interesting how similar the two are as far as working around refinement. Buk tended to get drunk(er) throughout the course of his letters, loosening up to the point of letting everything flow from himself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sherry miles on June 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of my all-time favorite books, I occasionally order copies as gifts. This one arrived in fine shape and its recipient is happy with it.
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Format: Paperback
I considered myself a fan of Brautigan before I stumbled across a copy of _Lawn_ in a bookshop. Now, it's spoiled me so terribly that I feel his poetry has faded by comparison.

I won't tell you that all the tales in this collection are winners. However, I'm certain that (like me) you'll find that two or three leap out & capture your imagination & you find yourself reading them aloud to others. The title story will have you laughing until you cry -- as, probably, will "The Scarlatti Tilt." "Complicated Banking Transactions" is one of the best tales Brautigan ever put on paper.

Most of this book is fiction as only a master poet could possibly write. The prose is downright musical, & deserves live performance.
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Format: Paperback
brilliant short stories. most of which are a page long. every word picked up and assorted together in a beautiful bouquet. a revolutionary with writing. lets all stand applause.
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