Qty:1
  • List Price: $33.00
  • Save: $1.65 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. Otherwise item is in good condition. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Some markings on pages -
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Revolution in Poetic Language (European Perspectives Series) Paperback – April 15, 1984

ISBN-13: 978-0231056434 ISBN-10: 0231056435 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $31.35
24 New from $27.46 33 Used from $6.88
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$31.35
$27.46 $6.88

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Revolution in Poetic Language (European Perspectives Series) + Desire in Language: A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art + Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (European Perspectives Series)
Price for all three: $92.15

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: European Perspectives Series
  • Paperback: 271 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press; 1st edition (April 15, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231056435
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231056434
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #217,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A lucid and creative consideration of the status and stakes of contemporary cultural criticism, it is essential reading for students of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries--and a monumental challenge to all of us. -- Alice Jardine Harvard University

Review

Students and scholars of psychoanalysis, semiotics, linguistics, and feminist theory alike will rejoice to see Julia Kristeva's "La Revolution du langue poetique" now finally appearing in English... A crucially important book.

(Toril Moi French Studies)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
The previous reviewer clearly did not understand this intricate and admittedly difficult work in the least - it is certainly NOT an example of the "emperor has no clothes" syndrome. It is, however, a challenging and complicated work that presumes a good deal of exposure to continental philosophy (especially the phenomonologies of Hegel, Husserl, and Heidegger) and Freudian/Lacanian psychoanalysis. Kristeva does an impresive and convincing - as well as constructive - job of tying together these overlapping philosophical/ideolgical traditions and ties them into notions of how a subject comes to exist as such in and through a world of language... Going behind the mis-en-abime of Lacan and beyond the linguistic monism of postsrtucturalism, Kristeva gives a living, breathing account of these different themes (of which the previous reviewer seem utterly unaware - but then again, philosophy can be hard)....more later...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Zachary A. Hanson on August 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
I stumbled across the three-star average for this and was appalled. Of course, it is based on one person giving a poor toss-off review and another person giving a positive review, still a toss-off. I identify with what the latter reviewer is doing here. Amazon reviews cannot do this work justice. You have to go soak this in for yourself. All I can say is that it is as life-changing as theory gets. All the rest of us can dream of being so revolutionary and lucid as Kristeva here. That is the use of this book in this era. An important use at that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sergio Natuche on February 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
In this great book, you will find a whirled stairway to the very innards of that stirring and shaking inquiry called theory. From Saussure to Husserl, from Plato to Freud, and taking on Chomsky, Frege, Hjelmslev and las but not least, Lacan, Kristeva undertakes a criticism which is that of the two most troubling concepts in the western thought: the subject and the sign.

In order to a new and, more and foremost, springing overture to come about, this French psychoanalyst and critic penetrates in the very core of the more intricated authors who built his theories within the sing and the subject; a sign and a subject Kristeva tears apart from the confortable room that eiher in structuralism (with Saussure and Hjelmslev, but also with Noam Chomsky) as in fenomenology (with Husserl)they reside, and finds out the semiotic, this motilities drives whiches allow a freer subject to show up in the very symbolism of language and, even with no destroy it, disrupt it from within, taking over the symbolic whereby all the socials constraints burst into the individual.

Thus, we have in this Etrangere (as Barthes named her) one of the most creative and, hence, one of the most revolutionaries thought the twentieth century give us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?